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THE MADSEN 



THE MA] 



PROPERTY OF: 
DAVID 0. McKAY LIBRARY 

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DAVID O. MCKAY LIBRARY 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 
Brigham Young University- Idaho 



http://www.archive.org/details/ourhermadfam02shaw 



OUR HERITAGE 

THE MADSEN 

FAMILY 



Volume II 



Merry Foster Shaw 



Copyright 2005 

Merry Foster Shaw 

Author/Editor 

Foster Family Organization 



No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form 
without written permission of the author/editor. 

Printed in the United States of America 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



VOLUME II 

TABLE OF CONTENTS iii 

AUTHOR/EDITOR vii 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS i x 

DEDICATION xi 

TERMS AND PHRASES xiii 

INTRODUCTION xvii 

1. STELLA MAXINE DOUGLASS 1 

LEWIS L. TROUT 

2. ORRIN VERNICE DOUGLASS 17 

DOROTHY WILSON CHOULES 

3. LENA ILENE DOUGLASS 41 

MONTROSE PIQUET 

4. ERMA GENEAL DOUGLASS 67 

LARRY RAY FULLMER 

5. JOHNNIE WILLIAM MADSEN 77 

BESSIE CHASE CAMPBELL 
MARY REYNOLDS 

6. LUELLA VIOLA MADSEN 113 

ROBERT WESLEY TROUT 

7. AMY PEARL MADSEN 135 

WESLEY JOHN GOODSON 
EMMETT HUBBARD 
HAROLD THOMAS CHILD 

8. ELVIN WESLEY GOODSON 179 

BETTY JUNE WALKER 

9. AMY JEANICE GOODSON 193 

BARBER DEWANE DYE, JR. 



in 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



VOLUME II 

(Continued) 

10. SHIRLEY JEAN HUBBARD 207 

WESLEY DELOY BURRIS 

11. BONNIE RAE HUBBARD 221 

GARY DAVID HANSEN 

12. CONNIE LARAINE HUBBARD 241 

RICHARD BRUCE MARTIN 

13. HAROLD TERRY CHILD 263 

JENNIFER SETHMANN 

14. RUBY NADA MADSEN 277 

HOWARD LESLIE SORTOR 

15. HOWARD DELMER SORTOR 309 

ELLA BURWELL 
NADINE BROWER 

16. LAVERL DEAN SORTOR 319 

JOANN E. MARSHALL 

17. DALE GEORGE SORTOR 329 

JEAN SANDERS DIVESTI 

18. ERMA MARLENE SORTOR 341 

LAMONT C. ANDERSON 

19. WANDA LOU SORTOR 361 

ORVILLE RAYMOND BOCK 

20 BEVERLY JOYCE SORTOR 385 

AUSTIN RAYGENE HENSON 

21 . JUDY JEAN SORTOR 395 

DAN CRAIG GILLIES 

22. SANDRA LEE SORTOR 405 

DAVID TARBET 



IV 



Table of Contents 



VOLUME II 

(Concluded) 

23. LUELLA COLLEEN SORTOR 415 

MICHAEL VANLEUVAN 

24. RICKY LESLIE SORTOR 423 

PAMELA KAY DEEGS 
TIARE MAHER FERGUSON 

25. VELNA SYBLE MADSEN 439 

WILLIAM HOWARD CHINN 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 447 

INDEX 461 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



VI 



AUTHOR/EDITOR 




Picture courtesy GlamourShots, Clackamus, Oregon 

The author and editor, Merry Foster Shaw, has more than 
40 years experience in genealogy research and history 
compilation. Concurrently, she was a professional secretary 
where she gained invaluable experience in writing and document 
compilation. Ms. Shaw is a direct descendant of Hans Christian 
Peter Wilhelm (Bill) and Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen Madsen. 
Ms. Shaw currently resides in Texas, and may be contacted at: 
texassha w @ hotmail. com . 



vn 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



VIII 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



Special thanks to all those who generously shared the results of 
years of research. Much of that research was performed by Leola 
Merlyn Rich Powell, Stella Maxine Douglass Trout, and Richard 
Douglas Piquet. 

A great debt of gratitude is owed to those who willingly contributed 
information for their own chapters and/or those of their loved ones. 
And also to those who trusted me with their precious photographs 
and other documents. 

Some of the funding for this endeavor was provided through the 
generosity of various family members. Rather than name those who 
have contributed, suffice it to say that their support is greatly 
appreciated. 

Thanks also to my niece, Mary Margaret Montgomery Kaelin, for 
proofreading each chapter in an effort to minimize errors. Also, a 
huge thank you to those who provided encouragement, enthusiasm 
for the work, and love. 

And most important, I express my deep gratitude to our Heavenly 
Father for blessing me with talents appropriate to complete this 
work. If there are any doubts that this work is a blessed endeavor, 
read the testimony of my niece, Mary Margaret Montgomery Kaelin: 

(Mary) "Did you know that the angels draw my eyes to any of the 

mistakes I find? Sometimes I am casually skim-reading along and 

suddenly my attention will be focused on the only typo in 10 pages! 

Letter to Merry Foster Shaw Someone says in my ear: Mary, look at this one! This is yet 

(Kaelin, Mary M., 2005) y 

another confirmation to me that this is the Lord's work. I love that 
I am contributing to the gigantic work you have performed for all of 
us, including all these sweet ancestors. " 



IX 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



DEDICATION 



This history is dedicated to all the children, grandchildren, 
and great grandchildren, yours and mine, who may read this 
book. May their hearts be touched with a knowledge that they 
are important to, and loved by, the ancestors whose stories are 
contained herein. And even more so by our Father in Heaven 
and his son and our Savior, Jesus Christ. 



Report in Ensign. 
(Neuenschwander, Dennis B., 1999) 



(Neuenschwander) "/ alone am the link to the generations that 
stand on either side of me. It is my responsibility to knit their 
hearts together through love and respect, even though they 
may never have known each other personally. My 
grandchildren will have no knowledge of their family 's history 
if I do nothing to preserve it for them. That which I do not in 
some way record will be lost at my death, and that which I do 
not pass on to my posterity, they will never have. A life that 
is not documented is a life that, within a generation or two, 
will largely be lost to memory. What a tragedy this can be in 
the history of a family. " 



King James Bible. 
(Malachi, Chapter 4, Verses 5 and 6) 



(Malachi) "Behold, I will send you Elijah the prophet before 
the coming of the great and dreadful day of the Lord; 

"And he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and 
the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite 
the earth with a curse. " 



XI 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



XII 



TERMS AND PHRASES 



listed here are some of the words and expressions commonly in use at the time our Madsen family lived 
n Teton Basin and other parts of Idaho. Some have remained in use but have acquired entirely different 
neanings from the original. Others were known only to that region and have been eliminated from our 
>peech patterns. 



\dam's off ox - a very old expression referring to 
the ox on the right of the team. Because it 
is poorly seen by the driver, it gets the 
worst footing. The saying, therefore, 
refers to someone who is clumsy or 
awkward. 

Barrow pit - ditch along the side of a graded road. 

Breakfast, dinner, supper - the three meals served 
each day. Comparable to today's 
breakfast, lunch, dinner. 

Breachy - as in a cow that is contrary or goes 
against the normal rules. 

Bunk - any kind of empty talk believed to be for 
effect only. 

Burn your candle at both ends - originally 
referred to wasting one's personal wealth; 
more recently; however, it refers to 
someone who works all day and plays 
until late into the night. 

Business or dirty business - referred to any bodily 
function and was considered 
unmentionable. 



Camp robber - any of the birds from the jay 
family. 

Carrot snapper - derisive term given to people 
from Utah. Derived from earlier period of 
time when the Mormon pioneers survived 
almost exclusively by eating carrots. 

Cut the mustard - to be able to, or succeed with, 
something. Usually used in the negative. 
Originated in the early 19 th century when 
it applied to something being the genuine 
article. 

Dad gummed - took the place of a lot of 
profanity. 

Daveno or davenport - comparable to today's 
couch or sofa, especially one that makes 
down into a bed. 

Duck bumps - a bristling of the hair on the arms 
due to cold or fear. 

Fairy - an imaginary creature living in the woods, 
as the "tooth fairy." 

Fess up - to confess to something or take blame. 



By grab! - Uncle Johnnie's favorite expression. 



Fiddle-sticks - to care nothing at all for an idea or 
to express annoyance at someone. 



Xlll 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Gall danged - One of Uncle Johnnie's sayings to 
avoid profanity around the children. 

Gay - refers to someone who is happy and 
cheerful. 

Goose pimples - see duck bumps. 

In hot water - in trouble, on the spot. Originally 
referred to the practice of dipping one's 
arm in boiling water to determine guilt or 
innocence. 

Jeepers creepers - one of many expressions used 
instead of profanity. 

Jockey box - glove compartment. 

Lard - rendered pig fat used for all types of 
cooking instead of oils, margarine, or 
butter. 

Lick and a promise - usually used when 
performing some task in a hurry or in a 
slovenly manner with a promise to do a 
more thorough job at some later time. 



Looking poorly - someone who has lost weight or 
is pale and could be ill. 

Looks like a sheet with two burned holes - person 
has reached the point of severe illness or 
paleness. 

Madsen family motto, or so it appeared by the 
level of cleanliness maintained by each 
family member: "Cleanliness is next to 
Godliness. " 

Mush - cooked breakfast cereal served with milk 
and sugar (if you were lucky). 

No ifs, ans, or buts - our parents used this to end 
all arguments. No ifs (no supposition), no 
ans (no conditions), and no buts (no 
exceptions). 

Not quite right - someone with a mental 
disability. 

Pioneer motto - a rule to live by for every 
member of the Madsen family: "Fix it up, 
wear it out, make it do, or do without. " 



Little shaver - a young boy of quite small person. 

Loaded for bear - Originally a hunting expression 
going back to the wild and wooly west. 
However, more recently it refers to 
someone who is very drunk. 

Look natural - as in "doesn't he/she look 
natural!" Refers to a deceased person as 
he/she lay in the coffin awaiting burial. 



Pot licker - usually, dirty pot licker. Dictionary 
says "broth in which meat or vegetables 
have been cooked." In our family it meant 
you were pretty worthless or in really big 
trouble. 

Queer - unusual or different. 

Set a spell - an invitation to sit down and visit. 



xiv 



Terms and Phrases 



Soda pop - often referred to in Idaho as "pop," 
but in many other parts of the United 
Sates, this carbonated beverage is called 
"soda." 

Spell - as in "had a spell." Referred to some type 
of illness such as fainting from pregnancy, 
menopausal symptoms or similar 
unmentionable complaint. 

Spud pit - winter storage area for potatoes (or 
spuds, tatters) created by digging a long 
narrow pit approximately eight feet deep 
and 20 to 30 feet long, roofed with 
timbers, which were covered with dirt to 
provide insulation and keep the potatoes at 
approximately 60 degrees Fahrenheit. 

Still - a distilling apparatus used to make 
moonshine whiskey. 



Took sick - anyone contracting an illness was 
referred to as "taking sick." 

Tow head - a person with very light blond, almost 
white hair. 

Tules - willow bushes or just out in the brush. 

Two bits, four bits, six bits, a buck - common 
reference to a quarter, fifty cents, seventy- 
five cents, and one dollar. 

Whey - fluid produced when milk sours and 
separates. Milk solids (curds) are then 
used to produce cheese or slowly cooked 
to make cottage cheese. 

Whipper snapper - a young person or an 
unimportant but offensively rude and 
presumptuous person. 



Suet 



ground pig fat used as a component of 
carrot pudding or other recipes instead of 
lard. 



Willers or whillers - another term for willow 
bushes or brush. 



Thrashing crew - group of men assisting with 
threshing the grain when it was harvested. 

Tied to your mother's apron strings - originated 
from a law under which a man might have 
tenure of property only by virtue of his 
wife, known as the "apron-string hold." 
Usually in this case the woman controlled 
the finances AND the husband, which 
often extended to the sons. 



xv 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




A view of the Teton Peaks looking across the Teton Basin from west to east. 



XVI 



INTRODUCTION 



This is truly a book of love stories. Our ancestors had a love of 
freedom, which brought them to this continent; a love of God 
and His Son, Jesus Christ, which inspired them to stand firm in 
their beliefs even though this caused an irreparable rift in the 
family; and a love of their children and grandchildren, and they 
did their best to provide for them during the worst possible 
times in these United States. 

Our story opens in Grundy County, Illinois, in the farming area 
near Gardner. Andrew Boise Hansen arrived there from 
Denmark in 1870, with his mother, sister and at least one older 
brother. Anna Marie Bersnip (or Persnick) left her homeland of 
Germany in about 1 872, and settled in the same farming area as 
the Hansen family. Anna Marie and Andrew Boise Hansen 
were married in March 1873, and began their family on a farm 
in Greenfield Township. 

At that time, Illinois was still in the recovery stages from an 
extremely divisive experience. Less than 30 years earlier, 
Illinois' citizenry suffered a serious conflict between many of 
the local inhabitants and a group of newcomers, members of The 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly known 
as Mormons). This was such a traumatic event in the lives of 
those involved that it was surely discussed with all newcomers 
to the area. Little wonder then that Andrew Boise and Anna 
Marie Bersnip Hansen formed such strong feelings against the 
Mormons. 

In about 1885, Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm (Bill) Madsen left 
his homeland of Denmark for a new life in the United States. 
He worked as a brick mason in various places arriving in 
Gardner, Illinois, sometime before 1893. Here he met and fell 
in love with Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen, the second child of 
Andrew Boise and Anna Marie Bersnip Hansen. Bill and Mary 
eloped to Utah where they were converted to the Mormon 
Church, thus setting the stage for the ensuing conflict between 
our Hansen grandparents and our Madsen family. 



xvu 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Our Madsen family struggled through two horrible world wars, 
two major depressions affecting every person in the United 
States, and a Spanish Influenza outbreak, which claimed 
hundreds of thousands around the world. Nature itself seemed 
pitted against these early pioneers in the Teton Basin and Upper 
Snake River Valley as some of the worst blizzards in history 
were recorded during the 1930s and 1940s. 

We continue our history with a chapter for each of Bill and 
Mary's nine surviving children, which explores some of their 
trials and accomplishments. Bill and Mary were also blessed 
with 37 grandchildren, of whom 34 survived to adulthood. 
Contained herein are chapters for 25 of these Madsen 
grandchildren. Every effort was made to contact either the 
grandchild or the family of each, and an exerted effort was made 
to gather facts, quotes, and pictures to make this work as 
complete, fun, and interesting as possible. Our apologies to 
those we were unable to include for whatever reason. 

The goal in compiling this history was to preserve the 
information collected and present it to the you, the reader, in the 
most accurate, concise, and readable format possible in an effort 
to pay homage to those whose stories are included. And to 
record these stories for future generations that these may not be 
forgotten with time. 

History and genealogy gathering are, at best, an inaccurate 
endeavor. There may be errors of omission or commission in 
this work; however, every effort was made to ensure the 
information presented is factual and pertinent to the individuals 
whose stories are presented here. 

Enjoy! 



XV11I 



Chapter 1 
STELLA MAXINE DOUGLASS 

AND 
LEWIS L. TROUT 






Stella Maxine Douglass Trout 



Information for this chapter provided by 
Stella Maxine Douglass Trout. 
Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Stella Rose Madsen 

Born: 25 Dec 1902, Hyrum, Cache, Utah 
Died: 19 Nov 2000, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 



Married: Charles Orrin Douglass 

Born: 1 Sep 1898, Smithfield, Cache, Utah 
Died: 20 Jun 1986, Cache, Teton, Idaho 



Stella Maxine Douglass 

Born: 10 Mar 1 923, Cache, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Lewis L. Trout 

Born: 6 Mar 1910, Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Died: 30 May 1995, Provo, Utah, Utah 



Stella Darleen Trout 

Born: 10 Mar 1944, Houston, Harris, Texas 
Died: Living 



Ronald Vernice Trout 

Born: 9 Feb 1947, Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Steven Lewis Trout 

Born: 27 Mar 1950, Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Larry Dean Trout 

Born: 22 Sep 1951, Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Died: Living 



David Lee Trout 

Born: 22 Jul 1958, Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Stella Maxine Douglass and Lewis L. Trout 



STELLA MAXINE DOUGLASS 



1923 



Stella Maxine Douglass 
born March 10, 1923. 

Stella Maxine (Douglass) Trout. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2004) 

C. Orrin Douglass 

in "The Madsen Family." 

(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 




Stella Maxine at about two months 

old. 



Orrin Vernice Douglass 
born September 4, 1924. 

C. Orrin Douglass 

in "The Madsen Family." 

(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929, 

Beginning of worst depression 

in decades. 



(Maxine) "I was born at my grandparents's home in Cache, 
Teton County, Idaho, on March 10, 1923. My parents are 
Charles Orrin and Stella Rose Madsen Douglass." 

(Orrin) "We were killing hogs on the day Maxine was born. It 
was blizzarding real bad. We called for Dr. Martin but it was 
blizzarding so hard, Johnnie and I had to hook up a team and go 
meet him. His team was give out from bucking the snow; it was 
belly deep. The doctor was coming from Driggs. Stella Maxine 
Douglass was born feet first on March 10, 1923." 

Orrin and Stella Douglass moved to Glenns Ferry, Idaho, shortly 
after Maxine was born where Orrin found work in the 
roundhouse doing machinist work for the Union Pacific 
Railroad. 

(Orrin) "On September 4, 1924, Orrin Vernice Douglass was 
born. It was wash day and Stella was washing clothes on the 
board. One of the neighbors, Eddie Bostic, came to the shop 
and said I was needed at home. Dr. Davis delivered Vernice. 

"In the spring of 1929, we decided to move back to Teton Basin. 
I built a two-wheel trailer with a chicken-wire cover to haul our 
chickens and dog, Anna Bell. We left before daylight one 
morning and arrived in Idaho Falls about 5:30 p.m. We stayed 
the night with Nell and George Standen. The next day we drove 
on to Teton Basin through Canyon Creek. (This was before the 
bridge was built so the road went down steeply into the canyon 
and just as steeply up the other side, which really scared 
Maxine.) We arrived at Bill and Mary Madsen's about 3:00 in 
the afternoon. 



Lena Bene Douglass 
born November 17, 1929. 



"On November 17, 1929, Lena Ilene Douglass was born. 
Dr. Parkinson and Sophia Meikle helped. When our furniture 
and cows arrived on the train, we settled down in the house 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



ite 



* » 




Stella Maxine about six years old. 

Various. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002-2003) 



called the Grandma Moffat place in Cache. We stayed here 
until the fall of 1930. 

"Maxine started first grade in the Cache School." 

(Maxine) "When we moved back to the Basin, Uncle Johnnie 
came to stay with us. We had three beds set up: one for Mom 
and Dad, one for Uncle Johnnie, and one for us kids. Uncle 
Johnnie was quite young and liked to party. One night he came 
home quite late and very plastered. He was carrying a lantern 
and came into the bedroom swinging the lantern around his 
head. He gave it one good swing and the light went out. He 
said, 'Now I'm in the dark,' and fell into bed. 



Erma Geneal Douglass 
born August 2, 1931. 



"In 1931, our family moved into the Madsen home. My 
youngest sister, Erma Geneal Douglass, was born there on 
August 2, 1931. It was while we were living in Grandma's 
house that I was baptized in the Swamp Ditch, which was close 
to the house. 



"The next spring, Ilene, Geneal, and I all had pneumonia. I was 
the worst and, with no doctor in the valley, the Bishop took 
Mama and me to the doctor in Rexburg. I had to stay with 
Grandma Madsen in St. Anthony where the doctor could visit 
me twice a day. I was worried about passing my grade in school 
because it was the last month of the term, but they passed me 
anyway. 



Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm (Bill) 
Madsen died March 7, 1932. 



"Grandpa Madsen came back to the Basin and moved in with us 
in his house. He decided he didn't like being in St. Anthony. 
He was quite ill and passed away March 7, 1932. Grandma 
came home for the funeral and decided to stay in her home so 
we moved to the Watson place. 



"Vernice and I were in about the fourth and fifth grades, when 
we moved to the Watson place. It was on the west side of the 
Teton River in a house that was just boards and colder than blue 
blazes. That winter we had severe cold and terrible snow storm. 



Stella Maxine Douglass and Lewis L. Trout 




The Cache School as it appeared in 

2002, when it was being 

remodeled as a home. 



I believe it got as cold as 60 degrees below zero. Vernice and 
I rode 'Old Hanner' (we always called her Nance) bareback to 
school every day. In order to get there we had to go down 
through the field and over the railroad track. We rode down the 
railroad track and crossed the Teton River Bridge, which was 
galvanized sheeting, had no sides, and could get very icy. When 
we crossed that bridge, Nance got so nervous about it, she 
would hump her back. To get to school, we had to ride nearly 
four miles. Grandma Madsen was the janitor for the school. 

"One particular morning, it was extremely cold. So cold in fact 
that Daddy brought our little calf in the house because its legs 
were frozen. My parents were firm believers in children being 
to school every day, so this exceptionally cold morning, we put 
on our long socks and shoes and then wore bib overalls over our 
clothes. On top of that we wore coats, hats, gloves, and 
overshoes. Daddy and Mama wrapped gunny sacks around our 
legs and feet and tied them on with binder twine. Scarves were 
wrapped over our faces and then Daddy put a quilt on Nance's 
back and put us on that. He got on the other horse, Babe, and 
led us to school. 



"When we got to school, Grandma Madsen already had the fires 
going knowing us kids would be coming. By the time we got 
there, both of us were crying because we were so cold. 
Grandma and Daddy took us into the school immediately and 
rubbed our hands and feet with snow to pull the frost out. 
That's when Grandma said, 'No more of this! You '11 stay with 
me here near the school until the weather gets better. ' 



"Vernice stayed after school and helped chop wood and haul 
coal so everything would be ready for the next morning. He 
also cleaned erasers and did other chores to help Grandma. The 
folks came on weekends and took us home. One weekend the 
blizzard was so bad that, when we got to Grandma's house, 
Daddy pulled the team right up by the door and let us go in the 
house. 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"Then he put the team in the barn and we all spent the night at 
Grandma's. The next morning the sun was shining but it was 
very cold. We got in the sleigh and drove back home. Daddy 
had us stay in the sleigh until he got in the house and got the fire 
going. When we walked in, there was a big pile of snow on the 
living room floor that had blown in overnight. 

"While we lived at the Watson place, Vernice and I slept on the 
day bed in the living room and Ilene slept in the crib. It got so 
cold in the house at night that, one night, Ilene got her nose 
frozen in the crib. She slept with Mama and Daddy the rest of 
the winter. 

"The next year, Howard Sortor talked Daddy into moving to 
Sugar City to work. He couldn't find work and was forced to 
return to the Basin. He visited us every other week or so. He 
finally found work in the Basin. 

"I attended grades one through eight in the Cache School. It 
was a little two-room schoolhouse. I was fortunate to be able to 
attend high school and participated in Glee Club and band. 
Music was always a big part of my life beginning when I was 
four or five years old. My brother, Vernice, and I did a lot of 
singing together. 

"We continued to move about from farm to farm and, finally, we 
moved into the log house on our home place. It had a living 
room, one bedroom, and a kitchen. We lived in it quite some 
time until the rest of it could be finished. This is the house we 
were living in when it burned down in the spring of 1940." 

Maxine's father planned to build a larger home, and Vernice and 
Maxine spent the summer of 1939, digging a basement. When 
it became too deep for them to work on, Orrin completed it with 
horse and scoop. Then he squared it up with logs. 



Stella Maxine Douglass and Lewis L. Trout 

"When the log house burned to the ground, Orrin concentrated 
on completing the new home over the basement. Vernice was 
assigned to get the grain planted that spring. 

"Our house wasn't entirely finished when we moved in. The 
windows weren't even in yet. The logs were squared off with 
space left for windows. We lived in it like this during that 
summer until Daddy could get it finished." 

Maxine's grandmother, Mary Madsen kept a diary for at least 
one year of her life. Maxine is mentioned during the summer of 
1941: 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 



(Mary) Saturday, August 23: "Maxine is coming sometime 
tonight." 



Sunday, August 24: "Maxine did not come until this morning. 
Lavina and Marge came last night. Lavina went home and 
Marge stayed. Maxine and I went home. Went over to Amy 's a 
little while. " 



United States at war 

with Germany when Japanese 

bomb Pearl Harbor on 

December 7, 1941 



Stella Maxine (Douglass) Trout. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2004) 



Wednesday, August 27: "I finished Maxine 's quilt top. Bob 
Daily came after Maxine at 8:45. Maxine went right home." 

"I graduated from high school in 1942 and moved to Twin Falls, 
Idaho, where I got a job as a clerk at the M.H. King store." 

In 1929, Luella Madsen, Maxine's aunt, met and married 
Wesley Trout, who was born and raised in Twin Falls, Idaho. 
They lived a few years in Teton Basin before moving back to 
the Twin Falls/Filer area. Maxine stayed with her aunt and 
uncle and it was here she met Lewis L. Trout. 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



LEWIS L. TROUT 

Lewis L. Trout was born March 6, 1920, in Twin Falls, Twin 
Falls County, Idaho. His parents are Lee Roy and Janette 
Gertrude Puckett Trout. 

STELLA MAXINE DOUGLASS AND LEWIS L. TROUT 



1943 



Stella Maxine Douglass and 

Lewis L. Trout married 

February 23, 1943. 

Stella Maxine (Douglass) Trout. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2004) 



(Maxine) "On February 23, 1943, I married Lewis L. (Lew) 
Trout in Reno, Washoe County, Nevada. He was a brother to 
my uncle, Wesley Trout. Lew was in the U.S. Army Air Corps 
and was stationed in the states. The world was at war with 
Germany and Japan but we were fortunate that Lew wasn't sent 
overseas to fight." 



Mary Hansen Madsen, Nellie Madsen 

Standen, Thelma Heath Standen, and 

Sandra Standen all 

died in a boating accident 

July 19, 1943. 



On July 19, 1943, Maxine's grandmother, Mary Madsen, was 
drowned in a boating accident on Island Park Reservoir. She 
had attended the Madsen family reunion the day before in 
St. Anthony, Idaho, and had decided to go fishing with the 
Standen family. This included Mary's daughter and son-in-law, 
Nell and George Standen, their son and daughter-in-law, Bill 
and Thelma Standen, and granddaughter, Sandra. The boat 
developed a slow leak and sank. George and Bill were the only 
survivors. 



Stella Darleen Trout 
born March 10, 1944. 

Stella Maxine (Douglass) Trout. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2004) 

Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 

Ronald Vernice Trout 
born February 9, 1947. 

Steven Lewis Trout 
born March 27, 1950. 

Larry Dean Trout 
born September 22, 1951. 



(Maxine) "Our first child was born on March 10, 1944 (my 21 st 
birthday), at Houston, Harris County, Texas. 

(Ilene) "In the fall of 1 944, my sister, Maxine, brought her baby, 
Darleen, to live with us when she was six or seven months old. 
I took her on many of my dates. The summer Darleen turned 
two, Daddy built a box on the combine in which she could play 
while we all worked in the grain." 

(Maxine) "In 1945, we returned to Twin Falls, where our four 
sons were born: Ronald Vernice Trout was born February 9, 
1947; Steven Lewis Trout was born March 27, 1950; Larry 



X 



David Lee Trout 
born July 22, 1958. 



Stella Maxine Douglass and Lewis L. Trout 



Dean Trout was born September 22, 1951; and David Lee Trout 
was born July 22, 1958. 



"On July 6, 1948, my marriage to Lew was solemnized in the 
Idaho Falls Temple. 

"I have been an active and faithful member of The Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints all my life and filled positions 
in many of the auxiliaries. One of my main interests was 
genealogy, which I taught for approximately 40 years. In 1966, 
my oldest son, Ron, completed a mission for the church in the 
Gulf States Mission. 



Charles Orrin Douglass 
died June 20, 1986. 



"My other interests and talents include sewing, knitting, 
crocheting, making quilts, and teaching others about home 
remedies for various ailments and illnesses. And I swim to stay 
active and healthy. 



Stella Rose Madsen Douglass 
died November 19, 2000. 



"Of course, music has always played a big part in my life. I was 
a member of the Sweet Adelines for more than 30 years. This 
group is a women's barbershop music organization. At the age 
of 81, 1 am currently an active member of the Treasure Valley 
Showtime Chorus in Boise, Idaho. 



"I'll continue to sing until they throw me out. And I try to bring 
a little fun and laughter into the group. One Easter, I brought a 
set of rabbit ears and, right in the middle of the rehearsal, I put 
those ears and a cotton tail on and sang 'Here Comes Peter 
Cottontail, ' while handing out candy from an Easter basket to 
the chorus members. 

"One of the greatest highlights of my life happened very 
recently. During General Conference in October 2004, 
President Gordon B. Hinckley announced that the church would 
build a temple right here in Twin Falls. I can hardly wait until 
it is completed. 



9 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"At this time my posterity consists of five children, 13 
grandchildren, 17 great grandchildren, and one great great 
grandchild. I've included their names below." 

Stella Darleen Trout married Errol Porter on July 3, 1981. 
Darleen worked for many years as a administrative assistant. 
They have the following children: 




Stella Darleen Trout Porter. 



Lisa Maxine Mason (Panos) Estrada was born February 16, 
1962. She has the following children: Tony Martin Panos 
III, born October 14, 1979; Alivia Ann Panos, date of birth 
unknown; Chalena Lee Panos, born August 26, 1982; 
Charissa Lee Panos, born December 29, 1987; Daniel 
Estrada, born January 11, 1996; Emilio Estrada, born 
January 3, 1997; and Michael Estrada, born July 9, 1999. 

Dana Rose Jenkins was born October 27, 1965. She 
married Duane Glenn Peters on December 27, 1983. They 
have six children: Benjamin Peters, born June 20, 1988; 
Jacob Peters, born April 25, 1991; Jessica Peters, born April 
30, 1995; Joshua Peters, born August 21, 1996; Rachael 
Peters, born January 3, 2001; and Rebekah Peters, born July 
15, 2002. 



Kimberly Lynn Oney was born August 15, 1973. She and 
James Tate were married December 1, 1995. They have 
one son, Salem Tate, born September 23, 2000. 

Cherie Lynn Porter (Errol' s daughter) is married to 
Armanda Contreras. They have two children, Cecilia 
Victoria Contreras, and Diego Contreras. 

Stephen Michael Porter (Errol 's son) is not married. 

Ronald Vernice Trout was born February 9, 1947. He married 
Judith Buchanan on April 26, 1969. Ron and Judy live in Boise, 
Idaho, where Ron recently retired from the U.S. Army National 
Guard with more than 30 years service. They have the 



10 



Stella Maxine Douglass and Lewis L. Trout 

following children and grandchildren: 

Melanie Trout Breinholt married Marshall Davis on 
February 16, 2001. They have seven children: Aleksa 
Davis, born October 24, 1991; Cortney Davis, born May 18, 
1993; Brooklynn Davis, born September 11, 1995; Nikolas 
Breinholt, born January 20, 1996; Kaden Breinholt, born 
October 1997; Derryk Davis, born June 4, 1998; and Ryan 
Davis, born December 30, 2001. 

Philip Trout was born October 13, 1977. 

Roger Trout was born October 19, 1979. 




Larry Dean Trout. 



Steven Lewis Trout was born March 27, 1950. He is an 
international ski instructor. He has one daughter, Rianna Trout, 
born November 18, 1992. 

Larry Dean Trout was born September 22, 1951. He married 
Nancy Davies and they have four children: Suzanne Trout, born 
February 25, 1980; Brian Trout, born March 31, 1982; Adam 
Trout, born January 17, 1984; and Lorena Trout, born 
January 31, 1988. 

David Lee Trout was born July 22, 1958. David has two 
children: Lee Trout, born December 25, 1979; and Alexis Trout, 
born March 8, 1980. David (known as Trapper) lives in Haynes, 
Alaska, where he runs a fishing and hunting operation. 



11 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 





Mary Madsen (above left) holding her granddaughter, Stella Maxine Douglass when she was just a 
few months old. Stella Maxine (above right) at age six months when she learned to sit up alone. 





TMt 



m 



W^r^T 








Cousins playing on 
a warm summer 
day. Joy Rathjens 
(far left) was 2 
years 9 months old 
and her cousin, 
Stella Maxine, was 
3 years old. 
Maxine is holding 
her doll. The dog's 
name is in 
parenthesis but is 
not legible. Circa 
1920. Courtesy 
Merry F. Shaw. 



12 



Steila Maxine Douglass and Lewis L. Trout 



x c/u j jy 



Six generation 




Stella Douglass Maxine Trout 

The Stella Rose Douglass family 
is proud to boast six generations. 

Stella, 97, has a daughter, Maxine 
Trout of Twin Falls. Maxine's daugh- 
ter is Darlene Porter of Orem, Utah. 
Darlene's daughter is Lisa Panos of 
Pleasant Grove, Utah. Lisa's son is 
Marty Panos of El Paso, Texas, and 
he is pleased to announce the birth of 
his daughter Aiivia Ann Panos. 

Stella has lived in Teton Valley 
most of her life. As a small child, she 
grew up in Horseshoe Canyon in the 
coal mine town of Sam. Her dad 
homesteaded down in the Valley and 
farmed in Cache near Tetonia. 

She married Orrin Douglass in 
1922 in Driggs. Stella raised chickens 
and sold the eggs to the Economy 
Grocery Store and to other people in 




Darlene Porter 



Lisa Panos 




Marty Panos Aiivia Ann Panos 

the Valley for years. They raised one 
son and three daughters in Cache. 
They are: Vernice Douglass, Maxine 
Trout, Ilene Piquet and Geneal Full- 
mer, They have 20 grandchildren, 63 
great-grandchildren, 22 great-great 
grandchildren and one great-great- 
great grandchild. 



Six living generations is a very rare occurrence but one which Stella Douglass, Maxine Trout, and 
their descendants achieved. The above newspaper clipping was printed in 2000. Courtesy Maxine 
Douglass Trout. 



13 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




This photograph (above) of the Douglass family was taken in 1984, just two years before Orrin 
Douglass passed away. Front row, L to R: Orrin Douglass, Stella Douglass, and Maxine Trout. 
Back row, L to R: Ilene Piquet, Vernice Douglass, and Geneal Fullmer. Photo courtesy Ilene 
Douglass Piquet. 




First and second cousins meet 
at the home of Judy Gillies in 
Boise, Idaho. At left, L to R: 
David Gillies, Merry Foster 
Shaw, Larry Dean Trout, 
Maxine Douglass Trout, Judy 
Sortor Gillies, Shana Foster 
Montgomery, Jodi Foster 
Fife, and Jennifer Fife Bell. 
Circa 2004. Courtesy Merry 
F. Shaw. 



14 



Stella Maxine Douglass and Lewis L. Trout 




Maxine Douglass Trout is pictured above with (L to R) her daughter-in-law, Judy Buchanan Trout, 
son, Larry Dean Trout, and his wife, Nancy Davies Trout. Judy is married to Ron Trout. Circa 
Spring 2004. Courtesy Merry F. Shaw. 




The Madsen family reunion was held in July 2004, at the Teton City Park. Shown above, L to R, 
are: Geneal Douglass Fullmer, Ilene Douglass Piquet, Darleen Trout Porter, Maxine Douglass 
Trout, and Karla Piquet Denning. Courtesy Merry F. Shaw. 



15 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



16 



Chapter 2 
ORRIN VERNICE DOUGLAS 

AND 
DOROTHY WILSON CHQULES 

Vernice and Dorothy Douglass (seated in front) celebrated their 50 th wedding 

anniversary in July 2000. Their children are (back row, L to R): Shayne and JoAnn Rammell, 

James and Roberta Douglass, and David and Marilyn Barbo. 




This chapter is based upon information provided by Orrin Vernice Douglass, 
Dorothy Wilson Choules Douglass, and Marilyn Douglass Barbo. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Born: 
Died: 


Stella Rose Madsen 

25 Dec 1902, Hyrum, Cache, Utah 
19 Nov 2000, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 




v 



Married: Charles Orrin Douglass 

Born: 1 Sep 1898, Smithfield, Cache, Utah 
Died: 20 Jun 1986, Cache, Teton, Idaho 



Orrin Vernice Douglass 

Born: 4 Sep 1924, Glenns Ferry, Elmore, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Dorothy Wilson Choules 

Born: 9 Jul 1929, Driggs, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Marilyn Kay Douglass 

Born: 28 Aug 1951, Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 
Died: Living 



James Vernice Douglass 

Born: 4 Jun 1955, Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Rula Jo Ann Douglass 

Born: 19 Jun 1957, Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Thomas Vernice Douglass 

Born: 22 Feb 1960, Driggs, Teton, Idaho 
Died: 23 Feb 1960, Driggs, Teton, Idaho 



Orrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 



ORRIN VERNICE DOUGLASS 



1924 



Orrin Vernice Douglass 
born September 4, 1924. 

Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 

C. Orrin Douglass 

in "The Madsen Family." 

(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Vernice) "My parents, Charles Orrin and Stella Rose Madsen 
Douglass, were living in Glenns Ferry, Elmore, Idaho, when I 
was born. My birth date is September 4, 1924." 

(Orrin) "It was wash day and Stella was washing clothes on the 
board. One of the neighbors, Eddie Bostic, came to the shop 
and said I was needed at home. Dr. Davis delivered Vernice; he 
weighed seven pounds." 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 



(Vernice) "I have one sister older than I am: Stella Maxine was 
born March 10, 1923. I also have two younger sisters: Lena 
Ilene, born November 17, 1929; and Erma Geneal, born 
August 2, 1931" 



1929 



C. Orrin Douglass in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Orrin) "In the spring of 1929, we decided to move back to 
Teton Basin. I built a two-wheel trailer with a chicken-wire 
cover to haul our chickens and dog, Anna Bell. She was a little 
white, curly-haired pup. We shipped our furniture and cows by 
train." 



Various. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002-2003) 



(Maxine) "My brother, Vernice, and I did a lot of singing 
together when we were young. 

"When we moved to the Basin, Uncle Johnnie came to stay with 
us and lived with us for many years." 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 

Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929. 

Beginning of worst depression 

in decades. 



(Vernice) "Before I was six years old, I was given the job of 
leading the derrick horse, which was used to lift the loose hay 
from the wagon up onto the stack. Seems like that's all I did all 
summer. Me and my dog. I had other jobs, too! Bringing the 
cows in from the pasture, feeding the cows and pouring grain for 
them, chopping and hauling in wood, and carrying water to the 
house. Wash day was always on Monday and, I swear, Mama 
used more water than she needed for all that laundry. I think she 
washed the clothes three times." 



19 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



1930 



Various. 
(Trout, Maxine D.. 2002-2003) 



(Maxine) "The winter of 1929-30 was one of the worst winters 
I can remember. The snow was really deep and drifted and it 
was bitter cold. Vernice and I rode the horse to school and back 
every day. We were living on the west side of the Teton River 
in the Watson place at that time and the horse would hunch his 
back up and sort of tip toe across that metal bridge. 



"One morning we got up and it was 60 degrees below zero. Dad 
saddled his horse and one for us and put the sleigh blankets on 
the horses. Mama dressed us in our long socks, sweaters, coats, 
and hats. Then they heated rocks in the stove and put them in 
the bottom of burlap bags. These were tied around our feet and 
legs to keep our feet from freezing. We had several pairs of 
gloves on and scarves wrapped around our faces. Dad led our 
horse and off to school we went. 

"Grandma Madsen got up early that morning and went to the 
school to build a fire. She said she knew we would be there no 
matter what the weather was like. By the time we got to the 
school, we were so cold we were both crying and our feet and 
hands were frost bitten. Grandma and Dad rubbed them with 
snow to warm them up. I've never had such pain as when my 
hands and feet finally got warm enough for the circulation to 
start. That day there was another terrible blizzard and Grandma 
made us all stay with her. The next day Daddy went home but 
she insisted Vernice and I spend the rest of the winter at her 
house." 



Stella M. Douglass in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Stella) "My mother, Mary Madsen, was custodian of the Cache 
School and cleaned every afternoon. She had a bread mixer in 
which she mixed her bread all the time. It looked like a water 
bucket with a crank on the top. She mixed bread and went to 
clean the school about 4:30 p.m. Vernice and Maxine were 
staying with Mother because it was too cold for them to ride the 
horse to our house during the winter months. Vernice helped his 
grandmother haul in coal and kindling, clean erasers, etc. This 
particular night, he arrived home before her. The bread had 
raised over the bucket and fallen onto the floor. 



20 



Orrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 



"Wanting to help, he gathered it up and put it all back into the 
bucket and cranked the handle several times, mixing it all in 
together." 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 

"I don't remember anything 
of any value." 

Vernice Douglass 



Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 



(Vernice) "I always had a dog and I used to hook my dog to the 
sleigh or wagon and give Geneal rides. One time, I hooked the 
goat to the sleigh. The goat didn't want to go so I sent the dog 
to get the goat moving. The goat took her around the barn, up 
around the water trough, and down around the barn again. 
Geneal was hanging on for dear life! When the goat brought her 
up again she tipped over. Ilene and I ran over and quickly 
picked her up. She was skinned all over." 

(Ilene) "Vernice built airplanes out of wood and let me play 
with them if I was really careful." 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 



Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm (Bill) 
Madsen died March 7, 1932. 



(Vernice) "One winter we ran out of coal so Dad and I hitched 
up the teams to both sleighs and went to the coal mines in the 
West Mountains. The snow was deep and it was really cold. 
On the way home, we hit a blizzard and I didn't think we'd ever 
get warm again. Needless to say, that night I developed 
pneumonia. 



"Every spring, the women in the family searched through the 
Montgomery Ward Catalog and ordered new wallpaper. I 
always hated the wallpapering because I always got blamed for 
everything. Especially when the paper fell off the ceiling during 
the night. 

"I attended school in Cache, where I either walked or rode a 
horse. At recess we played chase tag because we had nothing to 
play other games with. Finally our teacher, Dan Leatham, 
bought us a bat and ball. At Christmas, we always put on a 
program with lots of singing. Nothing very exciting happened. 

"When I was in sixth grade, we moved to Tetonia and then later 
to Sugar City where Dad worked for the Sugar Factory. That 



21 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



job didn't last long and we only stayed long enough to get out 
of there. 

"I graduated from eighth grade but we didn't have enough 
money for me to go on to high school. The nearest school was 
in Driggs and the students had to move there and live in small 
cabins. I stayed home one year and the next fall Dad informed 
me that I would be going to high school." 



1940 



Orrin Douglass in "The Madsen 

Family." 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Orrin) "In April 1940, our log home burned to the ground. We 
had to build another before winter set in. The summer before, 
I had Vernice and Maxine digging on a basement and when it 
got too deep for them, I took over with a horse and scoop. Then 
I squared it up with logs. So that much was finished. We then 
built on top and had a bedroom, kitchen, dining room, living 
room, and front and back porch. Also, we built an upstairs with 
two bedrooms. The house burned down on Monday and our 
new house was all framed in by Friday." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "It was planting time when our house burned down. 
Dad said, 7 have to build a house so you '11 have to plant that 
grain.' I was a freshman in high school and Dad told me to get 
busy and plow and plant. We had 300 acres of grain to seed and 
I rode our old Ford tractor 1 5 to 18 hours every day until I had 
it all finished." 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 



(Vernice) "I truly enjoyed high school. I took some classes in 
Morse Code among other things. I especially liked music and 
playing drums. My favorite subject was 'band.' When I was a 
freshman, the band went to Grand Junction, Colorado, for a 
marching contest. It was a real honor for Teton High School to 
be qualified since it was such a small school. Our band was a 
hit and we were asked to perform that night. We were pretty 
good for such a little oP school. My favorite music was the 
Sousa marches. I still enjoy Sousa's music, especially 'The 
Stars and Stripes Forever.' 



22 



Orrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 



1941 

United States declared war on Japan 

December 8, 1941. 

Already at war with Germany. 



"The first two years I felt I was too small to participate in sports, 
but during my junior year I played full back on the football 
team. One night after a football game, I got a call from home 
telling me I'd need to walk home and milk the cows. So away 
I walked following the railroad tracks in the dark to get the 
milking done. 



"I was also a guard on the basketball team and we rode the bus 
to Idaho Falls for many games." 



1943 



"Word War II was still going when I graduated from Teton High 
School in 1943, and I was drafted. I got a deferment and stayed 
through the summer and fall to help with planting and 
harvesting of the crops." 



Mary Hansen Madsen, Nellie Madsen 

Standen, Thelma Heath Standen, and 

Sandra Standen all 

died in a boating accident 

July 19, 1943. 

Conversations. 
(Freeman, Joy F., Various) 



(Joy) "Our family reunion was usually held close to my 
mother's birthday, which was July 18. We met at the park in 
St. Anthony. Uncle George and Aunt Nell Standon stayed the 
night with Mom (Lavina) and, in the morning, gathered their 
things and said they were going to drive up to Island Park 
Reservoir to go fishing. They allowed Doris to stay with Mom. 
Grandma Madsen loved to fish and asked to go along. The boat 
developed a leak and slowly sank. George and Nell, their son 
Bill and his wife and daughter, Thelma and Sandra, were also in 
the boat when it went down. My grandmother died of a heart 
attack. The only ones to survive were Uncle George and Bill. 
It was a horrible and tragic experience." 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 



(Vernice) "I joined the Air Force on November 11,1 943, at Fort 
Douglas, Utah. I was attached to the Army. 

"I was stationed in Madison, Wisconsin, for six weeks. It was 
winter and we all felt like we were literally freezing to death. 
All we had for heat were wood stoves in the barracks. Finally, 
I was sent to Scott Field, Illinois, to attend Radio School (since 
I already knew Morse Code). This is where they meant 
business. It was an 18-month program. I had to take an aptitude 



23 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



test but I must have passed because I started school. Later I was 
asked to teach but I turned it down. I'd had enough school. 




Vernice and one of his buddies were 

home on leave in time for a family 

reunion. Shown with Shana and 

Merry Foster (L to R). Circa 1944. 




Vernice (second from right) and some 
of his buddies at Scott Field, Illinois. 



"The top students from Radio School were sent on to Radar 
School in New Jersey. Then we went to Boca Raton, Florida. 
It was 1 10 degrees when we arrived wearing our winter wools. 
There was no air conditioning in the schools. We were assigned 
to our airplane and flew every morning. It was so nice to be 
cool, we curled up on our parachutes and had a nap. I was very 
glad to be put on an air conditioned train and leave there. 

"My best friend, Richard Chase, and I volunteered to go to the 
Philippines so we were sent to California to board the MS 
Sloterjeick, a Dutch ship. The trip lasted 30 days. I was sick 20 
of those days and very sick 10 of them. I ran radar at night (you 
can't leave your post, even if you're sick). One day I smelled 
the bakery at the bottom of the ship. The chef fixed me a piece 
of whole wheat raisin toast and said it would help my stomach. 
He had me come back for two days to try and keep food down. 
It was fresh out of the oven and I've loved it ever since. 

"We arrived in Manila, Philippines, and spent Christmas in port. 
The Philippines was in destruction when we arrived-there was 
only one building standing from all the fighting. We loaded 
1,800 troops back onto the ship and returned to the United 
States. I received the Asiatic Pacific Theater Service Ribbon, 
the Good Conduct Medal, and the Victory Medal. 

"I was sent to the Philippines for battle but I never saw any big 
battles, the fighting was over when we got there. I certainly 
didn't miss it. I was lucky to not have any war wounds or be in 
the hospital. 



"I came back home and started working for Midland Elevators. 
I always wanted to farm and own cows and, in August 1949, 1 
applied for and received my own cattle brand: ' V-D.' 



24 



Vernice Douglass called as Bishop of 
Cache Ward November 1947. 



Qrrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 

"I had just started dating Dorothy Choules and, one day I see 
Stake President Choules outside, and I thought, 'They want to 
talk about that mission business again.'' So I went out. Now the 
Stake President was Dorothy's dad and he didn't know we were 
dating. So he says, 'We 're going to reorganize Cache Ward and 
you're going to be the new Bishop, so pick you some 
counselors.'' It isn't a good idea to put a single person in as 
Bishop. I used to have one of my counselors in whenever I 
interviewed the young women." 



DOROTHY WILSON CHOULES 



History of Teton Valley. 
(Driggs, 1970) 



Dorothy Wilson Choules was the fifth child and third daughter 
born to Albert and Rula Wilson Choules, early settlers in Teton 
Valley. Dorothy's father, Albert, immigrated to America from 
England as a young boy with his family. He attended school in 
Provo, Utah, and served a mission to England. Following his 
mission, he worked at several jobs and, in 1910, came to Teton 
Valley where he became interested in real estate. In 1917, he 
married Rula Wilson. They had six children: Lois Hoffman, 
Mary Harper, Albert, Jr., George Thomas, Dorothy, and Lois 
Tingey. In 1926, he began selling automobiles in the Valley and 
later established a dealership for General Motors. 



Dorothy Wilson Choules 
born July 9, 1929. 



Albert Choules served as Stake President in Teton Valley for 27 
years. He was then called as President of the Southern States 
Mission. After four years, he and his wife returned to Idaho and 
Albert was called to assist President Killpack as second 
counselor in the Idaho Falls Temple. Rula served as temple 
matron. They served in this calling for 1 1 years until Albert's 
health forced them to retire. 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 



(Vernice) "Dorothy Wilson Choules was born July 9, 1929, and 
grew up in Driggs, Idaho." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Dorothy and Vernice, 2005) 



(Dorothy) "When I was young, I had one cousin a year younger 
than me named Suzanne Wilson. We played together a lot, 
either at her house in Alta or mine. When I stayed over at her 



25 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




President and Sister David O. McKay 

visited the Teton Stake. Children 

scattered flowers along the sidewalk 

in front of the President. May 1963. 




TO BE OCCUPIED SPRING OP 1943 



-TAfcM I UOll 



Teton Stake-Driggs Ward Tabernacle 
dedicated on October 10, 1943. 



house, we often rode the milk truck to Driggs to play at my 
house and then rode the milk truck back. One day we somehow 
missed the milk truck. We decided to walk. In our young minds 
it didn't seem like that far! We each had a doll under one arm 
and a little suitcase filled with doll clothes in the other. We'd 
walked quite a while and gotten as far as the cemetery when 
along came Uncle Grant Wilson. He was not happy. He 
spanked us both and sent us back to Driggs. He stood and 
watched to make sure we paid attention to his instructions. I 
often tease him of giving me the only spanking of my life. 

"While I was growing up, my dad was Stake President and 
whenever we had stake conference, the General Authority in 
charge stayed at our home. We had all the church presidents in 
our home at one time or another beginning with President Grant. 
I have fond memories of all of them. Even President Kimball as 
an Apostle was in our home. My dad spent many hours with his 
office door closed in private conversation with one or another of 
those gentlemen. Surprising how many times I just had to 
interrupt to ask him some trivial question or other. 

"I graduated from Teton High School and was Valedictorian of 
my class. Then I attended a semester at Utah State in Logan, 
Utah. 

"My parents were good friends with the General Authorities, 
especially President David O. McKay. He was in office when 
my parents were called to serve in the Southern States Mission. 
I was only 20 at the time and Dad wanted me to serve a mission. 
I was eligible to serve if I was called to the mission in which he 
and Mom were serving, otherwise I would need to be 21. I 
didn't really want to go at that time because I was dating 
Vernice Douglass. 

"Dad obviously talked to President McKay about me serving a 
mission and one day I got a letter from him requesting me to 
meet with him at his office whenever it was convenient for me. 



26 



Orrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 

I called and scheduled an appointment. I had no idea what he 
wanted. We had a very interesting interview. He talked to me 
about what I was doing and how things were going in my life. 
Then he said he had heard I had a boyfriend. I admitted I did. 
Then he told me not to serve a mission but not to get married 
tomorrow. He instructed me to go home, get a job, and work for 
a while before I got married because it would be awfully hard to 
ask for that first dollar. 

"Then President McKay wrote a letter to my parents. I don't 
know what he told them, but they wrote to me and said it would 
be okay if I got married. Dad always said, 7 told Vernice to get 
married, but I didn 't intend to supply him with a wife! ' 

"I returned to Rexburg, Idaho, and worked in one of the local 
banks until Vernice and I were married." 

ORRIN VERNICE DOUGLASS AND DOROTHY 
WILSON CHOULES 



Orrin Vernice Douglass and 

Dorothy Wilson Choules married 

July 12, 1950. 

Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 



Orrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules were 
married on July 12, 1950, in the Idaho Falls Temple. 

(Marilyn) "Following their marriage, Mom and Dad moved into 
a small house in Tetonia and Dad continued to work for 
Midland Elevators. He also continued his interest in sports and 
was both catcher and pitcher for the Valley Baseball League." 






History of Teton Valley. 
(Driggs, 1970) 



Vernice was Bishop of Cache Ward from 1947 until 1952. On 
April 17, 1960, the Cache Ward was consolidated with Tetonia 
Ward. During this same time, Vernice was Clerk of the Board 
of Directors of the Village of Tetonia, a position he held from 
1955 until 1957. 



Marilyn Kay Douglass 
born August 28, 1951 



The couples first daughter was born on August 28, 1951, and 
they named her Marilyn Kay Douglass. 



27 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 

James Vernice Douglass 
born June 5, 1955. 

Rula Jo Ann Douglass 
born June 19, 1957. 



(Marilyn) "Dad continued to work for the grain elevator but 
dreamed of owning his own farm. He and Mom purchased a 
few acres located across the road from the elevator and moved 
their few milk cows into this pasture." 

During the next few years, two more children were added to the 
family: James Vernice was born June 5, 1955; and Rula JoAnn 
was born June 19, 1957. 



I960 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 



Thomas Vernice Douglass 
born February 22, 1960, 
died February 23, 1960. 



(Marilyn) "Finally, in the fall of 1959, Mom and Dad were able 
to realize their dream. They purchased a small farm and moved 
into the existing home. They spent many hours and a great deal 
of energy remodeling the house to include such necessities as 
running water and a bathroom! They did all the work 
themselves. During that winter, Dad built all the cabinets in the 
kitchen. 

"Mom gave birth to her fourth child on February 22, 1960. 
They named this little boy Thomas Vernice Douglass. He 
passed away on February 23, 1960. Mom was still in the 
hospital and too ill to attend the grave-side service conducted at 
the Cache-Clawson Cemetery by the baby's father, our dad. It 
was a very cold winter day. 



"Winters are always harsh in Teton Valley. One early winter 
morning, Dad and Jim went out to feed stock but returned 
shortly and asked Mom to give them a ride out to the ranch 
because the truck was out of gas. Mom was in her robe and 
slippers but they didn't want to wait for her to dress in warm 
clothing. She'd only be gone a few minutes! Right? They put 
the can of gas in the car and drove to the waiting truck. Both 
men jumped out of the car, poured gas in the truck, and took off. 
Dorothy waited to be sure they could get the truck started and 
then turned around to drive home. However, she hadn't gone 
far when the car ran out of gas. There were no homes in that 
area and no help along the way so she walked home in her robe 
and slippers. This happened on more than one occasion!" 



2X 



Orrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "See that tall cowboy-looking guy who just came in 
the cafe? He made moonshine up here for years and years. I 
saw him one day and said 'You wouldn 't happen to have some 
of your lineament, would you?' Next day he brought me down 
a quart bottle. Just a sniff of that would take your hat off. I put 
it in the drawer and never did use it. Several years later, he 
asked me how the lineament came out. I said I was afraid to put 
it on for fear it would take the hide off. 'Oh, no,' he says, 'It's 
a good thing you didn 't put it on. That heals from the inside 
out!' It was too dangerous to use on the outside." 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 




The "Douglass Guest Ranch" 
in Teton Basin. 



(Marilyn) "Dad has always loved horseback riding in the 
mountains around the valley, mostly in the West Mountains. 
Each summer he looked forward to spending time riding with 
his brother-in-law, Tom Choules. And they always took my 
brother, Jim, who rode his Shetland pony, Penny. 

"Each fall he hunted with another brother-in-law, Monte Piquet. 
They agreed to always say a blessing on the food. Then Dad did 
the cooking and Monte cleaned up the dishes. Dad often 
commented that it was the deer and elk obtained on these 
hunting trips that fed our family during those long, cold winters. 

"To this day Dad enjoys having Jim take him for a ride in the 
pickup around the loop, which consists of driving into the West 
Mountains through Horseshoe Canyon and out Packsaddle 
Canyon. 

"Dad was also very close to his Uncle Johnnie and spent many 
hours riding and working with him. They spent countless hours 
riding in the canyons west of Teton Basin. After Jim was big 
enough to walk, he followed his Uncle Johnnie everywhere he 
went. 

"In 1975, Dad and Mom built a new home close to their old one. 
My brother, Jim, and his wife moved in next to them. Dad's 
lifelong dream was realized. His father, his son, and he were 
ranching and farming together. My parents live in the house as 



29 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



of this writing. It has often been called the 'Douglass Guest 
Ranch' because of all the family and friends who love to come 
and enjoy their hospitality." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "My son, Jim, and I ranch together. We currently run 
about 300 head of cattle. That's why we need so much land for 
hay and grain." 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 

"When I worked for the elevator, we 

had lunch in this little cafe every day. 

They set up a table just for us." 

Vernice Douglass 



(Marilyn) "Dad continued to work for the grain elevator in 
Tetonia. Then he managed the General Mills Elevator, 
expanding it to include fertilizer, coal, bailer twine, and so forth. 
It was always clean and he prided himself on keeping it that 
way. During the winter, he could be found playing Pinochle 
with the other workers. They played so fast it seemed as though 
they always knew what cards the other players held. 



"My parents also joined a Rook card club called 'Country 
Cousins.' They received so much enjoyment from their 
association with friends over dinner and a friendly card game. 
However, it has often been said that Dad was quite the 
competitor and always wanted to take home the top price. 

"In October 1979, Dad was given special recognition for having 
purchased one million bushels of barley for General Mills. 
Then in 1986, he retired after nearly 40 years in the grain 
business. 

"Mom worked in the Teton County Court House for many years. 
She served as an assistant to three elected assessors. In 1983, 
she was elected Teton County Assessor, a job she held until her 
retirement in 1991. She was well respected in the court house 
and served the valley well. She often drove to the homes of the 
older residents to help them complete necessary paperwork. She 
established a good rapport with assessors from across the state 
of Idaho and enjoyed a close friendship with many whom she 
saw at the various meetings and activities." 



30 



Orrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Dorothy C, 2003) 



(Dorothy) "I finally started taking the keys out of my car when 
I walked out of the courthouse one day and my car was gone. 
I waited around and finally my car came back. Phil (one of the 
local men) had decided he needed to run home, so he just 
jumped in my car. The Sheriff told me it was time to start 
taking the keys and locking up." 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 



Charles Orrin Douglass died 
June 20, 1986. 



(Marilyn) "Through the years, Mom and Dad have been very 
involved in community service. Dad served on the Teton 
School Board for eight years and with the Agricultural 
Conservation Service for three years. He was also a member of 
the Teton Valley Saddle Club. Mom and Dad were big 
supporters of the 4-H program. Jim and JoAnn entered cows 
and sheep for judging and Dad often brought his horses to be 
judged as well. 



"Many times Mom and Dad donated stock to help offset the 
costs of producing the Tetonia Rodeo and, one year, they 
donated a tractor. Then in July 2000, Dad was named Grand 
Marshall for the Rodeo, following in his father's footsteps. 
Orrin Douglass was named Grand Marshall in 1985." 



Letter to Merry F. Shaw. 
(Whyte, Lavina M, 1987) 



(Lavina) "Ilene just called me and said Vernice is planning a 
Cache Ward reunion to be held on August 15, 1987. When that 
time comes, I'll see if I can get Bud to take me up there. There 
may be some old timers come that I used to know. " 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 



(Marilyn) "As with other veterans of World Ward II, Dad has a 
strong feeling of patriotism. In 1990, he spear-headed a 
patriotic program at Teton High School. He and Mom have 
long been members of the American Legion and Auxiliary. 



"Each Memorial Day, Dad can be found with other members of 
the Legion participating in flag ceremonies at many of the nine 
cemeteries in Teton Valley. 



31 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Memorial Day 1992. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1992) 



"On Memorial Day, 1992, Dad organized a patriotic memorial 
held at the Cache-Clawson Cemetery. Dad was the moderator 
for the program, during which he brought attention to the flag 
made by several of the early settlers in 1891. Because there 
were no stores in the valley, the material for the flag was 
donated by several of the local women. 



"As part of the program, Dad read a patriotic poem written by 
his granddaughter, Marianne Barbo. The program concluded 
with a rendition of the 'Ballad of the Green Berets.'" 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 



(Marilyn) "Mom and Dad began bowling in about 1979. Dad 
bowled on a singles league and he and Mom bowled on a 
doubles league. His highest bowling score was a 299! They 
continued this activity until failing health forced him to quit in 
1991. 



"Mom and Dad have been active members of The Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints throughout their lives. Some 
of Dad's callings include Stake Young Men's Presidency, Stake 
Missionary (which he loved), Ward Clerk, High Priest Group 
Leader, and on the High Council for many years. 

"Mom served as Primary President, Young Women's Counselor, 
and Stake Young Women's Advisor. She has taught in the 
Sunday School, Primary, and Relief Society. Her favorite 
calling was Ward Librarian. She loved being able to visit with 
the youth, teachers, and other ward members." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Dorothy C, 2003) 



(Dorothy) "Vernice went to Mutual with me one night and he 
was ready to go home before I was so he said he would leave the 
car for me. He did, but he took the keys with him. I went out to 
go home and had no keys. I waited until he got home and called 
him and told him I needed keys. I think he got in the pickup and 
brought them back." 



32 



Qrrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 



Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn D., 2003) 




Vernice and Stella Douglass. 
Circa 1995. 



(Marilyn) "Both of my parents love the Christmas season and 
always sacrificed to make it special for us, and the arrival of 
grandchildren made Christmas even more fun. They started a 
family Christmas party tradition, which included a yummy 
dinner, the 'left-right game,' playing carols with chimes, setting 
new goals for the coming year and placing these in white 
stockings. Dad always read the Christmas story, sometimes 
with slight variations to fit his teasing personality. As the 
family grew and changed with some of the grandchildren 
leaving on missions, marriages adding new members, and so on, 
so did the party. It was always such a wonderful time to gather 
in the basement around the large Christmas tree. 

"Time forces change but the Douglass home still sparkles with 
twinkling Christmas lights and all the red felt stockings-one for 
each family member-hanging in the living room. 

"Mom and Dad are devoted parents but enjoy the role of 
grandparents even more. They can frequently be seen giving a 
grandchild a ride on a horse, four wheeler, or in the pickup. 
There was always time for Twinkies and chocolate milk, black 
licorice, and Diet Coke. 



"Mom is a seamstress and used this skill to make all the clothes 
for her daughters as they grew up. She has continued to sew for 
her grandchildren, making beautiful clothes and quilts. She also 
made a quilt for each grandson who achieved the rank of Eagle 
Scout and each granddaughter who achieved her Young Woman 
award. Each child and grandchild also received a beautiful 
'family tradition' quilt as a wedding gift. These quilts were all 
made using the same pattern my grandmother, Stella Douglass, 
used to make the quilt given to Mom and Dad when they were 
married. 

"Dad always used to tease Mom about whether she had enough 
fabric. She tried to be conservative with her estimate of how 
much yardage she needed. He would say that, whatever amount 
she was going to buy, she should buy more because they'd be 



33 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



back tomorrow getting more. Now Mom gets teased about how 
much fabric she has on hand. They say she could open her own 
'fabric store.' 




"Mom and Dad attended all the dance recitals, graduations, 
piano recitals, football games, basketball games, baseball 
games, track, school programs, baptisms, and every other 
activity involving their grandchildren. Dad is extremely proud 
of his grandchildren and is happiest when he is surrounded by 
them. One of his most difficult times was seeing a young 
missionary off. He is quoted as saying, 'We took one of our 
grandsons to the airport to see him off on his mission for the 
Church. After he left, I told the rest of them we had to quit the 
Church. I couldn 't stand to go through that again. It was just 
too hard. ' However, he did go through it again, as all six of his 
grandsons have served missions." 



Vernice at the Madsen reunion at 
Tetonia. Circa 1992. 



Jim and Vernice continue to ranch together and, recently, Jim 
bought the farm owned by his grandparents, Orrin and Stella 
Douglass. Vernice likes to visit the home and says it still feels 
like his parent's place. 



Conversations. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2005) 



(Marlene) "One Sunday in 1999, we drove up to the Basin and 
decided to stop by and visit Vernice and Dorothy. When we 
arrived, we discovered they were just getting home from Church 
where one of their grandsons had either reported his mission or 
given a talk prior to departing for a mission. The house was 
quickly filling up with hungry relatives and Dorothy discovered 
the oven was broken and her turkey was just as raw as when she 
put it in. Dorothy was quite upset and we didn't stay long." 



Stella Rose Madsen Douglass 
died November 19, 2000. 

Orrin Vernice Douglass. 
(Barbo, Marilyn I)., 2003) 



(Marilyn) "Because of his association in business, church, and 
community, Dad has been asked to speak at many funerals 
throughout the years. He always felt this was such an honor-not 
that he enjoyed giving talks-but it showed the great friendship 
these people felt toward him. 



34 



Orrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 



"Mom seems to always be in the background supporting Dad. 
She always helped him with whatever he was doing. Dad has 
had health challenges his entire life, and Mom has always been 
there and continues to be there for him. Her devotion and love 
for him is certainly an example for all of us to follow." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Dorothy and Vernice, 2005) 



(Dorothy) "In 2004, 1 had surgery to place a shunt in my head 
to relieve my headaches. They shaved my head and when my 
hair grew back it came in bright white. I was just sick and hated 
the look of it, so I bought a brown wig close to my natural hair 
color. The first time I wore it to church, my son turned to his 
wife, Bobbi, and said, 'Doesn't Mom have that wig on 
backwards?' She told me later and I assured him it was on 
correctly. After that, whenever I wore my wig, he teased me 
with the same question, over and over. I finally quit wearing it. 
Besides, the elastic in the edge of the wig hurt where the shunt 
runs behind my ear. I tried dying my hair but it turned out 
orange so I just gave up and let it be white." 



Vernice and Dorothy's family consists of the following children, 
grandchildren, and great-grandchildren: 

Marilyn Kay Douglass married David Michael Barbo on 
September 3, 1971. They reside in Rigby, Idaho, where Marilyn 
is a teacher at one of the local grade schools. They have three 
children. 

Marianne Barbo was born August 13, 1973. On August 6, 
1993, she married Lane Dennis Virgin. They have one 
daughter, Madalyn Ann Virgin, born November 12, 2001. 

Michael James Barbo was born August 17, 1977. On 
August 23, 2001, he married Jennifer Ann French. 

Julie Kay Barbo was born April 5, 1979. On June 10, 2000, 
she married Ryan Edward Peterson. 



35 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



James Vernice Douglass married Roberta Lynn Bean on 
November 1, 1975. They live on the Orrin Douglass farm and 
Jim ranches with his father. They have three children: 

Brent James Douglass was born June 15, 1976. He married 
Tara Hill on May 7, 1998. Rylie Brynn Douglass was born 
June 2, 1999; Tawnie Lynell Douglass was born May 27, 
2001; and Zachary Brent Douglass, born August 7, 2004. 

Ryan Paul Douglass was born May 4, 1979, and on May 5, 
2001, he married Elizabeth Rose Perks. 

Robbi Sue Douglass was born June 5, 1980. On August 7, 
2004, she married Larry Adam Williamson. 

Rula JoAnn Douglass is married to George Shayne Rammell. 
They reside in Tetonia. They have five children. 

Douglass Shayne Rammell was born July 15, 1976. He 
married Heidi LaRee Purcell on September 25, 1999. They 
have two children: Justus John, born June 24, 2001; and 
Jerek Shayne born September 13, 2003. 

Gregory Shayne Rammell was born July 1 , 1 980. 

Lori Jo Rammell was born September 25, 1981, and 
married Jeffrey Brian Harris on August 17, 2001. 

Andrew Shayne Rammell was born November 24, 1983. 

Lisa Ann Rammell was born December 8, 1988. 

Thomas Vernice Douglass was born February 22, 1960, and 
died on February 23, 1960. 



36 



Orrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 



Class of Service 



Thi5 U ■ full-rate 
Telegram or Cablc- 
cram unless its dc~ 
ferrcd character is In- 
dicated by a suitable 
symbol above or pre- 
ceding the address. 



WESTERN 
-UNION 



1204 



A. N. WILLIAMS 
pneatotNT 



SYMBOLS 



DL-Dar leurr 



NL-NtuKr Ltuer 



LC-DcfcrtetlCsMc 



NLT-CsbU N*Sr Ui.cr 



Ship Ra Jtf>fcT3m 



The filing time shown in the date line on telewnnu. ami .lay letters is STANDARD TIME at Doiot of orinin. Time ol rei.ij>i >• -STANDARD TIME at point of destination 

GT 2 KL Tv 10 Sxtra dupe of tgm sent to Briggs Id; 

Hit efes Of© 

uccaraton Eielc Flo Sept 1 1945 

Orrin Louglass 

i'one 3045 letonia 

Happy birthcay i^adcy I am getting a delay enroute expect t- arrive 

Sunday love your ben. 

vernice. 

805 Am «ept 3rd 



THIS COMPANY WILL APPRECIATE SUGGESTIONS FIIOM IT8 PA' 



On September 1, 1945, Vernice sent a telegram (above) 
to his dad wishing him a happy birthday and letting his 
parents know he was on his way home. Courtesy 
Marilyn Douglass Barbo. 



Vernice Douglass (right, at left) and his Army buddy 
were home on leave in Summer 1944, and attended the 
Madsen family reunion. Vernice is holding Shana D 
Foster and Merry Lee Foster is standing at far right. 
Photo courtesy Merry Foster Shaw. 







37 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Orrin Vcrnicc Douglass graduated from Teton High School in 1943. Circa 1943. Courtesy Marilyn 
Douglass Barbo. 



3X 



Qrrin Vernice Douglass and Dorothy Wilson Choules 






Dorothy Wilson Choules was Valedictorian of her graduating class at Driggs High School. Circa 
1947. Photo courtesy Marilyn Douglass Barbo. 



39 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




On August 9, 1944, Dorothy Choules was 
recognized in Primary with an award (above left) 
signed by her mother, who was serving as both the 
ward and stake Bee Hive leader. Courtesy Dorothy 
Douglass. 



President and Sister David O. McKay (above right) 
stayed in the Choules home on those occasions when 
the President conducted stake conference in the 
Teton Basin. Circa 1963. Courtesy Dorothy 
Douglass. 



President David O. McKay on a trip to Wyoming 
with Sister Emma Ray McKay, his brother, Thomas 
E. McKay, and sister-in-law, Fawn McKay (at right, 
left to right). Circa 1943. Courtesy Dorothy 
Douglass. 




40 



Chapter 3 
LENA ILENE DOUGLASS 

AND 
MONTROSE PIQUET 




Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose 

(Monte) Piquet (left) on their wedding day, 

June 29, 1949, and (below) celebrating 

their 50 th anniversary 
in 1999. 



Information for this chapter 

provided by Lena Ilene Douglass Piquet 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 




Born: 
Died: 


Stella Rose Madsen 

25 Dec 1 902, Hyrum, Cache, Utah 
19 Nov 2000, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 




ir 



Married: Charles Orrin Douglass 

Born: 1 Sep 1898, Smithfield, Cache, Utah 
Died: 20 Jun 1986, Cache, Teton, Idaho 



Lena Ilene Douglass 

Born: 17 Nov 1929, Cache, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Montrose Piquet 

Born: 1 1 Jun 1928, Bates, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Richard Douglas Piquet 

Born: 19 Jun 1950, Driggs, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Betty LaNell Piquet 

Born: 15 Jun 1953, Driggs, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Karla Jean Piquet 

Born: 16 Apr 1957, Driggs, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Kolleen Marie Piquet 

Born: 8 May 1961, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Shane Mark Piquet 

Born: 4 Nov 1970, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 



LENA ILENE DOUGLASS 



1929 



C. Orrin Douglass in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 

Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 




Grandpa Madsen with Lena Ilene 
Douglass. Circa 1931. 

Erma Geneal Douglass 
born August 2, 1931. 

C. Orrin Douglass in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Orrin) "On November 17, 1929, our daughter, Lena Ilene 
Douglass, was born. Dr. Parkinson and Sophia Meikle helped. 
We settled down in the house called the Grandma Moffat place 
in Cache and stayed here until the fall of 1930." 

(Ilene) "My parents are Charles Orrin and Stella Rose Madsen 
Douglass. I have an older sister, Maxine, born March 10, 1923, 
and one brother, Vernice, born September 4, 1924. 

"I was born at home in Cache, Teton County, in Teton Valley, 
Idaho. I was named for my grandmother, Lena Amanda Sweet 
Douglass, but was always called Ilene. My mother said I cried 
a lot and they decided I was hungry, so my dad rode a horse to 
Tetonia for some canned milk. I guess that was just what I 
needed; they said the crying stopped." 

(Orrin) "After Geneal was born, we moved to the Watson place 
across the Teton River. The house was just a tar-paper shack. 
We had such a cold winter that year that Ilene froze her nose in 
the crib. From then on, she slept with us. When it was 
blizzarding, the snow came through the west door and we had 
to haul it out in the wash tub. What a place!" 

(Ilene) "I had a lot of curly hair and, when I was little, Daddy 
always had me sing whenever people came to visit. I was 
willing until I got a bit bigger and became too bashful. 



Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm (Bill) 
Madsen died March 7, 1932 

Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 



"Grandpa Madsen came to live with us. I was only two years 
old and he held me on his lap and taught me to cut people out of 
a catalog to play with. I can still remember him. 

"There was always plenty of work for everyone on the farm, but 
when we could, Maxine, Vernice, Geneal, and I played. We 
always had a dog and two I remember were called Bolly and 
Pup. Vernice trained them to pull our little hand sleigh and we 



43 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



had rides around the yard. Sometimes our cousins came to play. 
Vernice built airplanes out of wood and let me play with him if 
I was really careful. 




Ilene Douglass at age 11. 



"Daddy had a hard time finding work so we moved to Sugar 
City, Idaho, and I attended first grade at the Sugar City/Salem 
school. When I got to school that first day, they didn't have a 
desk for me so, much to Maxine's horror, I cried and cried. The 
next day I had a desk. 

"We moved back to Teton Basin the next summer and I attended 
second through eighth grades in the little two-room school in 
Cache. There were many excellent teachers. I learned to 
concentrate on my own lesson when the other grades were being 
taught. My eighth grade teacher was Lavaun Mickelson and I 
learned a lot from her. She is now 83 years old and still a good 
friend. Some of my friends in school were Anona Ard, Shirley 
Christensen, and Delene Baler. 

"My dad's careers were coal miner, railroad worker, farmer, 
rancher, and school bus driver. My mother was an excellent 
homemaker, gardener, and poultry raiser. She sold the eggs in 
town at the Economy Grocery Store. Mom also delivered eggs 
to people's homes. 



"Our house burned down on April Fools Day, 1940. Someone 
told us our home was burning and we thought it was an April 
Fools joke. No-one was at home at the time and we lost 
everything. After the fire, we lived in a sheep camp while 
Daddy built us a new house. We all had to help! 

"On July 6, 1940, Geneal and I were baptized by Bishop John 
Christofferson in the Teton River. I was then 1 1 years old. 

"During the summer, we put up hay for other people on shares 
so we'd have enough hay for our animals for the winter. For 
years I drove the derrick horse. As I got older, I learned to drive 
the Ford tractor with the bull rake, Geneal drove the derrick 



II 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 



horse, and Daddy stacked the hay. After a few years, Daddy 
bought a John Deere tractor with another bull rake, so I taught 
Geneal to drive the Ford, I drove the John Deere, and Daddy 
hired Ralph Moffat as a stacker. Daddy always said he was 
demoted to derrick horse." 



1941 



Ilene's grandmother, Mary Madsen, kept a diary for at least one 
year of her life. Ilene is mentioned during the summer of 1941: 



Personal Diary. 

(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 



(Mary) Wednesday, July 9: "Stella and Ilene stopped over on 
their way back from Salt Lake where Stell took x-ray 
treatments." 



Thursday, July 10: "Took Stell and Ilene in to the 3:30 bus 

today. " 



Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 



(Ilene) "When I started my freshman year at Teton High School 
in Driggs, Geneal was in the seventh grade. Like all students 
from outlying areas, we lived in an apartment during the school 
year. Ours was above the drug store. When I look back at how 
young we were, I wonder if I could ever let my kids do that. 
Times have sure changed. 



"The year I was a junior, the District bought an army truck, 
which was converted into a school bus. Now we could stay 
home. Sometimes that truck got stuck in the snow or mud and 
we had to help get it out, but it was great! 



United States at war 

with Germany when Japanese 

bomb Pearl Harbor on 

December 7, 1941. 



"Vernice was in the service during World War II so I helped 
even more on the farm: driving tractor, plowing, harrowing, and 
on the combine during harvest. We worked hard but always had 
a good time. On our first combine, Mom ran the real and Daddy 
sacked the grain. Mom always made us an excellent lunch. If 
I'd been out late on a date or something, I dozed off once in 
awhile, but when my dad let out a yell, I was suddenly wide 
awake again." 



45 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Mary Hansen Madsen, Nellie Madsen 

Standen, Thelma Heath Standen, and 

Sandra Standen all 

died in a boating accident 

July 19, 1943. 



On July 19, 1943, Ilene's grandmother, Mary Madsen, was 
drowned in a boating accident on Island Park Reservoir. She 
had attended the Madsen family reunion the day before in 
St. Anthony, Idaho, and had decided to go fishing with the 
Standen family. This included Mary's daughter and son-in-law, 
Nell and George Standen, their son and daughter-in-law, Bill 
and Thelma Standen, and granddaughter, Sandra. The boat 
developed a slow leak and sank. George and Bill were the only 



survivors. 



Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 

Stella Maxine Douglass and 

Lewis L. Trout married 

February 3, 1943. 



(Ilene) "The blizzards in Teton Basin were terrible in the winter 
and we were often snowed in. Many of our neighbors came to 
our place using their horses and sleighs because they knew 
Daddy always bought 20 to 25 sacks of flour in the fall and they 
could get some when they couldn't get to town. 





fi 



Ilene Douglass when she 
was a senior in high school. 



1«>28 



"In the fall of 1944, my sister, Maxine, brought her baby, 
Darleen, to live with us when she was six or seven months old. 
I took her on many of my dates. The summer Darleen turned 
two, Daddy built a box on the combine in which she could play 
while we all worked in the grain. 

"I met Monte Piquet while I was in high school. He worked at 
the Chevy Garage in Driggs and I worked at the soda fountain. 
After we graduated from high school, he came in often and we 
started dating." 

MONTROSE PIQUET 

Montrose (Monte) Piquet is the son of Augustus and Mary 
Martin Piquet. He was born June 11, 1928, at Bates, Teton 
County, Idaho, and was raised on a very rocky 80-acre farm in 
that same small community on the west side of Teton Valley 
next to the Big Hole Mountains. He was the youngest child in 
a family of eight. Monte had three brothers and four sisters. 



46 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 



When Monte was six months old, his mother took him by horse 

Monte Piquet. 
(Piquet, Monte and Ilene, undated) a " d bu ^ t0 V1Slt her br0ther ' Ed Martin > who lived in S P rin g 

Gulch between Wilson and Jackson, Wyoming. When she 
reached the top of Jackson Pass, Mary Piquet chopped down a 
pine tree of a useable size and tied it to the backside of the 
buggy. The pole dragging behind acted as a brake as they 
descended the steep mountain pass, a common practice. 

Monte attended grades one through eight in a two-room school 
house. There were four grades and a pot-bellied stove for heat 
in each room. 

Monte always had a love for riding and driving horses. When 
he was only about seven or eight years old, his dad let him 
remodel an old buggy with pine pole shaves and a spring from 
the seat of a burned-out Model 'T' Ford. He used a wool sack 
to cover the seat and create a cushion. His older brother gave 
him a horse broke to drive. It was his first experience as a 
driver. 

Once Monte got a little practice driving his horse and buggy, he 
was hired by many of the neighbors to drive the horses that 
pulled their farm machinery, even at the tender age of eight. 
When he was 12 years old, he got a job plowing for Fred 
Bowen. He plowed 80 acres with just a two-bottom, 14 inch 
sulky plow. It took six weeks rotating between 23 head of 
horses to complete the job. Approximately 10 of the horses 
were young green-broke colts that were harnessed alongside the 
older horses to break them for work. Monte was not allowed to 
stop for dinner, so he ate a sandwich and kept plowing. 

Monte bought seven Suffolk ewes from Bryce Rappeleye and 
started a small flock of purebred sheep. He sold the bucks 
locally and in the surrounding states. He kept all the ewes to 
build his herd. His goal was to raise and sell the highest-priced 
purebred rams at the national sale in Ogden, Utah. He 
accomplished this goal but never lost his love of horses. 
One day Monte and a friend were playing in one of the coal 

47 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



mines around the West Side Mountains. When they came out of 
the mine, it was already dark. As he ran, he stepped off the edge 
of the pit where the coal was dropped. It was at least a 20-foot 
drop. He was unconscious for several hours and had broken 
both arms. To relieve the monotony of having both arms in 
casts, his dad helped him get on a horse. Then he placed the 
reins between the two fingers and thumb he had sticking out of 
one cast and let him ride. 

During the last two years Monte was in high school, Irvin 
Murdock, a local sheepman, got permission to have Monte 
released from school to help with the spring lambing at his 
range north of Rexburg, Idaho. Later they herded the sheep to 
the summer range on Wolf Creek in the southern mountains of 
Teton Valley. It often took two weeks to drive them along the 
trail from Crystal Butte to the summer range. 

Monte graduated from Teton High School in 1946. He was just 
18 and, as the Second World War was over, he joined the 
National Guard and served for three years. 

While Monte was still young and somewhat foolish, he and 
some friends took a group of Boy Scouts over the Jackson Pass. 
Part way over the pass, they spotted a moose standing on the 
opposite side of the road. They crowded her against the 
snowbank created by the rotary snow plow. This kept her from 
running away, but she slipped on the icy road and fell with her 
legs under the car. They freed her and held her down while they 
decided what to do with her. They all agreed someone should 
try to ride this moose. Guess who was nominated? 

The moose tried to butt Monte off with her head and kicked at 
him with her hooves, but he kept a tight grip on her long hair. 
She headed up Jackson Pass and met a man on skis. Both were 
pretty startled. By now Monte was afraid to get off because the 
moose was both tired and angry. When he finally did jump off, 
the moose trotted down the road and jumped over a snowbank. 
Monte proved he could ride more than just horses! 



4S 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 



LENA ILENE DOUGLASS AND MONTROSE PIQUET 



Lena Ilene Douglass and 

Montrose Piquet married 

June 29, 1949. 

Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 



(Ilene) "Our wedding day was a very special day. We were 
married June 29, 1949, in the Idaho Falls LDS temple. My 
parents received their own endowments that same day and all 
my siblings attended and were also sealed to them. Monte's 
parents also received their endowments and were sealed to three 
of their children: Mattie, Newell, and Donetta. Later, others of 
their children were able to attend the temple and be sealed. 



1950 



"We bought a little house in Driggs and lived there until 
Monte's father passed away. Then we moved out to the ranch 
on which Monte was raised. His mother, Mary, moved into our 
little house in Driggs." 



Monte Piquet. 
(Piquet, Monte and Ilene. Undated) 



Monte worked as a mechanic and car salesman in Teton Valley. 
However, Monte took every day off work he possibly could to 
guide out-of-state hunters who wanted to come to Idaho to hunt. 
He also set himself a goal to climb the Grand Tetons. He has 
accomplished this goal three times. 



Richard Douglas Piquet 
born June 19, 1950. 

Geneal Douglass and Larry Ray 
Fullmer married March 29, 1951. 



Betty LaNell Piquet 
born June 15, 1953. 



Monte learned early how to shoe his own horses and performed 
this service for many of his neighbors as well. One night a 
young neighbor girl called him at 1 1 :00 p.m. to see if he could 
possibly shoe her horse so she could enter a competition at 8:00 
a.m. the next day in Burley, Idaho. Monte told her to bring her 
horse right over. They led the horse into a small tack room that 
had a 100- watt globe. The light was directly above the horse so 
Monte shod the horse mostly in the dark. Later the girls father 
told Monte it was one of the best shoeing jobs he'd ever seen. 
Monte also broke all his own horses. 



Lena Ilene Piquet. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 



(Ilene) "We stayed on the ranch for five years. During that time 
we had our first two children: Richard Douglas was born 
June 19, 1950; and Betty LaNell was born on June 15, 1953. 



49 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Karla Jean Piquet 
born April 16, 1957. 



"Monte's brother, Newell, lived in Ucon, Idaho, and told us 
about a farm for rent. We made a quick decision and moved in 
seven days. It was December 1956. Ricky was in first grade 
and wanted to be in his Christmas program so we left him with 
Mama and Daddy, and took Betty, who was three and one-half. 
I was expecting our next baby, which made matters even more 
interesting. 

"Karla Jean was born April 16, 1957. That spring, Monte began 
farming in the mornings and got a job with Elswood Pontiac as 
a mechanic where he worked an eight hour shift each day: 
1:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. After a couple of years, Monte began 
selling trailers for Elswood Trailer Sales during the winter 
months. He worked here for 14 years." 

During the summers, Monte arose at 1:00 a.m. three times a 
week and drove from Ucon to the Kilgore area where he 
serviced the well pump that was used to water the cattle and 
sheep belonging to Ed Philip. He drove back home in time to be 
at work by 1 :00 p.m. at Elswood. He kept this routine for three 
years. 

Monte joined the Jefferson County Posse and rode with them for 
three years. He also broke horses for many people, both to ride 
and as pack animals. Monte's favorite horse was a foal named 
Flash out of Thaddeus Toad and a Paint Mustang Monte bought 
from his brother-in-law. 

Monte had Flash for over 20 years. They were even featured on 
the cover of "Paint Horse Journal." Until that time, the journal 
had reproduced only paintings on the cover so Monte and Flash 
were the first photo used. The photo was taken at the foot of the 
Grand Tetons on the Skyline Trail in the Alaska Basin. 



50 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 



Personal diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1953-1957) 



Lavina Madsen Whyte kept a diary for many years and noted a 
temple trip involving Ilene, her mother, and sister, among others 
of the family. They attended the temple so some of the sisters 
could be sealed to Grandma Madsen. As evidenced in her diary, 
Lavina and her sisters kept in close contact with one another. 

(Lavina) Friday, May 10, 1957: "Anna, Stell, Amy, Ilene, 
Geneal, and I went through the Temple.'" 



Monday, July 15: "Stell and Ilene came at 9:30 and we went 
down to Pocatello and had dinner with Ruby. Luella was 
there. " 



1961 



Kolleen Marie Piquet 
born May 8, 1961. 

Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 



(Ilene) "On May 8, 1961, we added Kolleen Marie to our 
growing family. We now had four children, a small band of 
sheep, a rented farm, and Monte working at Elswood's all 
evening. 

"On December 15, 1961, disaster struck. Monte fell off a 
haystack and broke his back. He was in the hospital for two 
weeks before we could bring him home. They put him in a full 
body cast and we rented a hospital bed for him, which we set up 
in the living room. Kolleen was only seven months old and 
Monte took care of her the best he could. We'd put her on his 
bed when we went out to do chores. 



1962 



"In February 1962, a flood hit our farm. With Monte in bed, it 
was up to my 1 1 -year-old son, Ricky, and me to save 100 head 
of sheep, which were lambing. We got most of them into the 
sheep shed and, by filling up the pens with straw, we saved all 
of them. One ewe had her lamb on a high pile of manure and 
wouldn't budge, so we pushed her into the water and she swam 
to the barn. Ricky and I saved her lamb. 

"Later that same year, we bought eight acres just north of the 
farm we were renting. We bought a single-wide mobile home 
with a slide-out and set it up on our new property. 



51 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"Monte continued to work for Elswood Trailer Sales, farmed, 
and cared for our Suffolk sheep. 

"In 1964, we sold our mobile home and bought a double-wide 
mobile home. It was the first double-wide mobile home in 
Bonneville County, and the first all-electric home as well. 







At age 38, Ilene earned her license 
as a practical nurse. 



"Monte quit Elswood Trailers and worked for the Idaho Falls 
Fire Department. He was there two years and at the same time 
opened his own locksmith business. He had studied 
locksmithing through a correspondence course while he was 
recuperating from his broken back. He named his company 
Monte and Rick's Lock and Key, but later changed the name to 
Monte' s Lock and Key. 

"In 1967, I decided to take a course to become a Licensed 
Practical Nurse. I'd always wanted to take nurses training but, 
because of a lack of funds and encouragement, I never had. I 
completed the course and worked during 1968-69. In 1969, we 
opened our own travel trailer business and I became the 
bookkeeper. However, I kept my license current for many years. 



Shane Mark Piquet 
born November 4, 1970. 



"Our travel trailer business consisted of camper shells and travel 
trailers and then grew to include mobile homes as well. It was 
truly a family business with all of our children helping out in one 
way or another after school and during the summer months. 

"On November 4, 1970, we added our fifth child, Shane Mark 
Piquet." 



1976 



Notes from trip. 
(Powell, Merlyn R., 1976) 



In 1976, Lavina Madsen Whyte had a strong desire to make 
contact with her cousins in Minnesota. Her daughter-in-law, 
Merlyn Powell, wrote to the newspaper in Canby, Minnesota, 
and placed an inquiry regarding the family. Lavina received 
letters from several of her cousins who still lived in the area. On 
August 1, 1976, Lavina, Merlyn, Stella Madsen Douglass, and 
her daughter, Ilene Douglass Piquet, began a week-long journey 
to Minnesota. 



52 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 



They traveled across South Dakota stopping at Mount Rushmore 
and the monument to Crazy Horse. The Hansen family were 
very excited to see their Idaho cousins again. Many pictures 
were taken of the old farmhouse, family bible, and town of 
Canby. Everywhere they went, Lavina and her group were 
served lemonade, since they did not drink coffee. 



Various conversations. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002-2003) 



(Maxine) "They stayed with various family members while in 
Canby. One night they were taken upstairs and shown the two 
rooms in which they would stay for the night. Merlyn and Ilene 
stayed in one room and Lavina and Stella in the other. As 
Lavina and Stella were climbing into bed, they heard a loud 
crash from the adjoining room and ran to see what happened. 
The bed Merlyn and Ilene were sleeping in had broken. The 
couple they were staying with came rushing up the stairs. He 
said, 7 thought you fixed that bed.'' 7 did,'' she replied. 'I put 
pencils in it! "' 



Notes from trip. 
(Powell, Merlyn R., 1976) 



On the drive home, they visited the site of Custer's last stand 
and drove through Yellowstone National Park. 



Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 



(Ilene) "In 1 977, we sold our travel trailer business, and in 1 979, 
we sold our mobile home business and supposedly retired. 
Monte's goal was to retire at age 50, and he achieved that goal. 



"Mama taught me all the important housekeeping skills and I'm 
very grateful for that. I've always enjoyed quilting, 
embroidering, and crocheting, and have used these skills to 
make many quilts and other items for my children. I enjoy 
sewing and, as my children were growing up, I made most of 
their clothes. I've also made formal dresses for my daughters 
and granddaughters as well as many, many dresses, and 
bridesmaid's dresses. I told my children to start sewing their 
children's clothing when they were young and, by the time they 
got older, their sewing skills would be a lot better. 



53 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"I love flowers and I've always enjoyed gardening. Over the 
years, I've bottled hundreds of jars of fruit and vegetables for 
my family. 




Monte with six of his Paints 
and his stagecoach.. 



"Monte and I enjoy traveling together and have been all over the 
United States and to many foreign countries. We've always had 
horses and done a lot of riding, especially in the canyons west of 
Teton Basin." 

Monte was again featured on the cover of the Journal when he 
was driving his stagecoach with six Paints. He found the 
stagecoach in Beresford, South Dakota. He and Ilene went to 
look at it and bought it. It was only partially restored and it took 
a year of Monte's spare time to finish it. Monte bought six 
Registered Paint horses and broke them to drive. While at home, 
he drove a team of eight horses with two lined-back Buckskins 
he acquired from the Patterson Ranch in Montana. Monte felt 
if he could drive with eight horses at home, it wouldn't seem 
like he was driving much when he went to a rodeo or parade and 
only drove six. 



Monte had a good friend named Darrell Byerly, who rode 
"shotgun" on the stagecoach with Monte for many years. Monte 
owned the only registered six-horse Paint hitch in the United 
States (perhaps in the whole world). This was verified by the 
Paint Horse Association. He and Darrell performed in rodeos, 
celebrations and other occasions for many years until Darrell 
was killed in a fishing accident. His death was a major loss to 
everyone. After Monte lost Darrell, a neighbor boy, David 
Williams, helped run the stagecoach until Monte finally sold it. 

For two separate years, Monte was invited to drive his Paints 
and a vis-a-vis (a carriage in which two occupants sit facing 
each other) and bring Santa Claus into the Grand Teton Mall. 
Monte put inner-tube rubber on the horses hooves to keep them 
from falling or damaging the floor. 



54 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 



Personal dairy. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1979-1983) 

Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 



He has driven the same team along the Green Belt for seven 
years providing rides to tourists. He also used his team and 
carriage to provide rides for newlyweds at many weddings up 
and down the Upper Snake River Valley, as far away as West 
Yellowstone, Montana. 

Monte was asked by David Stocklien, a professional 
photographer, and Jay Hogan, to bring his stagecoach and horses 
out on the desert near the big butte, between Blackfoot and 
Arco. This was a section of the old Oregon Trail, which was 
used in the 1800s for travel and freight hauling. Monte made 30 
fast runs to get 2,800 pictures. Eventually the rights to these 
photos were sold to a publishing company in California. The 
last estimate we heard, there were 30,000 photos distributed 
world-wide. You may have seen some of them. 

(Lavina) September 4, 1982: / went with Bud and Merlyn to 
Tautphas Park in Idaho Falls, to Orrin Douglass's birthday 
party. " 

(Ilene) "Daddy was always such a cheerful and happy dad to 
us." 



1986 



Charles Orrin Douglass 
died June 20, 1986. 




Albert Ranier, III, Prince of 

Monaco, with 

some of the Crow people. 



On June 20, 1986, Charles Orrin Douglass passed away at the 
Teton Valley Hospital after a long illness. He was buried in the 
Cache-Clawson Cemetery. Stella never really got over Orrin's 
death and never quite forgave him for leaving her. 

In 1990, Monte was invited to bring four Paint horses from 
Cody, Wyoming, to meet Prince Albert III of Monaco. The 
Prince was participating in a celebration commemorating the 80 th 
anniversary of his grandfather's visit to Yellowstone Park when 
he hunted with Buffalo Bill and the chief of the Crow Indian 
Nation. Monte was assigned to drive the Prince in a 
Yellowstone coach, which belonged to Rawhide Johnson and 
had been on display at the museum in Cody. When Monte 
arrived, he saw that several planes had already delivered news 
reporters from over 80 different countries. There were also six 



55 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



outriders gathered awaiting the arrival of the Prince. When the 
Prince's jet arrived, pure bedlam broke loose. The outriders 
were all over the place with their frightened horses jumping and 
bucking. The jet was scheduled to cut its screaming engines for 
eight minutes to allow the Prince to deplane and pose for 
pictures. The jet's engines continued to scream! Monte kept his 
team under control, drove right up to the steps of the jet, and met 
the Prince. He commented later, "The Prince was a very nice 
fellow with whom to associate. " 

About 10 years ago, Monte needed to repair some of his harness 
and couldn't find anyone to do the job. So, he bought his own 
sewing machine and mended the leather himself. This soon 
ballooned into a new business. He began putting serial numbers 
on the new harness he created and, at last count, he had made 
203 sets of team harness and 50 single driving harnesses. 
Lately, he has even made several sets of lines for the Budweiser 
Eight Hitches. It takes approximately 500 feet of good leather 
for each team of eight. His work has spread to more than seven 
states. However, with all his success, his family believes the 
harness shop is just a 'man's hangout place.' 

A few years ago, Monte and Ilene traveled to Iowa where they 
bought 27 Hackney ponies and brought them back to Idaho. 
Monte selected six that suited him and sold the rest in several 
states. He has entered the six Hackneys in all competitions from 
cart class through six up at the Southeastern Idaho State Fair at 
Blackfoot and has won first place in nearly all of the classes. 

In 2004, Monte was inducted into the Horseman's Hall of Fame, 
located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. In 2001, he was honored as 
"Horseman of the Year" for his tremendous knowledge and for 
sharing his skills and knowledge with others; he was awarded 
with a large trophy. He has a wall full of trophies and ribbons 
he has won over the years from various fairs and parades. Many 
of these, he has passed on to his grandchildren. 



56 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 



Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 




Monte and Ilene worked at the 
Idaho Falls Temple for many years. 



(Ilene) "Mom (Stella) stayed on at the farm until June 28, 1994, 
when she broke her hip. She was 91 years old. Following 
surgery at the Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center, she 
learned to walk again and came to live with us. She looked 
forward to seeing Shane when he dropped by for lunch every 
weekday. We took her with us wherever we could. She always 
enjoyed going with Monte in the truck to haul garbage or when 
he drove the horses. 

"We still joke about how she never went anywhere without her 
purse and Monte packed her purse for her wherever she went. 
She went to church with us until it got too difficult for her and 
she no longer wanted to go. Mama was always pleasant and we 
loved having her with us. 



"Without the help of Betty and Karla, we could not have taken 
care of her as long as we did. She stayed with us until 1998. 
We found a great home for her with Corrine Schweider at the 
Riverview Assisted Living Center. She enjoyed many of the 
folks who lived there. There were also two Spanish ladies who 
worked there and they loved Mama greatly. Once in awhile, 
they put a little too much makeup on her (to my horror), but they 
loved her and were good to her. 



2000 



Stella Rose Madsen Douglass died 
November 19, 2000. 



"Mama passed away on November 19, 2000, in Idaho Falls, 
Idaho. She is buried next to Daddy at the Cache-Clawson 
Cemetery in Teton Basin. 



"Monte and I have always been active in the church. I've had 
callings such as Relief Society President, visiting teacher, and 
taught in nearly all the auxiliaries. I worked in the Idaho Falls 
Temple for 13 years. Monte has also had many callings 
including Councilor in three Bishoprics, Young Men President, 
High Priest Councilor, and High Councilor over the Physical 
Facilities Representative. Monte worked in the Idaho Falls 
Temple for 25 years." 



57 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"Dad really loves and Throughout Monte's married life, no matter what his goals and 

appreciates Mom." accomplishments have been, Ilene has been right by his side 

Marilyn Douglass Barbo. 

helping and supporting him. He 'really loves and appreciates 
her'. 

2004 (Ilene) "As of December 2004, our family consists of the 

following children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren: 



Lena Ilene Douglass. 
(Piquet, Ilene D., 2004) 



Richard Douglas Piquet was born June 19, 1950. He married 
Judy McEwan on June 1, 1972, in the Los Angeles Temple. 
Rick has his own accounting and financial consulting firm 
(Rorda, Piquet, and Besse) in Riverside, California. Judy is a 
homemaker. They have four children: 

Sunni Piquet was born October 7, 1973. She lives in 
Thousand Oaks, California, where she is a professor of 
computer architectural design at Moorepark College. 

Holly Ann Piquet was born September 22, 1975. She 
married Edwin Waite on September 4, 1999, in the Los 
Angeles Temple. Holly has a Bachelor Degree in nursing. 
Ed is a computer engineer. They live close to Rick and 
Judy and have three children: Amanda, born July 12, 2000; 
Jacob William, born December 11, 2001; and Joshua 
Richard, born February 4, 2004. 

Marcus Richard Piquet was born January 21, 1977. He 
married Yesika Acosta on February 17, 2001, in the Manti 
Temple. Marcus works as a financial consultant for Rick at 
Rorda, Piquet and Besse. He and Yesika live close to Rick 
and Judy and are expecting twins in August 2005. 

Kelly Jill Piquet was born January 16, 1980. She married 
Matthew LeFlore on August 2, 2002, in Riverside, 
California. Kelly is sales manager at Mission Inn. Matt just 
returned from Iraq where he was stationed with the Marines 
and has graduated from the Los Angeles Police Academy. 



58 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 



He has just begun a career as Sheriff. Kelly is expecting 
their first child in May 2005. 

Betty LaNell Piquet was born June 15, 1953. She married 
Larry Sautter on May 3, 1974, in the Idaho Falls Temple. Betty 
works in the bakery at Broulims and Larry works in Agri- 
Business. They live in Shelley, Idaho, and have five children: 

Travis Larry Sautter was born April 23, 1975. He married 
Brittnie Brown on July 17, 1997, in the Salt Lake Temple. 
Travis is completing his residency in podiatry in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. Brittnie is a stay-at-home mom to Cade 
Travis, born September 15, 1999, and Carson Reed, born 
January 3, 2002. 

Shelly Ilene Sautter was born May 20, 1977. She married 
Mark Hopkins in the Idaho Falls Temple on June 1, 1996. 
Shelly is a stay-at-home mom to Jared Mark, born 
August 12, 1997; Jacob Thomas, born June 4, 1999; and 
Samantha Shelly, born November 14, 2003. Mark is a 
heating and air conditioning specialist. They live in Boise, 
Idaho. 

Nicole Ann Sautter was born January 9, 1980. She married 
Ben Cook March 6, 1999, in the Idaho Falls Temple. 
Nicole is a Licensed Practical Nurse. Ben is in the National 
Guard and was deployed to Iraq in November 2004. They 
live in Shelley, Idaho, and have two children: Katelyn, born 
July 12, 2000; and Hunter Adrian, born August 28, 2003; 
and are expecting a new baby in August 2005. 

Brenda Rose Sautter was born August 19, 1983. She is 
currently attending school and working at Toys-R-Us. 

Todd Monte Sautter was born July 26, 1988. He is a 
sophomore at Shelley High School. Todd plays the 



59 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



saxophone in the school band and is on the football and 
basketball teams. 

Karla Jean Piquet was born April 16, 1957. She married Scott 
Denning on February 7, 1976, in Idaho Falls. On April 16, 
1997, Karla's 40 th birthday, she and Scott were sealed in the 
Idaho Falls Temple. Scott is the plant manager at Miskin 
Scraper Works, Karla is a homemaker, and they live in Rigby, 
Idaho. Karla and Scott have four children: 

Tasha LaNell Denning was born September 3, 1976. She 
married Jason Finn on August 29, 1997, in Rigby. Tasha 
owns a painting business and Jason works for HK 
Contractors. They live in Rigby and have two children: 
Kylee Joe Finn, born February 17, 1998; and Kiffin Jace 
Finn, born March 12, 2002. 

LaNett Marie Denning was born September 14, 1977. She 
married Scott Nield on May 31, 1997, in Rigby. LaNett 
works for a doctor in Idaho Falls doing the billing, and Scott 
is a foreman for KB Construction. They live in Ucon, 
Idaho, and have three children: Jaden Scott, born June 12, 
1998; Allie Rae, born March 27, 2001; and Gunnar Dean, 
born October 18,2004. 

Layne Scott Denning was born March 29, 1985. Layne 
works in construction and has worked in many parts of the 
United States during the past year. 

Joni Jean Denning was born January 25, 1992. Joni is in 
seventh grade and plays flute in school. 

Kolleen Marie Piquet was born May 8, 1961. She married 
Brad Jensen in the Idaho Falls Temple on May 3, 1980. Kolleen 
works in the kindergarten and is part owner of a catering 
business. Brad is a farmer. They reside in Gunnison, Utah, and 
are the parents of four children: 



60 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 



Christopher Ray Jensen was born January 23, 1981. He 
married Nichole Rosenvall on May 22, 2003, in the Manti 
Temple. Christopher is a manager at Nametag Source in 
Provo, Utah. Nicole is homemaker. They live in Spanish 
Fork, Utah, and are parents to Triston Ray Jensen, born 
November 22, 2004. 

Sheri Lee Jensen was born January 1, 1984. She is a 
student at the Utah Valley State College. Sheri married 
Austin Butler on March 11, 2005, in the Manti Temple and 
live in Provo, Utah. 

Camille Marie Jensen was born October 26, 1986. She is 
a senior at Gunnison Valley High School where she plays 
softball and is a cheerleader. 

Jason Brad Jensen was born March 15, 1990. He is a 
freshman at Gunnison Valley High School where he plays 
football. He is also quite a farmer with his dad. 

Shane Mark Piquet was born November 4, 1 970. He married 
Angela Staker on November 4, 1988. One year later, on Shane's 
birthday, November 4, 1989, they were sealed in the Idaho Falls 
Temple. Shane is a general manager for Hoist Trucking in 
Ucon, Idaho. Angela is a U.S. mail carrier. They live in the 
Milo area of Idaho Falls. Shane and Angela have four children: 

Shauna llene Piquet was born May 30, 1989. She likes 
horses and just got her driver's license. 

Kolt Monte Piquet was born September 4, 1991 . Kolt plays 
football and wrestles on his school teams. He is also active 
in 4-H with his horse. 

Brand Mark Piquet was born December 15, 1999. Brand 
likes to ride horses and go to Grandpa and Grandma 



61 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Piquet's on preschool days to spend the rest of the 
afternoon. 

Payden Rope Piquet was born June 1, 2002. Rope likes to 
play ball and can throw as straight as an arrow." 



62 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 




am 



Ilene Douglass graduated from the eighth grade at 
the Cache School (above left). She then attended 
high school at Teton High in Tetonia. 

Ilene is pictured above right in 1946 and bottom 
right at age 16 or 17. 

All pictures courtesy Ilene Douglass Piquet. 



63 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Albert Ranier, III, 
Prince of Monoco, 
(right) with several 
people from the Crow 
Indian Nation in Cody, 
Wyoming, to 
commemorate the 80 th 
anniversary since the 
visit of his grandfather 
to Yellowstone 
National Park. Monte 
Piquet was assigned to 
drive the Prince in an 
antique stagecoach. 

Pictured below is the 

antique stagecoach 

Monte Piquet restored. He is driving along the old Oregon Trail with his six matched Paints. Riding 

shotgun is Darrell Byerly. This photograph was taken professionally and used in many magazines 

and postcards. Photo by David Stocklien and Jay Hogan. 




64 



Lena Ilene Douglass and Montrose (Monte) Piquet 




The Piquet family in 1998. Back row, L to R: Shane Mark Piquet, Betty LaNell Piquet Sautter, and 
Richard Douglas Piquet. Middle row, L to R: Kolleen Marie Piquet Jensen and Montrose Piquet. 
Front row, L to R: Karla Jean Piquet Denning and Lena Ilene Douglass Piquet. Courtesy Ilene 
Piquet. 



65 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



66 



Chapter 4 
ERMA GENEAL DOUGLASS 

AND 
LARRY RAY FULLMER 




Erma Geneal Douglass and Larry Ray Fullmer with five of their children: 
Wynn Kay, Regina Ann, Dale Larry (behind), Merrill Douglass, and Mary Jean. 

Circa 1962. 



Information for this chapter provided 

by Erma Geneal Douglass Fullmer 

and Larry Ray Fullmer. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Stella Rose Madsen 

Born: 25 Dec 1902, Hyrum, Cache, Utah 

Died: 1 9 Nov 2000, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


V 



Married: Charles Orrin Douglass 

Born: 1 Sep 1898, Smithfield, Cache, Utah 
Died: 20 Jun 1986, Tetonia, Teton County, Idaho 



Erma Geneal Douglass 

Born: 2 Aug 193 1 , Tetonia, Teton County, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Larry Ray Fullmer 

Born: 16 Feb 1932, Clawson, Teton County, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Dale Larry Fullmer 

Born: 14 May 1952, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Regena Ann Fullmer 

Born: 1 Nov 1954, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Wynn Kay Fullmer 

Born: 6 May 1956, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Merrill Douglass Fullmer 

Born: 2 Feb 1960, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



William Sidney Fullmer 

Born: 10 Mar 1963, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Kenneth Lorin Fullmer 

Born: 1 Jan 1965, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Mary Jean Fullmer 

Born: 25 Sep 1957, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Erma Geneal Douglass and Larry Ray Fullmer 



ERMA GENEAL DOUGLASS 



1931 

Erma Geneal Douglass 
born August 2, 1931. 

Hans Christian Peter YVilhelm Madsen 
died March 7, 1932. 



Erma Geneal Douglass was born on August 2, 193 1 , in the home 
of her grandparents, Bill and Mary Madsen, in the Cache Ward, 
Tetonia, Idaho. Geneal was the youngest of four children born 
to Orrin and Stella Madsen Douglass: Stella Maxine was born 
March 10, 1923; Orrin Vernice was born September 4, 1924; 
and Lena Ilene was born November 17, 1929. Sophia Meikle 
came every morning and bathed Geneal and soon Stella was on 
her feet and able to handle things herself. 



My Memories. 
(Fullmer, Geneal D., 2004) 





M? 



Erma Geneal Douglass at age three. 



"Some of my earliest memories are of my grandmother, Mary 
Madsen, coming in early spring and staying for three weeks. At 
that time, Grandma Madsen lived in Idaho Falls and worked at 
the 'Sewing Room.' 

"When I was about four years old, Vernice hooked a goat to a 
winter sleigh and told me he was going to take me for a ride. 
The goat didn't want to pull the sleigh so Vernice sicced the dog 
on the goat. Away went the goat, sleigh, and me, screaming and 
bawling. I could hear Vernice and Ilene laughing hysterically 
as I held on for dear life. I often remind Vernice of this most 
unforgettable (and unforgiven) ride of a lifetime. 

"I also remember how much fun we had growing up in Cache 
Ward, particularly the ward parties. We always had a Christmas 
party at the church, complete with a play, followed by Santa 
Claus and everyone received a gift. One of the things that made 
it so fun was that the school and church were always so 
connected. The school put on the play and was also part of the 
ward Christmas party. We had a strong sense of community and 
we all knew each other and helped each other throughout the 
years. 



"We also had great Valentine's Day parties at the Cache school. 
We each decorated a box to hold our valentines and Mama 
ordered cards from the Montgomery Ward Catalog for each of 
us. We gave a card to everyone in the two-room school. Such 



69 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



fun. Schools don't allow this activity any more. I have fond 
memories of my class mates and of the Cache Ward. 



1940 



"On April 1, 1940, our house burned to the ground. Uene and 
I were at school and could see the house from there. We 
watched it burn. Mama and Daddy were in town at the time and 
nothing was saved. For the rest of the summer, we lived in a 
sheep camp while Daddy built a new home for us." 



Maxine Douglass and Lewis Trout 
married February 3, 1943. 



Mary Madsen, Nellie Madsen Standen, 

Thelma Standen and Sandra 

drowned on July 19, 1943. 



Geneal was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints on July 6, 1940, by Grant Christofferson. 

"The year that I was in seventh grade, Ilene and I had to live 
above the drug store in Driggs in order to attend school during 
the winter. It was awful! We missed our parents and family so 
much. The next year the Cache School was closed and we were 
able to ride the bus to school in Driggs. We were so grateful! 

"When I was a teenager, one of the Rudolph boys invited me to 
go for a ride in his open cockpit plane. Verla Jean, one of my 
close friends, and I climbed in and he took us all around the 
valley. What an unforgettable experience. 

"Much of my time was spent helping Daddy farm. I remember 
when we got our first Ford tractor. It became the all-purpose 
vehicle for the farm. I learned to plow, harrow, pull the drill, 
and run the combine. Whenever Daddy contracted to put up hay 
for others, Ilene and I became his haying crew and helped stack 
the hay. 



Ilene Douglass and Montrose Piquet 
married June 29, 1949. 

Vendee Douglass and Dorothy Wilson 
Choules married on July 12, 1950. 



"I attended Teton High School and dated several young men, 
including Larry Ray Fullmer. We met and dated for a time 
while I was a sophomore, but then broke up. I joined the school 
band where I played trumpet and, when I was a senior, I was the 
first female majorette in the history of the school. 



70 



Erma Geneal Douglass and Larry Ray Fullmer 




Lena Ilene and Erma Geneal 

Douglass. 

Circa 1946. 



"I also started dating Larry Fullmer again. I graduated from 
high school in May 1949. There were 30 students in my 
graduating class. 

"After graduation, I got a job at the Economy Cash Store in 
Driggs as a cashier and Larry and I continued to date. 

LARRY RAY FULLMER 

Larry's parents were Sidney Ricks and Merrel Hansen Fullmer. 
He was born February 16, 1932, at Clawson, Teton County, 
Idaho. Larry was raised in Teton Basin. 

When he turned eight years old, he chose to be baptized a 
member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 
Larry's baptism took place on July 27, 1940. 

ERMA GENEAL DOUGLASS AND LARRY RAY 
FULLMER 



1951 



My Memories. 
(Fullmer, Geneal D., 2004) 



"On March 29, 1951, Larry Ray Fullmer and I were married in 
the Idaho Falls Temple by President W.L. Killpack. There was 
a small group of family in attendance including Mama and 
Daddy, Monte and Ilene Piquet, Vernice and Dorothy Douglass, 
and Larry's Uncle Easten and Aunt Elda Hansen. We traveled 
to Salt Lake City for our honeymoon. It was my parent's 28th 
wedding anniversary. 



Dale Larry Fullmer 
born May 14, 1952. 



"Following our marriage, Larry and I rented a little place in 
Driggs and then built a two-room home near Larry's parents in 
Tetonia. It was here our first son was born on May 14, 1952. 
We named him Dale Larry. 



Regena Ann Fullmer 
born November 1, 1954. 



"Larry got a job for the Old Faithful Beverage Company in 
Idaho Falls so we moved there for a couple of years, and then 
moved back to Teton Valley. Our second child and first 
daughter, Regena Ann, was born on November 1, 1954. 



71 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Wynn Kay Fullmer 
born May 6, 1956. 

Mary Jean Fullmer 

born September 25, 1957. 

Merrill Douglass Fullmer 
born February 2, 1960. 



William Sidney Fullmer 
born March 10, 1963. 

Kenneth Lorin Fullmer 
born January 1, 1965. 



"In May 1956, we again moved to Idaho Falls. We lived in 
Bellaire, a suburb of Idaho Falls, for six years. Larry again 
worked for the Old Faithful Beverage Company. 

"While we lived here, we added three more children to our 
family: Wynn Kay was born May 6, 1956; Mary Jean was born 
September 25, 1957; and Merrill Douglass was born February 2, 
1960. Our house was becoming a bit crowded with five children 
under foot so we purchased a little bigger place in Ammon and 
moved there in late 1962 or early 1963. It was here that we 
added two more boys to our family: William Sidney was born 
March 10, 1963; and Kenneth Lorin was born January 1, 1965. 

"We attended church in the Ammon Second Ward where we 
both held many positions. My service included Relief Society 
President for nearly two years, Primary President, second 
counselor in the Young Women's Mutual Organization, and 
many teaching positions in primary and other auxiliaries. 

"Larry held various callings through the years in the Sunday 
school, young men's organization, and as a stake missionary. 
He also served for a time as ward clerk. 



"Geneal is a fabulous seamstress!" 

Larry Ray Fullmer 



Charles Orrin Douglass 
died June 20, 1986. 



"Mama (Stella) had a great talent for handy work: crocheting, 
knitting, and sewing. I learned from her! With seven kids, it 
was a necessity to sew in order to provide tailored clothing and 
keep them well-dressed on our income. I made dresses and 
shirts and knitted sweaters for everyone. I also kept busy 
making doilies and pillow cases for gift giving. My children 
claim they saw sparks coming from the crochet hook as I created 
hand-made lace. My favorite creations include the many quilts 
I've designed and hand-quilted over the years. Some of these I 
sold, but many were made for my family and friends. I created 
and hand-quilted a queen sized quilt for each grandchild as a 
graduation gift from high school. I've also made many quilts 
from used Levi jeans. Many of these were donated to the fund- 
raising effort at the Douglass family reunion where they were 
highly coveted items. 



72 



Erma Geneal Douglass and Larry Ray Fullmer 



"I worked for more than five years for Sprouse Reitz. During 
the Easter season, I designed all of the Easter baskets to be sold. 
I also worked for many years at General Mills while Larry was 
the manager. In 1965, Larry retired from General Mills and I 
took a one-week job at Albertsons. It turned into a 10-year 
career. One day while I was at work, I felt a sharp pain in my 
back. I was taken to the hospital where the doctors determined 
I had a softball-sized tumor in my kidney. Surgery was 
performed on December 12, 1996. 

"The good news was that the tumor was benign; the bad news 
was that I lost one of my lower ribs. I spent the holidays 
recovering, but on New Year's Day, I wandered out to the car. 
I was really not well enough to go anywhere and Regina was 
sick with an abscessed tooth. Larry found me just sitting there 
Stella Rose Madsen Douglass so he climbed in and we pretended to go for a ride. The entire 

died November 19, 2000. ^^ was S p ent looking over our shoulders to make sure none of 

the neighbors spotted us and thought we were crazy. I finally 
retired from Albertsons on June 6, 2002. 

"Mama (Stella) began a Valentine tradition that I love and have 
continued. Every year she baked cookies, frosted and decorated 
them, and delivered a box full to each of her children. After 
Mama became unable to continue with her cookie tradition, I 
began baking cookies for my children and grandchildren. In 
order to ensure there are enough cookies to fill all the boxes, I 
begin baking in early February. I make 10 different kinds of 
cookies, decorate a box for each child and grandchild, and 
deliver them all. My children look forward to their 'Valentine 
Cookies' each year. 

"Our 50 th wedding anniversary was on March 29, 2001, but we 
celebrated on April 15 at a wonderful party hosted by our seven 
children. Many of our family and friends attended. 



73 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



74 



"All of our children are married except Regena, who is still 
looking for Mr. Perfect. We have 21 grandchildren and, to date, 
1 1 great-grandchildren. Four of our sons and six of our 
grandsons have received Eagle Scout awards, and one son and 
five grandsons have completed full-time missions. We have two 
grandsons currently serving in the mission field. 

Dale Larry Fullmer married Betty Johnston. They have three 
children and two grandchildren. 

Regena Ann Fullmer is not married at this time. She works at 
the local hospital. 

Wynn Kay Fullmer married Teresa Pasley. They are the 
parents of five children and five grandchildren. 

Mary Jean Fullmer married David Bailey and they have three 
children and five grandchildren. 

Merrill Douglass Fullmer married Kendi Gerard. They have 
two children. 

William Sidney Fullmer is married to Jackie Roberts and they 
have five children. 

Kenneth Lorin Fullmer married Michelle Stanley and they are 
the parents of three children. 



Erma Geneal Douglass and Larry Ray Fullmer 




Erma Geneal and Larry Ray Fullmer with their seven children: L to R: Wynn, Mary, Ken, Merrill, 
Regena, Bill, and Dale. Circa 1991. Courtesy Geneal Douglass Fullmer. 



Geneal and Larry at the Madsen Family reunion (left) 
in 2004, and at the 50 lh anniversary party for Bud and 
Merlyn Powell (below). Courtesy Merry F. Shaw. 




75 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Famil 



76 



Chapter 5 
JOHNNIE WILLIAM MADSEN 




Johnnie William Madsen and James Vernice Douglass. Circa 1960. 



Initial information for this chapter 

provided by Maxine Douglass Trout. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen 

Born: 10 May 1876, Gardner, Grundy, Illinois 
Died: 19 Jul 1943, Island Park Reservoir, Fremont, 
Idaho 



Married: Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm Madsen 

Born: 20 Feb 1 864, Lystrup, Uvelse, 

Fredericksborg, Denmark 

Died: 7 Mar 1932, Cache, Teton, Idaho 



Johnnie William Madsen 

Born: 25 Feb 1905, Canby, Yellow Medicine, Minnesota 
Died: 3 Sept 1972, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 



Married: Bessie Chase Campbell 

Born: 27 May 1917, Rigby, Jefferson, Idaho 
Died: 9 April 1992, , Idaho 



Phil Campbell 

Born: 

Died: Living 


, 1935, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 




Noma Campbell 

Born: 

Died: Living 


, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 



Connie Campbell 

Born: 



Died: Living 



Lavon Campbell 

Born: 



Died: Living 



., Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 



., Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 



Married: Mary Olson Reynolds 

Mary Olson Reynolds had eight children. No names were available. 



Johnnie William Madsen 



1905 



JOHNNIE WILLIAM MADSEN 

Johnnie's parents, Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm (Bill) and 
Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen Madsen, moved from Idaho to 
Minnesota in January 1905, in an effort to better provide for 
their growing family. Johnnie's grandparents, Andrew Boise 
and Anna Marie (Mary) Bersnip Hansen, promised Mary and 
Bill they would provide assistance and let them farm the Fox 
place if they would move closer to home. Mary and Bill sold all 
they possessed and boarded a train in Utah with their four girls. 

Johnnie William Madsen Mary was excited to be moving back with her family again. 

born February 25, 1905. Johnnie William Madsen, their second son, was born 

February 25, 1905, at Canby, Yellow Medicine, Minnesota. 

When Johnnie was just a few days old, his grandmother Hansen 
demanded he be christened in the Lutheran church. Mary and 
Bill refused. They had joined The Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints while in Utah and could not be persuaded to 
denounce what they believed to be true. Grandmother Hansen 
was adamant and heated words followed. The result was a split 
in the family. 

Bill was forced to find work in Canby to earn train fare to Idaho 
and a living for his family. He walked the five miles to Canby 
morning and night during that winter and, in the spring, bought 
a ticket and left. It took until November to save enough money, 
over and above what he sent his wife and children, to purchase 
tickets for them. Grandpa Hansen took them to the train and 
bade them farewell, promising to come visit in two years. Mary 
never saw any of her family again. 

The family settled in Preston, Idaho, and later moved to Lincoln, 
Idaho, where Bill worked as a mason laying brick for the new 
sugar factory. The family shared a duplex with one of Bill's 
cousins, Hans Hansen, and his family. The children became 
good friends. 



79 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Bill was enticed to move to Teton Basin, Idaho, where 
homesteads for farm land could be obtained. In Spring 1907, he 
moved his family to that beautiful valley with the cold climate. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Amy) "In October 1907, when Johnnie was just three years old, 
he was jumping from one chair to another and slipped off. He 
bumped the back of his head; I guess it was a terrible bump. 
The next day he became very ill with a raging fever." 



The only doctor in the valley at that time was a woman named 
Doctor Ora Keith. 



Various Interviews. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., Undated) 



(Lavina) "The folks sent for the doctor but she thought he just 
had a case of rheumatism and did nothing for him. He was in so 
much pain and cried for days. I remember when he cried and 
screamed with pain, we walked far out into the fields so we 
wouldn't hear him because we couldn't stand to listen to him 
suffer. The folks sent for the Elders who administered to him. 
After he was administered to, the pain went away but he was 
paralyzed from the waist down. It was years before he could 
even get around on crutches. It is likely the disease was polio 
or spinal meningitis, but was not diagnosed at the time." 



Various Conversations. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002) 



I ml hs Viola Madsen 
born October 20, 1908. 



(Maxine) "Before Johnnie became ill, he was a very active little 
boy. One of his favorite games was to climb on the chairs 
arranged around the table and jump from one to another. One 
day he slipped and fell, hurting his spine. Mama (Stella) said 
the family thought this injury may have contributed to his 
illness." 



Johnnie's disability didn't slow him down for long. Once he 
learned to get around on crutches, he was up and practically 
running. 



Memories. 
(Shaw, Merry F., Undated) 



80 



(Merry) "When Uncle Johnnie was quite young, he had a 
difficult time getting around in the snow. He picked a sheep 
from his dad's flock and trained it to pull his sleigh. She started 
up on his command and stopped when he said. Then he just 



Johnnie William Madsen 



rolled off the sleigh and pulled himself up. If he happened to 
fall off the sleigh, the sheep stopped and waited for him to get 
back on." 



Various Conversations. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002) 



(Maxine) "When Johnnie started school, there was a young girl 
in his class named Bertha Larsen. She became friends with 
Johnnie and spent many hours playing with him. She had a 
wagon and pulled Johnnie everywhere in her wagon." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



Amy Pearl Madsen 
born August 4, 1912. 



(Vernice) "Uncle Johnnie told me about a time while he was in 
school. They had a bell with a long rope and a big loop right in 
the end of the rope. He never got a chance to ring the bell 
because the bigger kids would push him out of the way. One 
day it was his turn to ring the bell, so he got a chair and climbed 
up to get hold of the rope. Then he stuck his foot through the 
loop so the big kids couldn't push him down. The teacher 
waited for the bell to ring but it never did. When she came to 
see why, she found Johnnie hanging upside down with his foot 
caught in the loop." 



Cache Ward Records. 
(LDS Church, Undated) 



On November 1, 1913, Johnnie was baptized a member of The 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Bishop R.G. 
Meikle. 



1915 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 

Ruby Nada Madsen 
born April 4, 1915. 

German U-Boat Sank the U.S. Ship 
Lusitania in 1915. 



(Vernice) "When Johnnie was a little kid and they lived up 
Horseshoe Canyon, he broke a Holstein calf to ride. One day he 
was riding along and here came some guy on a horse. The 
fellow said, 'You need to have a horse to ride. You talk to your 
dad and come on down to my place and I '11 trade you. ' Johnnie 
talked it over with his dad and rode his calf down and made the 
trade — the calf for a pony. He rode home on a nice little pony." 



Stella M. Douglass in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Stella) "Johnnie was crippled when he was three and it was 
difficult for him to walk, so Mother was concerned whenever he 
left home. He rode his horse down to get the mail and stopped 
to play with some kids. He didn't notice the storm that was 
brewing and it caught him on his way home. 



81 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Johnnie Madsen at about age seven. 



1916 



Johnnie William Madsen. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 

Various Interviews. 
( Whyte, Lavina M., Undated) 

Velna Syble Madsen born 
April 5, 1917. 

U.S. passed 18th Amendment — 
Prohibition. 



"The storm was so bad that we huddled in the middle of the 
house. The hailstones made big lumps on Johnnie's head and 
hands. It also made the horses ears floppy where the hailstones 
hit them. Another time, a storm came up and the lightning hit 
beside the house. When the next clap of thunder came, it was so 
intense, it threw the door open." 

(Judy) "On a late summer day, Grandma Madsen drove the 
wagon and horse team to town. Uncle Johnnie, my mom, 
(Ruby), and Aunt Luella rode in the wagon. The sun got in 
Johnnie's eyes and as he tried to block the sun with his hands he 
said, 'That darned sun is in my eyes.' Grandma Madsen, 
without turning around said, 'Don't cuss the sun, Johnnie.' 
Years later as my mom, her sisters, and Uncle Johnnie 
remembered this occasion, they commented on the harshness of 
the winters in the Basin and how Grandma Madsen longed for 
sunshine during the winter months." 

(Lavina) "In 1916 or 1917, the folks sent Johnnie to live with 
Dr. Kittering in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The doctor offered to help 
Johnnie and was giving him treatments for his paralysis. By that 
time, he got around well on his crutches. He was 12 years old 
by then, and sold newspapers to help with spending money. He 
did very well as he was so pleasant and cheerful and everyone 
loved him." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 

Armistice Signed November 11, 1918, 
Ending World War I. 



(Vernice) "Johnnie did everything he could to help support 
himself while he lived with Dr. Kittering. He needed a new suit 
of clothes and his parents were supposed to send him money. 
They couldn't so he had to make do with what he had. 

"The circus came to town and he saw all the wagons and horses. 
He told the doctor he wanted to ride in the parade, so he went 
down and talked to the circus people and sure enough, when 
they came through town, there was Johnnie riding with them." 



S2 



Johnnie William Madsen 



Johnnie William Madsen. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



* 








Johnnie Madsen (above right) 

with one of his sheep. 

Circa 1918. 

A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Judy) "Grandma Madsen was a deeply spiritual person who 
was prone to visionary dreams and premonitions. She passed 
some of these gifts on to her children. As a young man milking 
cows one evening while they lived in the Canyon, Uncle 
Johnnie saw neighbors walk by and continue down the road 
toward their home. He kept looking at them as they walked and 
felt something was peculiar. The road appeared to blend into 
the horizon and the family appeared to walk into the sky. The 
next day, news was received by the Madsen family that their 
neighbors' house had caught fire and burned during the night 
taking the lives of all the family members." 

(Amy) "My brother, Johnnie, was eight years old when I was 
born and it always seemed like I was his pal. He would always 
say, 'Amy run get (this or that thing he needed).' I was with him 
a lot. I especially remember cutting the tails off his little lambs. 
He built a big bonfire and placed a gunny sack on the snow. 
Then he stuck an iron in the fire to heat. He would cut the tails 
off the little lambs and I would bring him the hot iron to 
cauterize the wound and stop the bleeding. Oh, I can still hear 
the searing sound of that hot iron and how the little lambs cried 
from the pain. It hurt them, but Johnnie explained it had to be 
done." 



Memories. 
(Shaw, Merry F., Undated) 



(Merry) "Uncle Johnnie told me about a time he made apple 
jack. He had a good batch going in the cellar when the Bishop 
came by to visit. He asked Grandma Madsen where Johnnie 
was and she directed him to the cellar. The Bishop asked 
Johnnie what he was up to and Johnnie said he was just bottling 
up some apple juice. The Bishop wanted a taste and nothing 
Johnnie said could change his mind. By the time the Bishop got 
through tasting, he was drunker than a skunk. Johnnie finally 
got him up out of the cellar and was trying to get him on his 
horse when Grandma Madsen poked her head out to see what 
was going on. She was one angry lady. She sent the Bishop on 
home and made Johnnie dump every last bottle of his apple jack. 



83 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Arnold Hensie, Johnnie Madsen, and 
Mae Eardley. Circa early 1920s. 



"At that time, there was a bounty on wolves and one of 
Johnnie's friends invited him for a ride up Horseshoe Canyon 
where it meets with Packsaddle. This fellow told Johnnie he 
knew where there was a den and they could collect an easy 
bounty on the pups. Johnnie climbed up on the horse behind 
this friend and they rode up into the mountains. Sure enough, 
they found the den and this young guy handed Johnnie a gun 
and instructed him to keep watch for the mother wolf while he 
crawled in to get the pups. Those pups set up an awful racket 
when he got in there and it wasn't long before the mother wolf 
made an appearance. Johnnie took a shot at her but he missed. 

"He yelled at his friend to get out of there because the mother 
was back. His friend said, 'Hey Jack, you got a sack or 
something!'' Of course he didn't, so the fellow pulled off his 
overalls and tied a knot in the end of each leg. Then he stuffed 
those pups down the legs of his overalls. Well, overalls were all 
the fellow was wearing. They climbed back on the horse and 
threw the overalls with the pups yelping inside over the back of 
the horse and off they went. Johnnie kept looking over his 
shoulder and every once in a while he caught a glimpse of the 
mother wolf trailing them. 



"There was a crew up the canyon at the Brown Bear Coal Mine 
and, when they got to the camp, the friend jumped off, stark 
naked, and asked if the men had a gunny sack or something they 
could borrow. They transferred the pups to the sack and 
Johnnie's friend put his overalls back on. They rode down to 
the sheep ranch near Tetonia owned by his friend's father. They 
locked the pups in the granary and went to town to collect the 
bounty. Since they didn't have the skins to turn in, the man at 
the courthouse was very reluctant to give them the money, but 
he said to Johnnie, "Madsen, if you say you have so many wolf 
pups, I believe you, and I trust you to get them killed." Johnnie 
said he would, and they took their money and rode back out to 
the sheep ranch. 



K4 



Johnnie William Madsen 



"When they opened the granary, there wasn't a pup in sight. 
The little brothers and sisters heard the pups yelping. When 
they opened the door to play, those pups ran like crazy. They 
never found a sign of those pups or the mother wolf." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "At one time, the family lived amongst a bunch of 
people who thought they were really righteous. They kept after 
Johnny to get him to come to Priesthood meeting and he finally 
agreed and attended. Later he said, 7 thought I was in a 
moonshiner's convention." He also said he couldn't go to 
church because he couldn't afford it. They were either 
sustaining him as a member or in some position in the ward and 
he said, ''When I turned around to see if anyone was voting for 
me, I ripped the sleeve right out of my suit coat." 



"I never could figure out how they 

thought they had such a good thing 

there and it (whiskey) tasted so nasty." 

Vernice Douglass. 



"During prohibition, Uncle Johnnie used mash to make whiskey. 
He also made beer and had one batch in the old cellar. He was 
down there bottling up his beer when this neighbor down the 
road (he was kind of a nosy guy) came riding up. He says, 
'What you doin ' down there, Madsen?' He came on down into 
the cellar and ran a tomato can through this barrel and began 
drinking. It took Johnnie a bit to get him out of his supply. He 
finally got his beer all bottled up and left it to age. Then he had 
Maxine pack it out and put it in his wagon. She got it all loaded 
and then some of those bottles began to blow up." 



Various Conversations. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002) 



(Maxine) "I remember Johnnie making booze in our dirt cellar. 
He used our root beer bottles and bottle-caper to make his beer. 
One evening he came by and borrowed our two-wheeled cart 
and asked Vernice and me to haul some of his loot back to the 
cart. We decided it would be fun to play a joke on Johnnie so 
we hauled the bottles into the house. When he came out of the 
cellar and saw the cart empty, he got after us and we had to put 
it back into the cart." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "Uncle Johnnie used to tell about an incident that 
happened while he was helping harvest grain. He worked for 
Fullmers and they used one of those big old harvesters with all 



85 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Johnnie Madsen and Maxine 

Douglass. 

Circa 1925. 



the belts. Johnnie drove the team of horses and hauled the 
water, so he always had to go somewhere to get water. So he 
looked at the river one day and thought, 'I'll just back into the 
river and let the water run in the top of the tank. ' Well, he did 
and, when it started filling up, the weight of the water began 
pulling the tank back toward the water. He damned near 
drowned before he got that team and trailer up out of the river. 

"It seemed like everything that went wrong happened to Uncle 
Johnnie. He worked and stayed at our place a lot and we used 
to throw the hay off the stack at night so we could feed the cows 
in the morning. It was winter and we'd turned the pigs loose in 
the hay yard. Johnnie and I just got the hay down and here 
come this old sow. She ran right between Johnnie's legs and he 
was holding on for dear life and riding her backwards. I wasn't 
very old at the time, and I yelled at Johnnie, 'Don 't ride the 
pigs- 



"The Madsen Family." 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Maxine) "Johnnie learned to play the harmonica and attended 
many dances where he entertained folks by playing, singing, and 
yodeling." 



1929 



Various Conversations. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002) 



(Maxine) "Johnnie was always making booze of some kind 
somewhere. In about 1929, we lived a block from the church in 
Cache. There was a dance at the church and Johnnie had booze 
stashed in the mailbox at my parents house. The fellows at the 
dance would be dancing by and ask Johnnie if he had any mail 
for them. Johnnie would say, 'Well, let me go check.' The 
fellow slipped him the price of a bottle and Johnnie left the 
dance with Roy Hansen. Roy drove Johnnie to the mailbox 
where he rolled out of the car and collected several bottles. 
When he got back to the dance, he gave the fellow the sign that, 
yes, he had mail, and slipped back outside to deliver the goods. 



"When we moved back to the Basin, Uncle Johnnie came to stay 
with us. We had three beds set up: one for Mom and Dad (Stella 
and Orrin), one for Uncle Johnnie, and one for us kids. Uncle 



86 



Johnnie William Madsen 



Johnnie was quite young and liked to party. One night he came 
home quite late and very plastered. He was carrying a lantern 
and came into the bedroom swinging the lantern around his 
head. He gave it one good swing and the light went out. He 
said, 'Now I'm in the dark,' and fell into bed." 



Sortor, Ruby M., in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Ruby) "I remember one Christmas, Johnnie and the older 
married sisters bought a big wooden bucket full of candy. Oh, 
boy! We thought that was great. We didn't get much for 
Christmas, but what we got we really appreciated. 



"I also remember Johnnie taking care of his rabbits and his 
horse. He was a lot of fun and I always loved Johnnie." 



Orrin Douglass in "The Madsen Family." 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 

Black Tuesday, beginning of the Great 
Depression, October 29, 1929. 

Anna Mary Bersnip Hansen 
died January 9, 1933. 

Andrew Boise Hansen 
died June 2, 1938. 



(Orrin) "During the winter of 1929, just a few days before 
Christmas, Johnnie, who was staying with us, decided to catch 
a train and go to St. Anthony to spend the holidays with his 
mother and dad and Velna and Ruby. We lived about a fourth 
of a mile from the railroad tracks. How come he was late 
getting ready to catch the train, I'll never know, but Stell was 
helping get his clothes on. He had the community tie (mine) 
hung around his neck and his shoes weren't tied. I had the team, 
Babe and Nance, hooked to the hay rack on the sleigh. I turned 
the team around the well in the yard and Johnnie jumped on the 
back as I drove by. The train was coming through the cut, 
which was less than a mile away. I had the team running their 
best going out of our yard and, as the team ran over the track, 
Johnnie rolled off and flagged the train. He finished dressing on 
the train. I had the team going at such a clip I couldn't get them 
stopped until I got almost to Elmo Gee's place, a quarter of a 
mile away." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "Uncle Johnnie bought a Model T' Ford. It had no 
speedometer and no top on it and everyone wanted to see how 
fast it would go. Uncle Howard (Sortor) had an old Chevrolet 
with a speedometer so Johnnie says, 'Now, Hy, when I get it 
going down the road as fast as it will go, you follow and I '11 give 
you the wave and you read your speedometer.'' Johnnie told me 



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OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Johnnie and Dime, one 

of his favorite horses, bringing the 

cattle from the Modoc. 

October 1959. 



(Vernice) I'd better ride with him. Now I mean we was flying. 
I was just a little kid and I was holding on with both hands and 
my white hair was just a flyin'. We raced down the road and, 
when Johnnie waved to Uncle Howard, we stopped. It took us 
miles to get stopped. Johnnie says, 'What'd she say Howard? ' 
'Thirty-five! ' he says. That was as fast as I'd every gone. You 
go four miles an hour on a horse and 35 seems pretty fast. 

"Johnnie loved horses. If he had horses he couldn't handle, he 
had to get rid of them. He always parked his sleigh or wagon in 
front of the barn and then turned his horses out in the pasture. 
When he called them, they would come and each stand on the 
correct side of the tongue and wait for Johnnie to harness them 
up. He loved all animals and usually owned a dog. The one I 
remember best was named Old Blue. He was a dingo Johnnie 
sent for." 



Uncle Johnnie. 
(Sorter, LaVerl, 2003) 



(LaVerl) "One day when I was about 10 years old, I didn't get 
my chores finished before it was time for my dad to get home. 
Uncle Johnnie warned me that as soon as Daddy got home, my 
behind would be whacked hard. I was scared but knew there 
was no time to finish and I knew what awaited me. Uncle 
Johnnie went to his truck and called me over. He pulled a 
couple of magazines out and put them in my overalls, nicely 
padding my behind. Just then, Daddy drove up in his pickup. 
Daddy got out, called me over to him, and proceeded to use his 
belt across my behind. After about three whacks, I yelped 
appropriately and ran to the house. Just before Daddy and 
Uncle Johnnie were out of sight, I looked back and caught them 
winking at each other." 



Velna Syble Madsen Chinn 
died August 13, 1939. 



1941 



Johnnie was very close to his mother and sisters. Mary Madsen 
moved to Idaho Falls, Idaho, but they still managed to visit back 
and forth often. Johnnie usually brought his mother something 
when he came. 



XX 



Johnnie William Madsen 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 




Johnnie (far right) with his two best 

friends, Mel Nelson and Mel Larsen 

(unsure which is which). 



For example, on Saturday, March 1, 1941, she wrote: (Mary) 
"Stell, Orrin, Johnnie, llene, Geneal, and Mel Nelson came and 
it sure did rain. Johnnie brought me one ham shoulder and a 
piece of side bacon. I went with them to town. We went over to 
Nell 's but she was not there. She had gone up to my place so we 
went over to Amy 's. They did not stay long for the road was so 
slippery. " Amy lived just across the road from Mary Madsen. 

(Mary) March 29, 1941, Saturday: " Johnnie and Mel Larson 
came tonight. We ate supper, then all of them went to the show 
house. I stayed home with Beverly. Mel and Johnnie slept here 
tonight. " 

March 30, Sunday: '''George came after me to go to 
St. Anthony but I had company so I did not go. Then Johnnie, 
Ruby, Mel, and myself went up to see Vina. Ruby went home 
with Mel Nelson. Johnnie went and got LaRay and brought her 
here so Mel could see her. Not so hot. Johnnie and Mel stayed 
here last night. " 

March 31, Monday: "Johnnie and Mel took me down to Nell 's 
to wash. Johnnie and Mel ate dinner with Nell, then went home. 
Johnnie took my dog home. Nell came and stayed a little while 
here tonight. " 



April 29, Tuesday: "/ went to meeting this afternoon (Relief 
Society). When I came home, Emmett asked me if I want to go 
up to Ruby 's. I did. We left here at 4:35 and got there at 6:55. 
Johnnie came over and stayed till 2:00 a.m., then we all went to 
bed. Ruby and I talked almost till morning.'" 

April 30, Wednesday: "We got up at 6:00. Gave the kids their 
breakfast and sent them out to play. Then we went over to 
Stell 's just a little while. She was washing. Then we went over 
to see Johnnie. He gave me a shoulder and a ham. 



89 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"Then we went back to Ruby 's and went over to Anna 's. We 
stayed about an hour. Ruby stayed until Howard came after 
her. We got home at 6:20. Everything was all okay. " 

May 29, Thursday: "Got up and got breakfast. Then Ruby and 
Howard came and I went home with them. Amy and Emmett 
came in their car. We went down to Johnnie 'sfor supper. Ruby 
and Howard were there too. We went home at 11:00. 

June 29, Sunday: "7 went to Sunday School then to Nell 'sfor 
chicken dinner. Ruby, Johnnie, and Howard came and brought 
me some ties. I am mad they did not come and get me. " 

July 19, Saturday: "1 went over to Amy 's to eat dinner. We 
just started to eat when Johnnie and Ruby drove down so they 
ate too. Then we came over here and got supper. Johnnie went 
to the 91 Club. Ruby, Amy, Johnnie and 1 went to town. 
Johnnie gave me $2.00. We went to bed at 11:15. " 

July 20, Sunday: "Johnnie came in at 6:30 this morning. We 
ate dinner and washed dishes. Then we went down to Nell 's and 
had some more dinner, then came home. Ruby and Johnnie 
went home at 5:30. " 



Birdy was a sister to 

William Howard Chinn, who 

was married to Velna Madsen. 



August 23, Saturday: "Johnnie came tonight. He is taking 
Birdy out. " 

August 24, Sunday: "Johnnie came in at 6:30. Johnnie went 
home at 11:00 this morning. " 

August 26, Tuesday: "Johnnie came at 3:30. He brought 
Birdy home. Johnnie took us down to Nell 's, then to town. We 
came home. " 

September 7, Sunday: "Johnnie and Mel Larson came over a 
while. They came down last night and took Birdy to Shelley. 
Some girl to take out. Ha ha. We went down to Nell 's to get 
some of George 's overalls so Johnnie could split me some wood. 



90 



Johnnie William Madsen 



/ got dinner for them. Then Nell came over. They were ready 
to go home. " 

September 20, Saturday: "Johnnie and Mel came tonight at 
1:00. They went to bed. " 

September 21, Sunday: "Johnnie and Mel got up at 8:00. 
They ate breakfast, then Mel chopped some wood . They went 
home at 11:00 this morning. " 

October 5, Sunday: "It snowed a lot last night. We did not do 
anything all day. Johnnie came over for dinner. Ruby cooked 
chicken. " 

October 6, Monday: "Johnnie, Ruby, and myself went to 
Idaho Falls to get my chickens. We ate dinner in Rigby on 
Johnnie. Sure was good. " 

October 7, Tuesday: "We went to a surprise party. Johnnie 
and Ruby sang some songs. Came home at 1:00. 

October 15, Wednesday: "Johnnie came and asked me to go 
to Shelley. I stayed with Amy. Johnnie went to Shelley to take 
Birdy out. " 

October 16, Thursday: "Johnnie did not come home last 
night. He stayed in Shelley. Johnnie came after me at 5:00 this 
afternoon. I ate supper at Amy's. Johnnie ate at Chinn's. 
Johnnie came for me at 6:30 and we went to Nell 's. At 8:00 we 
left for home (the Basin). " 

October 21, Tuesday: "/ walked home from Stell's this 
afternoon. Johnnie was here when I got here (Ruby's). " 



91 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



November 1, Saturday: "Johnnie took me and Ruby to Idaho 
Falls. We ate dinner with Amy, then we went down town. 
Johnnie went to see Birdy. " 

November 2, Sunday: "Johnnie came in at 4:30. His car 
stopped on him. He had to get some man to take him home. 
Elvin went to get Howard Chinn to take Johnnie to his car. 
Emmett went too. Johnnie brought Emmett home at 11:00 and 
he went again. Never came back until 6:00 this evening. " 

November 15, Saturday: "Johnnie came to Ruby 's ready to go 
to Idaho Falls so I went with him. We got to Amy 's at 7:30. I 
stayed with Amy. Johnnie went to see Birdy. 

November 16, Sunday: "Johnnie stayed with Nell last night. 
George and Johnnie came after me at 12:00. 1 ate dinner with 
Nell. Johnnie did not come (home last night) till 12:00. We 
were in bed. It rained this evening. " 

November 17, Monday: "Johnnie went to see Birdy today 
again. It snowed all day. The weather is very bad tonight so we 
are going to stay till morning. " 

November 18, Tuesday: "We just sat around talking this 
morning. It snowed one foot this morning. We started for the 
Basin at 1:30. Got there at 3:20. " 

November 20, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day: "It was cold 
this morning. We didn 't eat till 5:00. We was waiting for Nell 
and George but they didn 't come. Johnnie came. We had a 
good dinner. Chicken, potatoes, gravy, dressing, sweet 
potatoes, cranberries, apple and banana salad, hot rolls, and 
mince meat and apple pies. Johnnie and Howard went to town 
tonight and bought us each a bottle of root beer. " 



92 



Johnnie William Madsen 



November 21, Friday: "Johnnie and Mel Nelson came over 
this evening. Mel said someone had been in his house and ate 
one pie, a cake, and a doughnut. We found out that Ray 
Hilly ard and Delmer and Dale (Ruby's step-sons) had done it. " 



Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor 
December 7, 1941. 



December 25, Thursday, Christmas Day: "/ went to Amy's 
for dinner. We ate at 2:00. Then at 2:30, Johnnie, Mel Larson, 
Ruby, Howard, and all the kids came so they ate. Amy had a 
nice dinner. Johnnie and Mel went to all the club houses. " 



December 26, Friday: '7 made some soup. Ruby, Howard, 
Johnnie, and Mel went home at 2:00 o 'clock.'''' 



1943 



Anna Mary Hansen Madsen, Nellie 

Madsen Standen, Thelma Heath 

Standen, and Sandra Heath Standen 

died July 19, 1943. 



On July 18, 1943, the Madsen family held their annual family 
reunion at the St. Anthony City Park. They had a wonderful 
family picnic. George and Nell Standon had their little fishing 
boat hitched to their car and planned to drive to Island Park 
Reservoir to fish the next day. They stayed the night with 
Lavina. In the morning, they gathered their things. Mary 
Madsen said she wanted to go. It was Mary's first time on a 
boat and would prove to be her last. The boat developed a slow 
leak and sank. Mary suffered a heart attack and died. Nell, her 
daughter-in-law, Thelma, and granddaughter, Sandra, also 
drowned. George and Bill were the only survivors. 



BESSIE CHASE CAMPBELL 



International Genealogy Index. 
(LDS Church, Undated) 



Bessie Chase was the daughter of Guss and Emma Taylor 
Chase. She was born May 27, 1917, at Rigby, Jefferson, Idaho. 
At the age of 15, she married Thomas Hilton (Hilt) Campbell, 
who was then 24 years of age. He was born July 26, 1908, at 
Victor, Teton, Idaho. The couple settled in Teton Basin, living 
in a small home just under the hill from the Cache-Clawson 
Cemetery. They had four children: Phil, Noma, Connie, and 
Lavon. Hilt and Johnnie were good friends and worked 
together. 



93 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Conversation. 
(Campbell, Phil, 2003) 




Johnnie haying with his English 

Shire team, 

Dan and Deede. 

Summer 1959. 



(Phil) "Johnnie, my dad (Hilt Campbell), and the Larsens were 
hauling hay west of Tetonia for Frank Larsen. Frank was a 
brother to Scotty and Mel Larsen. Frank was stacking and I was 
running the derrick team on the beaver slide. My dad and 
Johnnie were bringing in the hay with the buck rakes. When 
quitting time came at 6:00 p.m., I unhitched my team to hook up 
to the wagon so everyone could ride to the house. Dad was also 
unhitching his team but he did it backwards to his usual 
procedure. He had an older horse harnessed with an 
inexperienced colt and he usually unharnessed the colt first. But 
he was in a hurry and unhooked the older horse first, then the 
colt, and jumped up on the colt. It scared the colt, which reared 
up, and the hames hit Dad in the stomach, knocking the wind 
out of him. He fell forward over the horse's head. I was 
probably 200 feet away but, by the time I ran around my team 
and got over there, the colt had come down on him two or three 
times and my dad was already dead. I was just nine years old at 
the time. It was August 11, 1944." 



JOHNNIE WILLIAM MADSEN AND BESSIE 
CAMPBELL 



Germans surrender May 7, 1945. 

Japan surrendered September 2, 1945. 

Marriage License. 
(Campbell, Phil, 2003) 



On November 30, 1945, Johnnie married Bessie Chase 
Campbell in Dillon, Montana. They lived in Bessie's home at 
Cache. Each spring, Johnnie bought two or three weaner pigs 
to raise and they had some milk cows. Johnnie and Bessie were 
divorced in 1952. Johnnie loved Bessie's children and kept in 
close contact with them through the years. He provided a great 
deal of support and assistance to them as they grew up. 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "While he was married to Bessie, Johnnie acquired a 
few head of cattle and every year he would borrow a bit of 
money and buy about 30 head of young stock to feed for the 
summer and add to his herd. He never had very many cattle, but 
enough to get by." 



94 



Johnnie William Madsen 



1946 



Memories. 
(Shaw, Merry F., Undated) 



(Merry) "My first memory of Uncle Johnnie was when I was 
four or five. Grandma Lavina took me on the train to the Basin 
to stay with Aunt Stella. One morning Geneal and I went out to 
gather pullet eggs for my breakfast and, when we walked back 
into the kitchen, Grandma said, 'Come see who is here to meet 
you!' I was excited about meeting someone new and walked 
into the living room. Uncle Johnnie was sitting diagonally 
across the living room and, as I walked through the door, he 
brushed his black hair forward over his face, got down on his 
hands and knees, and crawled towards me, growing like a bear. 
I screamed and ran for the safety of my grandmother's arms. It 
took some time before I was willing to venture into the living 
room again, but Uncle Johnnie and I became good friends. He 
was always one of my favorite uncles." 



Johnnie William Madsen. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "In my earliest memories of Uncle Johnnie he was 
always with Uncle Mel Larsen (we always called him 'Uncle' 
even though he really wasn't). Uncle Johnnie was very 
demonstrative, both physically and vocally. Uncle Mel was shy 
and soft spoken and I preferred the latter trait. My family often 
remind me that, as a toddler, I refused to show Uncle Johnnie 
my toys. Instead, I would take them to Uncle Mel. 'Lookie, 
Uncle Mel, ' I said while hiding the toy from Uncle Johnnie. 
They both laughed as I climbed up on Uncle Mel's lap and 
ignored Uncle Johnnie. However, even a youngster could 
recognize Uncle Johnnie's generous nature and his ability to 
love. Maybe that was the reason I began to blame things on 
him, like crayon marks on the refrigerator. He would fess right 
up to whatever terrible deed had been committed. By age four 
I was no longer frightened of Uncle Johnnie's voice and size 
and truly fell in love with him." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "One day, Johnnie and I went over to Cliff Bevan's. 
A sudden thunder and lightening storm came up, which is 
common in the valley, and we walked out to check on this calf 
Cliff had staked out in the field. That calf was running as fast 
as he could go in a tight circle at the end of his rope. Johnnie 
misjudged the length of the rope and, when that calf came 



95 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



around full circle, he ran right between Johnnie's legs and 
caught him up. Off went Johnnie and that calf around that 
circle. It took a bit to stop the calf and rescue Johnnie. He 
wasn't hurt and laughed along with us about his adventure." 



Our Madsen Family. 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992.) 



(Maxine) "Between the time that he was 25 and 45 years old, 
Johnnie herded sheep and cows for various people living in the 
Teton Valley. He lived in a sheep camp all summer in the 
Horseshoe Canyon area and watched over the animals." 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003) 



Johnnie William Madsen. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 




Johnnie Madsen always had 
the same grand smile. 



(Connie) "Uncle Johnnie told me he went to church a few times 
but said he had to quit because it was too hard on his clothes and 
he couldn't afford it. He was there when Vernice Douglass was 
sustained as Bishop of Cache Ward, and I think Uncle Johnnie 
said he was being sustained to a position. He said he turned 
around to see if anyone was voting for him and ripped the sleeve 
right out of his jacket. Uncle Johnnie had a unique way of 
telling a story and I wish he were here to tell you this one. 
Johnnie was a very good person and really treasured little 
children." 

(Judy) "Uncle Johnnie dressed more impeccably than a 
department store manager, so as a ranch hand and postman, he 
was 'styling.' He always wore a long-sleeved plaid shirt, 
usually flannel, with bib overalls, and a black, felt cowboy hat. 
Uncle Johnnie NEVER washed his overalls. He said that once 
good overalls were laundered, they lost their stiffness. He 
carried a harmonica in his overalls and played and sang no 
matter where he was or what the time of day. His repertoire 
included folk songs, church hymns, country wester, and modern 
music. He also modified and improvised when a creative streak 
hit him. Some of his favorites included 'Have I Told You Lately 
That I Love You, ' The Yellow Rose of Texas, ' 'The Tennessee 
Waltz, ' and 'The Red River Valley. ' He enjoyed listening to 
Rosemary Clooney, Teresa Brewer, and Dinah Shore. 



96 



Johnnie William Madsen 



"Uncle Johnnie was nearly six feet tall and always stood tall and 
carried himself with pride in spite of his crippled legs and 
distinctive walk. His legs were weak from his childhood 
disease, so he used his hands to position his legs when sitting 
down, getting in or out of a car, or riding horse back. Even 
though this slowed him down, he never complained, never 
expected special treatment, and never let it hold him back." 



Taped Conversation. 
(Martin. Connie H., 2003) 



(Connie) "Uncle Johnnie had massive shoulders. He developed 
a lot of strength in his chest and upper arms because he 
compensated for the lack of strength in his legs." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Dorothy C, 2003) 



(Dorothy) "The first and only new car Johnnie ever bought was 
a brown Studebaker. He named it 'Old Red.' It was winter time 
and Vernice and I took Johnnie down to Idaho Falls to get it. 
The roads were slick and he was afraid to drive it, so I drove the 
new car and he rode home with Vernice. The next morning he 
was supposed to come take our children to school because he 
wanted them to ride in the new car. But it was 50 degrees below 
zero and his new car wouldn't start and ours did. Boy, was he 
mad." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, James V., 2003) 



(Jim) "I was only about 10 or 12 years old when I went with 
Uncle Johnnie to deliver the mail. I wasn't old enough to drive 
but I did anyway. I drove his car while he put the mail in the 
boxes. I also remember staying with him, and when we were 
finished eating, he wanted me to do the dishes now. Not in 20 
minutes, but now." 



Johnnie William Madsen. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "Uncle Johnnie's career allowed him a nice long winter 
vacation. Once the farming was done, it wasn't long before the 
snow began to fall and the roads were closed for mail delivery. 
This usually occurred by the end of October. That's when 
Uncle Johnnie's vacation began. He and 'Old Red Top' (a 
Studebaker he bought brand new and loved as much as he did 
his horse, June) would head out of the Basin. He told Aunt 
Stella goodby, and drove to St. Anthony to visit Aunt Anna for 
awhile. 



97 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"Then to Aunt Lavina's in Blackfoot for a time, then over to 
Aunt Amy's, and finally to Pocatello to stay with Mom (Ruby). 
Since Aunt Luella also lived in Pocatello, he could visit both 
sisters at the same time. These visits often lasted up to two 
months or longer. The entertainment never ended: stories, 
music, singing, laughing, and a sense of family so strong it 
could hardly be contained within the walls of the house." 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003) 



(Connie) "Uncle Johnnie loved the 'Lawrence Welk Show' and 
when he came to our house for his winter visit, he watched the 
clock so he wouldn't miss the show. He folded his arms across 
his chest and told all the kids it was quiet time. He especially 
liked the Lennon sisters when they were young." 



Johnnie William Madsen. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "Uncle Johnnie's favorite performer on the Lawrence 
Welk Show was Alice Lennon. Uncle Johnnie would settle into 
the chair and, at the beginning of every show, he'd say, 'That 
Alice is sure a pretty little thing. ' He also loved to watch 
wrestling matches on television. He got so excited and involved 
that the rest of the family were entertained just by watching him. 
If the match got controversial, Uncle Johnnie would slap his 
legs and shout, l By grab, the referee didn 't call that right,' or 
'By grab, that pot-licker pulled his hair.'' His favorite 
expression was l By grab.'" 



Telephone Conversation. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004) 



(Marlene) "One of Uncle Johnnie's favorite songs was, 7 wish 
I was single again. When I was single my pockets would jingle. 
I wish I was single again. ' 



"Uncle Johnnie dated quite often while he stayed with us during 
the winter. I remember one in particular whose name was 
Agnes. She was a very thin, small woman and, somehow, Aunt 
Luella got acquainted with her. Agnes was in love with Uncle 
Johnnie and Aunt Luella had a very tender heart when it came 
to matters of love. She came to visit one night and got really 
upset with Uncle Johnnie because he wouldn't agree to marry 
Agnes. He had no intention of marrying again. He said Agnes 
was so skinny, if she swallowed an olive she would look 



9K 



Johnnie William Madsen 



pregnant. Aunt Luella lost that argument and Uncle Johnnie 
stayed single." 



Memories. 
(Shaw, Merry F., Undated) 



(Merry) "In later years, Uncle Johnnie took groups on week- 
long horseback pack trips along the Continental Divide. He was 
the guide and they camped under the stars and cooked over a 
fire every night. He enjoyed those trips. He was always more 
at home in the out-of-doors." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "I went riding up in the mountains with Uncle Johnnie 
and he pointed down to a hole and said, 'That's where Howard 
Sortor and I had our still. We came up one morning to tend our 
still and the sheriff was sitting there. We high-tailed it out of 
there. ' 



"One summer, Aunt Amy, her husband, and I went riding with 
Johnnie up along Packsaddle. Johnnie used to herd cows and 
sheep up there. There is a trail way up on top of the mountain. 
Johnnie said, ' When I was herding sheep up here with another 
old guy, we used to camp up here. There is a waterfall right 
over there and one morning we decided to just put our dishes 
under the waterfall and let the dishes wash themselves. But the 
mutton tallow just set right up in that ice cold water." 



Our Madsen Family. 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Maxine) "Johnnie named each horse and took great care of 
each one. One team, Bud and Bell, was special to him. His 
saddle horses were called Fly (who bit anyone who came near), 
June, and Trinket. Everywhere he went, he took his Dingo dogs 
(especially Old Blue) and his horse. His last horse was Trinket, 
a beautiful grey, and he trained her to jump into the back of his 
pickup so he could haul her around where he needed to ride." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "Our son, Jim, followed in Johnnie's footsteps 
everywhere he went." 



99 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, James V., 2003) 



(Jim) "I had a little Shetland pony and went riding with Uncle 
Johnnie a lot. Once, we were going to cross the Teton River on 
horseback and Johnnie kept telling me I'd have to get off and 
lead my horse across the river because it was so deep and swift. 
He had me scared to death. When we got to the river, I got off 
and waded in, and found the river was very shallow at that point. 
Johnnie loved a good joke on someone. 



"Johnnie loved to ride up in the canyon and always said, 'I'll 
bring the lunchf And he did. His idea of lunch was a cold slab 
of meat between two slices of bread, and that's all." 



Conversation. 
(Campbell, Phil, 2003) 



(Phil) "When I was old enough to drive, I raised a calf as a 4-H 
project and sold the calf. This provided enough money for a 
down payment on a car, and Johnnie agreed to sign with me on 
a loan for the balance." 



1956 



Conversation. 
(Campbell, Betty H., 2003) 



(Betty) "In about 1956, Johnnie was admitted to the Teton 
Valley Hospital for an appendectomy. My mother was a nurse 
there and I was working as an aid. Phil was on his mission at 
the time serving in the Northern States Mission (Minnesota and 
Canada). He was about ready to come home and Johnnie was 
sure he could match Phil and me up and promised to get me his 
address. Once Johnnie was released, I never heard from him. 
However, the next spring, Phil and I were both attending Ricks 
College and I had gone home and needed a ride back to school 
to take some tests. My mother called Bessie and asked if I could 
ride down with Phil. It must have been destiny because it 
wasn't long until we were engaged. We were married on 
August 21, 1957, and Johnnie loaned us $50 for a honeymoon 
trip." 



Johnnie William Madsen. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



Johnnie had a deep love for his family and helped every one he 
could, as evidenced by the following stories. 

(Judy) "My sister, Beverly, loved Uncle Johnnie with her entire 
heart. He provided tremendous emotional support when she was 
struggling with the responsibilities of a young single mother. 



100 



Johnnie William Madsen 




■ 



Our beloved Uncle Johnnie. 



During his winter visit of 1956, he weaned Beverly's daughter, 
Darla Rae, from the bottle by singing and rocking her to sleep 
each night. The entire family benefitted from his singing. Then 
he proceeded to potty-train this little girl as well. Uncle Johnnie 
was a good friend and listener for Beverly. One night he and 
Beverly went to a drive-in movie with her driving his 
Studebaker (his first experience with a drive-in!). When the 
sound came through the speaker, he nearly jumped through the 
roof of 'Old Red Top!' Uncle Johnnie didn't realize sound 
would accompany the movie. Another night they went for sodas 
and talked for seven hours straight. Uncle Johnnie gave Beverly 
the encouragement and strength she needed during a difficult 
time in her life and she will be eternally grateful for the 
unconditional love he provided to her. 



"Wanda has similar memories of Uncle Johnnie's love and help. 
During one of his winter visits, Wanda was pining away for her 
new husband who was on military duty in Hawaii. Uncle 
Johnnie made up a game wherein he and Wanda counted the 
flowers in the wallpaper on the living room walls. They played 
this game every day. The purpose and enjoyment of this game 
escaped me at the time, however, I later realized he was taking 
a young bride's mind off her loneliness. (Even so, I have NO 
wallpaper in my home.)" 



Conversation. 
(Henson, Beverly S., 2005) 



(Beverly) "One day Uncle Johnnie asked me to go to town and 
buy him a record of his favorite country-western singer, Wanda 
Jackson. He loved that woman's music. He sang her songs all 
the time. I couldn't find that record anywhere. He also loved 
Alice Lawn on the Lawrence Welk Show. And he could whistle 
like no one I've ever heard." 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, LavinaM, 1958-1962) 



(Lavina) March 27, 1958, Tuesday: "Johnnie, Luella, and 
Ruby came and had dinner and spent the day. We went to Addie 
Tressel 's show. Was real good. " 



101 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Taped Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003) 



(Connie) "Uncle Johnnie had a massive heart attack in early July 
1958. When the pains in his chest began, he started beating his 
fists against his chest and, according to the doctor, that is what 
forced the blood clot to move on through and saved his life. 
Uncle Johnnie was a big man and had a massive chest. He had 
been eating ice cream at the time and, after that, he rarely ate ice 
cream. I was visiting with my sister, Bonnie, at that time and 
when we heard the news, the prognosis was not good. However, 
after several months, Uncle Johnnie rallied and was fairly active 
again. After that Uncle Johnnie had an aversion to ice cream. 
One time after that he tried ice cream again, but felt the pain 
again and gave up ice cream." 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1958-1962) 



(Lavina) July 5, 1958, Saturday: "We went up to see Johnnie 
in the hospital at Driggs. " 

November 18, 1958, Tuesday: "Johnnie and Ruby came this 
afternoon. Stayed for supper. Johnnie bought the harness. " 



1961 



November 26, 1961, Sunday: "Johnnie and Mel came and 
visited for a while." 



Conversation. 
(Henson, Beverly S., 2005) 



(Beverly) "After Uncle Johnnie had that first heart attack, Mama 
and Daddy (Ruby and Howard) and I went up to visit him at the 
hospital. He was laying in that bed and you remember how he 
always tried to act happy and cheerful. He finally told me he 
had the worst back ache. I told him to turn over and I got the 
lotion and gave him a really good back massage. I loved that 
man and I'd have done anything for him." 



Memories. 
(Shaw, Merry F., Undated) 



(Merry) "I remember Uncle Johnnie at the family reunion each 
summer. He always joked and laughed with everyone. He had 
a unique laugh. Rather than exhaling as he laughed, he inhaled. 
He was such fun to be around. George Standen always brought 
his little gas grill and coffee pot and he and Johnnie would share 
a cup and a few jokes. 



'Johnnie was dating a woman from Rexburg, Idaho, and came 



102 



Johnnie William Madsen 



down on weekends to stay at Mother (Joy) and Lynn's house. 
They lived in a housing development on the bench just outside 
town; the houses all had the same floor plan and looked pretty 
much the same from the outside. Mother showed Johnnie which 
room he was to sleep in before he went out. He stayed fairly 
late, and when he came back, it was pretty dark outside. He 
opened the door and proceeded down the hall to find his room. 
Suddenly a woman he didn't know came out of the master 
bedroom and asked him where he thought he was going and 
what he was doing in their house. He was so upset, he could 
hardly think what to say. In the dark, he had driven up to the 
wrong house and gone into the next-door neighbor's home. 
Once she turned the light on, she recognized him and directed 
him to Mother's. He was pretty sheepish the next morning, but 
laughed and told everyone the joke on himself. Mother said it 
was a good thing the neighbors recognized him because Gordon 
Thatcher was an attorney and probably would have had Uncle 
Johnnie arrested. 

"Uncle Johnnie dated Ada Ard for a while and spent one 
afternoon at my house while he waited for her to get off work. 
He called her on the phone and asked what time she could go 
out. When she told him, he said, 'You know, I have a bone to 
pick with old Abe Lincoln. He freed all the slaves but me and 
you:" 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "Johnnie hauled mail from Tetonia around the valley 
three days a week, sometimes even during the winter when the 
snow was deep and he ran the risk of getting stuck. He never 
hardly made any money to speak of. He just caught work where 
he could." 



Memories. 
(Caron, Margery P., 2002) 



(Marge) "I remember Uncle Johnnie well. He was always in 
pain, yet never complained. He always had a big smile for 
everyone and was someone special to me." 



103 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Conversation. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002) 



(Maxine) "My mother, Stella, and Uncle Johnnie were very 
close. She did his laundry every week for years and even 
planted a few trees around his little trailer." 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Dorothy C, 2003) 



(Dorothy) "Johnnie was very particular about his laundry. I 
washed his overalls once and he was so mad at me. He didn't 
want them washed because he said it faded them out and he 
wanted them to look new all the time. One time I mended the 
elbows of his shirt using the shirt tail. He was mad about that, 
too. He told me to use the material behind the pocket. Cutting 
off the tail made it too short and he couldn't keep his shirt 
tucked in." 



Conversation. 
(Campbell, Phil, 2003) 



(Phil) "Johnnie taught me to always tuck all my clothes 
(including my jacket) into the overalls or pants. He said it 
prevented loose ends of clothing becoming caught in the farm 
machinery. To this day, I have to wear close fitting clothes and 
tuck my shirts in." 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1963-1967) 



(Lavina) April 21, 1964, Tuesday: "Is cold and cloudy. 
Johnnie came for dinner and spent the afternoon. " 

June 26, 1966, Sunday: "Amy, Harold, and I got up and ate 

breakfast. Drove down to Ashton, Lamont, and Tetonia. 
Stopped at Johnnie 's. Went over to Vernice 's and saw some 
slides. Ate dinner at Victor with Johnnie. Came home." 

February 25, 1967, Sunday: "Went up to Amy and Harold's to 
a birthday party for Johnnie. Ruby, Howard, Amy, Johnnie, 
Marlene and Bud, Jeanice and Dewane, and we were there. " 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1968-1972) 



May 7, 1972, Sunday: "Amy called. Johnnie is in the hospital 
at Driggs with pneumonia. " 



Family Group Sheet. 
(Freeman, Joy F., Undated) 



It was while he was hauling mail he met and fell in love with 
Mary Reynolds. They were married on July 1, 1972, and were 
very happy together. 



104 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



Conversation. 
(Henson, Beverly S., 2005) 



Johnnie William Madsen 



(Vernice) "He was living in a little trailer he bought from Monte 
Piquet. It was the first home he ever owned and he was sure 
proud of that homey 

(Beverly) "We went up to visit Uncle Johnnie after he bought 
that little trailer home. He had backed it up to the electrical pole 
and tied it up to the pole with a rope so it wouldn't blow over in 
the wind." 



Taped Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003a) 



(Connie) "Uncle Johnnie and my mom (Amy) went riding 
horses often. They loved to ride around and see all the beauty 
in Horseshoe Canyon. On one trip not long before he passed 
away, he stopped, got off his horse, and knelt down by a stream. 
He looked up at her and remarked how strange life is. You love 
it and then you have to grow old and leave this place." 



Conversation. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002) 



(Maxine) "Mary and Johnnie had just finished eating supper and 
Johnnie moved to the couch and sat down. Mary started doing 
the dishes and, when she looked over at Johnnie, he just 
slumped over on the couch. She called Mom (Stella) on the 
telephone. Geneal was there visiting so they both rushed over 
to Johnnie's. As soon as they walked in the door, they knew he 
was gone." 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Amy) "On Saturday, September 2, 1972, Harold and I spent the 
day with Johnnie. On Sunday when I received the call that he 
had died, I cannot describe the grief I felt. Harold was at work 
and, when I heard him drive in, I ran out to meet him, threw 
myself in his arms and sobbed. Once I could tell him what was 
wrong, Harold sobbed along with me. Johnnie was truly dear to 
us. The first things I noticed, when I saw him in his casket, 
were his strong, beautiful hands." 



Johnnie William Madsen died 
September 3, 1972. 



Johnnie William passed away at his home on September 3, 
1972, of a massive coronary. He was 67 years old. Johnnie was 
buried in the Cache-Clawson Cemetery near his parents. 



105 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Uncle Johnnie. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



I 1 

■ 




Johnnie William Madsen and Amy 

Pearl Madsen Child 

at his home in the Basin. 







i 



Johnnie William Madsen. 



(Judy) "Uncle Johnnie played a very important role in our 
family. He and mom were exceptionally close. Mom (Ruby) 
grieved hard when Uncle Johnnie passed away. She literally 
fainted at the grave site." 

When Johnnie's mother passed away, he inherited the Madsen 
homestead. He had his small trailer parked on the property and 
that's where he ran his cattle. The property was sold to Vernice 
Douglass and the money divided among the surviving sisters. 
The trailer was given to Mary Reynolds Madsen. 

Uncle Johnnie 
By: Marlene Sortor Anderson 

Sad was the day when the angels came and took you away to 

Your heavenly home on high 

Leaving us here on earth to cry 

But who deserves more a peaceful rest 

We have to understand that God knows best. 

But Oh! The countless who miss your smile 
How we wish you could be here awhile. 
Nieces, nephews, their husbands, children and wives 
You did so much to enrich all our lives. 

And, dear Aunt Amy's aching heart 

Will never completely mend 

For when she rides in those beautiful hills she'll 

Always expect you around the next bend. 

And, my mother already burdened with many a care 

Now has one more to bear. 

But on that day when we are called home 
and no longer carry a heavy load 
Who will meet us at that long, long road? 
Standing tall and straight and strong, 
Our wonderful Uncle John! 



106 



Johnnie William Madsen 




Johnnie William Madsen (above) holding Lavon Campbell while on a fishing trip in 1946. Connie 
Campbell and a neighbor girl play nearby. Courtesy Phil Campbell. Circa 1946. 








Phil Campbell (left) and the fish he caught on the same 
fishing trip with Johnnie William Madsen in 1946. 
Directly above: Lavon, Connie, and Noma Campbell. 
Courtesy Phil Campbell. 



107 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




M 

riagc license issued to Johnnie W. Madsen of Tetonia, Idaho, and Bessie Campbell of Tetonia, 

Idaho, at Dillon, Beaverhead County, Montana, on November 30, 1945. 



ar 



108 



Johnnie William Madsen 








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Marriage certificate issued to Johnnie W. Madsen and Bessie Campbell at Dillon, Montana. 
Witnesses to the marriage were Beatrice and Sive Fullmer of Tetonia, Idaho. 



109 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Riding in the hills on a warm summer day are Vernice Douglass, Johnnie Madsen, James Vernice 
Douglass, Ronnie Trout, and Teddy Miekelsen. Circa 1963. Courtesy Dorothy Douglass. 



1 10 



Johnnie William Madsen 




A typical Madsen reunion in Horseshoe Canyon probably in 1944. Identifiable in the foreground are 
Geneal Douglass Fullmer, Johnnie Madsen, Lavon Campbell, Bessie Campbell, and Doris Standen. 




Johnnie Madsen with two of his sisters: Lavina Whyte (center) and Stella Douglass. Circa early 1970s. 
Courtesy Merlyn R. Powell. 



Ill 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




One of the last photos taken of the seven remaining Madsen siblings is 
shown above. They are (left to right): Johnnie Madsen, Lavina Whyte, 
Stella Douglass, Ruby Sortor, Anna Thorsted, Luella Trout, and Amy 
Child. Circa 1965. Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



Funeral services for Johnnie William Madsen were held in Teton Basin 
at the Tetonia LDS Ward Chapel. His obituary is shown at right. 
Courtesy Merry F. Shaw 



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112 



Chapter 6 
LUELLA VIOLA MADSEN 

AND 
ROBERT WESLEY TROUT 




Luella Viola Madsen 

Trout, Melvin 

Wesley Trout, and 

Robert Wesley Trout. 

Circa 1960. 



Information 

for this chapter 

provided 

by Maxine 

Douglass Trout. 

Edited by Merry 

Foster Shaw. 



Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen 

Born: 10 May 1876, Gardner, Grundy, Illinois 
Died: 19 Jul 1943, Island Park Reservoir, Fremont, 
Idaho 



Married: Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm Madsen 

Born: 20 Feb 1864, Lystrup, Uvelse, 

Fredericksborg, Denmark 

Died: 7 Mar 1 932, Cache, Teton, Idaho 



Luella Viola Madsen 

Born: 20 Oct 1908, Cache, Fremont, Idaho 

Died: 22 Nov 1966, Sacramento, Sacramento, California 



Married: Robert Wesley Trout 

Born: 7 Jan 1909, Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Died: _ Sep 1983, Arco, Butte, Idaho 



Wesley Melvin Trout 

Born: 16 Jun 1930, Cache, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



William Leroy Trout 

Born: 18 Jul 1933, Doris, Siskiyou, California 
Died: Living 



Robert Lewis Trout 

Born: 7 Mar 1935, Crescent City, Del Norte, Cal. 
Died: Living 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout 



LUELLA VIOLA MADSEN 



1908 



The Madsen Family. 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 

Amy Pearl Madsen born 
August 4, 1912. 



(Maxine) "Luella Viola Madsen was born October 20, 1908, in 
Cache, Fremont County, Idaho. She was the seventh child of 
Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm (Bill) and Anna Marie (Mary) 
Hansen Madsen. She was raised in Teton Valley, sometimes 
living in Horseshoe Canyon in the summer and in the fall and 
winter she lived in Cache. 



Luella Viola Madsen Trout. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 

Ruby Nada Madsen born 
April 4, 1915 

Velna Syble Madsen born 
April 5, 1917 




Luella Viola Madsen 

at age seven or eight. 

Circa 1916. 



(Judy) "Aunt Luella was a natural comedian who enjoyed telling 
a good story and relished playing practical jokes. Her father 
was one of her favorite subjects. When she was about 12 years 
old, she stood behind her father with a salt shaker and, when he 
wasn't looking in her direction, sprinkled a little salt on his 
shoulder. Grandpa Madsen eventually noticed the white specks 
on his dark shirt and swatted them away. Aunt Luella waited a 
few minutes and shook the shaker again. This continued until 
she could no longer contain her giggles. Grandpa was amused 
but tried to contain his own laughter as he knew he would be the 
victim of another gag soon if Aunt Luella got too much attention 
over this one. 

"Another time when she was a bit older, Aunt Luella made a 
peach pie for dessert and could not get the pieces to come out of 
the pie tin. She improvised by spooning the pie, crust and all, 
into bowls. When she served Grandpa Madsen, he skeptically 
took the bowl and asked, 'What is this?' Aunt Luella replied, 
' Why, it 's French pudding, Dad. ' 'When did you learn to make 
French pudding?' he asked. 'Just today, Dad' Grandpa 
Madsen shook his head, rolled his eyes, and ate the dessert. 
Aunt Luella laughed heartily as she retold this story. Grandpa 
Madsen was very stern with his children and didn't tolerate 
much foolishness, but he had a soft spot for his dark-eyed 
daughter and her pranks. 



"Aunt Luella loved the Fourth of July. When she was quite 
young, she made up a song called 'Fourth of July Fun,' which 
she always sang. Aunt Luella would run around twirling the 



115 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



sparklers with all the kids singing and shouting, 'Fourth of July 
fun, the more they sparkle, the more we run.' My mom (Ruby) 
would laugh at Aunt Luella's antics but was too shy to join in." 



Letter to Cassandra Bird. 
(Child, Amy M., 1991) 



(Amy) "Luella had big brown eyes and long curly hair. She was 
the prettiest of the sisters. When she was young, she hurt her 
leg and got a big sore on it. The sore never healed up. She went 
through years with this bad sore leg. She kept it bandaged all of 
the time. The sore became worse with each new year." 



The Madsen Family. 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Maxine) "Luella enjoyed crocheting, cooking, and singing, and 
she loved to dance. 

"When she was 20 years old, she moved to Glenns Ferry, Idaho, 
to live with her sister, Stella, and family. She found work with 
Sheriff Babcock and his wife. They had no children but owned 
a very mean German police dog. Luella had to lock the dog in 
the basement whenever Stella brought her children, Maxine and 
Vernice, to visit." 



Conversation. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002) 



(Maxine) "Our visits to the Sheriff's house were really 
memorable for two reasons. I remember the German police dog 
very well, but the Sheriff also owned a refrigerator and we got 
to have iced tea with real ice cubes. 



"A traveling tent show came to town and that is how Luella met 
Wesley Trout. He played trumpet in the show and his brother, 
Lewis, played drums. Luella and Wes only knew each other 
three or four days when they decided to get married." 

ROBERT WESLEY TROUT 



International Genealogical Index. 
(LDS Church, Undated) 



Robert Wesley Trout was born January 7, 1909, in Twin Falls, 
Twin Falls County, Idaho. His parents were Lee Roy and 
Janette Gertrude Puckett Trout. He had one brother, Lewis L. 
Trout, born March 6, 1910, in Twin Falls, Idaho. 



116 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout 



His brother, Lewis, later married Luella's niece, Stella Maxine 
Douglass. Her parents were Orrin and Stella Douglass. 

Wes's parents were later divorced and each remarried. Janette, 
Wes's mother, married George Denton, and two boys were born 
to the Dentons: George Denton, Jr. (June) and Chet. 

LUELLA VIOLA MADSEN AND ROBERT WESLEY 
TROUT 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert 
Wesley Trout married June 22, 1929. 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout were married at 
the home of Bishop Rose in Glenns Ferry, Elmore, Idaho, on 
June 22, 1929. 



Various conversations. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002-2003) 

Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929. 
Beginning of Great Depression. 



(Maxine) "My parents drove an old Model 'T' Ford and they 
took Aunt Luella, Wes Trout, Vernice, and me across the Snake 
River to the Bishop's house for the ceremony. It was hotter than 
Hades that day and Vernice got a nose bleed from the heat. 
After the ceremony, Luella left with Wes and the traveling 
show." 



Wesley Melvin Trout 
born June 16, 1930. 



Wes and Luella spent the first few months of married life 
moving from place to place with the traveling tent show. Then 
in late 1929 or early 1930, they moved to Teton Valley where 
their first son, Wesley Melvin, was born on June 16, 1930, at the 
small cabin owned by Luella's parents. During their stay in the 
Basin, Wes joined the band in which Orrin Douglass played. 
They provided music for various dances and other gatherings in 
and around the Basin, sometimes traveling as far away as Idaho 
Falls, Idaho. 



Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm Madsen 
died March 7, 1932. 



On March 7, 1932, Luella's father passed away at the home of 
Orrin and Stella Douglass. There was a blizzard at the time of 
the funeral and those traveling to Teton Valley had to come by 
train. Luella's mother and two youngest sisters were living in 
St. Anthony, Idaho, at the time. 



17 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



William Leroy Trout 
born July 18, 1933. 

Robert Lewis Trout 
born March 7, 1935. 

Velna Syble Madsen Chinn 
died August 13, 1939. 



Two more sons were added to the family: William Leroy (Billy), 
born at Doris, California, on July 18, 1933; and Robert Lewis 
(Bobby) born at Crescent City, California, on March 7, 1935. 

In 1939, Luella's youngest sister, Velna, suffered a ruptured 
appendix. She passed away on August 13, 1939. She was just 
22 years old and the mother of a small daughter, Mary Shirlene 
Chinn. 



During the late 1930s and early 1940s, the family lived in Filer, 
Idaho. For a time, they lived with Wes's mother, Mrs. Denton. 



Various conversations. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2003-2004) 



(Maxine) "Luella sometimes had a problem thinking things 
through clearly. Wes had worn the knees out of an old pair of 
jeans and Mrs. Denton told Luella she ought to take some denim 
and patch those pants. Mrs. Denton left to run an errand and, 
while she was gone, Luella got busy and fixed the pants. When 
Mrs. Denton returned she took one look at the jeans and said, 
'What in the world have you done? ' Luella had gotten a newer 
pair of jeans out of the drawer, cut the legs off, and sewn them 
onto the worn pair. 



"Later that fall, Luella was helping Mrs. Denton make grape 
jelly. They boiled the grapes and strained them but, when they 
were ready to cook the jelly, Mrs. Denton realized she didn't 
have something she needed. She asked Luella to measure out 
the juice and sugar while she was gone to the store. When she 
returned, she looked around the kitchen in pure shock. Luella 
had filled every cup in the house with either juice or sugar. She 
had cups everywhere and explained she couldn't finish because 
she ran out of cups." 

Wes learned to play the organ and worked in a booth at the 
county fair selling organs. 

Luella's mother, Mary Madsen, traveled by bus to visit her 
daughter and family, arriving just after Christmas 1940. 



MX 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout 



Personal Diary. (Mary) January 1, Wednesday: "/ came last Monday. I ate 

(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 

dinner with Luella. We had two chickens, mashed potatoes, 
sweet potatoes, gravy, green tomatoes, pies, fruitcake, 
cranberries, coffee, pickles, and dressing. It is very cold. " 

January 4, Sunday: "Luella and I went to Twin Falls today 
with Mr. Turner. We took the town in. Had a good time. Luella 
gave me a little house. Sure cute. We ate hamburgers and 
banana splits in Newberry 's store and got home at six o 'clock. 
We had wieners and sour kraut. Wes and I played Saul. Luella 
started to make hotpot holders. We went to bed at 1:00 o 'clock. 
Not so cold. " 

January 7, Tuesday: "Luella went to a club in Twin Falls with 
Mrs. Turner. It rained this morning. The snow is almost all 
gone. The water is standing all over. Wes fed sheep and almost 
got smothered! I had supper ready when they came home. It is 
Wes 's birthday. We had cake. He felt much better toward 
Luella. She tried on corsets at 12 midnight. " 

January 8, Wednesday: "Luella didn 't start the day out right 
— spilt a gallon of melted lard. Things are pretty slick. It is 
wash day again today. Snow is gone and it 's warm and muddy. 
Wes is working hauling potatoes. Had company — Watkins man. 

He sure could sling the . / bought a 25 cent soap to get 

my calendar. It is just like summer." 

January 9, Thursday: "Luella and I didn't do much of 
anything today. Wes went to Twin Falls and came home at 5. 
He has a little of Grant 's disease-no talky. When we got ready 
for bed, I was undressed and stood in my bloomers. Wes walked 
in and we both hollered 'Hi, ' and [he] turned out into the 
kitchen." 

January 10, Friday: "We slept with all the windows and door 
open. The cats came and jumped on my bed. I sure had a 
time. " 



119 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



January 1 1, Saturday: ""Slept in. Didn 7 hear anything until 
the neighbor man came for Wes to go to work. Wes threw things 
right and left until he got his clothes on. Luella, the kids, and I 
didn 7 get up until 8 o 'clock. Kids saw a green car going down 
the road, which was the Trout car. Sure caused some 
excitement around here. Luella tried to jump the bare wire 
fence but couldn 7. The car passed and they waved at her. It is 
just like spring here. No snow but mud, mud, mud. " 

January 13, Monday: "Luella is going to wash today. The 
pump was frozen so Wes couldn 7 get water. Luella went out 
and got it thawed out. Wes went to work for Turner in the 
potatoes. We saw the green car again this morning. Luella 
went to town with Mr. Turner to get her commodities but didn 7 
get them. Wouldn 7 let her in. She did not feel too good about 
it. 

January 16, Thursday: "Mrs. Denton came over and took 
Luella, Wes, and I to Twin Falls. Luella got her commodities. 
Sure was glad. Wes went to the show. Mrs. Denton gave Luella 
a hamburger. We stayed up till 12 o 'clock. " 

January 17, Friday: "Luella is cleaning house. I stamped 
some patterns. Wes is playing solitaire. The snow is going 
fast. " 

January 18, Saturday: "We slept until Wo 'clock. It is cloudy 
and warm. Didn 7 eat dinner but had a good supper. Wes gave 
Bobby a good whipping with a hose and Luella got mad and 
spouted off. Wes walked out. Went to Shorty's. Wasn't long till 
Luella made an excuse to go next door to Shorty 's. I looked 
down the road in about 10 minutes and here they came down the 
road like love birds. Billy had a tooth ache and we didn 7 go to 
bed until 2 o 'clock. I packed my suit case today. " 

January 19, Sunday: "Slept until 9:30. Just got through 
breakfast when a big car full of company came. Wesley 's Aunt 
Frankie, Uncle Fide, his cousins Ernie, Dorothy, Marjorie, and 



120 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout 



Curt. Sure did like them all. They sure brought good eats: 
chicken, salad, bread, and eggs. " 

January 20, Monday: "Going home today. Mrs. Denton took 
Luella and me to the bus this morning. The bus leaves at 
10:55. " 

In April 1941, Mary again traveled to Twin Falls to visit with 
Luella and her family. Nell drove and took her two children, 
Bill and Doris. 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 




Luella Madsen and Wesley Trout. 



(Mary) April 18, Friday: "I got up early and got ready so I 
could go to Twin Falls. Nell came and got me at 11 o 'clock. I 
ate dinner with them then we left at 1 o 'clock. Bill, Nell, Doris, 
and I. We got to Luella 's at 4:30. Luella sure got surprised. 
Bill had car trouble and we waited supper until 9 o 'clock. We 
went to bed at midnight. Bill and Wes talked all night. Nell, 
Doris, and I slept on the front porch. " 

April 19, Saturday: "Nell, Bill, Luella, Doris, all the boys, and 
myself went to Twin Falls this afternoon. We came home and 
got supper. Nell, Luella, and I talked. Wes, Bill, and Doris and 
Melvin played till 3:45 in the morning. We went to bed at 
11 o 'clock, but could not sleep for them. They made too much 
noise.'''' 

April 20, Sunday: "We had a good dinner then we had a 
picture taken of us all. Then we left for home at 2:45. Got 
home at 6:35. Everything was okay, only five little chickens had 
died. Too cold. " 



In September 1941, Nell and Doris took Mary to visit Luella and 
her family. 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 



(Mary) September 12, Friday: "Nell, Doris, and 1 went to see 
Luella. When we got there, no one was home. Had gone to the 
rodeo. Got there at 8 o 'clock, started out at 4. Luella and Wes 



121 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



came home at 10:45. Saw a light in the house. They were 
scared someone was in the house. We were out in the car. Nell 
got stuck in a ditch. We had supper at 12 o 'clock, then Doris 
and the boys went to bed. Nell and Wes went to bed at 1. Luella 
and I washed the dishes and visited until 3, then went to bed and 
talked until 4. " 

September 13, Saturday: "Got up at 7 o'clock. Ate breakfast. 
Nell took Wes to work. Got dinner and visited, then got supper. 
Then we went to Twin Falls in the afternoon. We went over to 
see Mrs. Denton. Came home and went to bed about 10:30. " 

September 14, Sunday: "We got up at 8 o'clock and got 
breakfast. Cleaned up the work, then got dinner. Washed the 
dishes, then we ate watermelon. Nell, Luella and Wes moved 
the black stove out on the porch and moved her own in. Then 
we left for home at 4 o 'clock and got home at 8. Nell took me 
home and dumped me off. I did not want to go home for I did 
not have anything to eat in the house. Amy was in bed. I went 
to bed" 

In October, Mary again traveled to Twin Falls to visit Luella. 
She traveled with Ruby and Howard Sortor and their children. 
Her sister, Amy, and her children were also included in this trip. 
(One must wonder how they all got in one car!) 

(Mary) October 24, Friday: "Howard, Ruby, kids, and myself 
Personal Diary. went to Idaho Falls and got Amy and kids and went to Twin 

Falls. We left Amy 's at 4 and got to Luella 's at 8:30. We could 
not find her place till 10 o'clock. They were in bed. We ate 
supper, then put the kids to bed. We visited until 2, then went to 
bed. " 



October 25, Saturday: "We got up at 6:30. Wes had to go to 
work in the bean house. Luella works too but she did not work 
today. Luella and I walked to the store and got some groceries. 



22 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout 



Howard, Ruby, Amy and us went to Twin Falls. Ruby got her 
wall paper and her little lamp. Then Howard, Wes, and Luella 
went to Twin Falls. They came home and put the kids to bed at 
12 o 'clock. Howard and Wes made me, Ruby, and Amy a 
chicken sandwich." 

October 26, Sunday: "Got up, ate breakfast. We sat around 
until 10 o 'clock. We took a sandwich and left at 1:30. Came 
home at 5:30, then came to the Basin. Came home at 8 o 'clock. 
Everything was okay when we got home. " 



Various e-mails. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2002-2003) 



(Marlene) "I always loved going to visit Aunt Luella. There 
were so many people crammed in her little house that we slept 
wherever there was a space. My bed was an overstuffed chair 
and matching ottoman." 



Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor 
December 7, 1941. World War II. 



Mary again wrote regarding a trip to visit Luella. She obtained 
a ticket to ride the Greyhound Bus and stayed through New 
Years Day. 



Personal diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 



(Mary) December 29, Monday: "Went (walked) to town to see 
how much tickets were: $6.62. 1 was short. Went home and 
borrowed 25 cents from Amy. Am going to Filer in the morning. 
It snowed hard today. " 



December 30, Tuesday: "Got up early and started out for the 
bus. Got a ride. Boy 1 was glad. Got to the bus station at 
9 o'clock. The ticket was only $6.46. The bus didn't leave until 
10. Snowed all day. Bus was an hour late getting into Filer. 
Got into Filer at 4:25. Luella and the kids came to meet me. 
We had supper and sat up till 12 o 'clock. Wes got home at 
10:30. " 

December 31, Wednesday: "Luella got up first. 1 got up 
second. She went to work. Wes, the kids, and 1 had hot cakes. 
At 9:30, Wes went and got two roosters for New Year's dinner. 
He left for Twin at noon to work in the Brunswick. Damn old 
pool hall. Luella got paid today. Brought home groceries. Got 



123 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Luella 's dinner. Had hamburger. Sure is cold tonight. Snowed 
all day. " 



1942 



January 1, 1942, Thursday, New Years: "Got up at 8:30. 
Sure is very cold. Had sausage and toast for breakfast. Luella, 
the kids, and I ate dinner alone. Wes walked to Twin to play 
cards. We had a good dinner. Had chicken, dressing, gravy, 
celery, and cake, hot rolls, sweet potatoes. It snowed a little this 
morning but the sun came out about noon.'''' 




Luella Trout (left) with her mother, 

Mary Madsen, and sister, 

Lavina Powell at St. Anthony, 

Idaho. Circa 1942. 



January 2, Friday: "Luella went to work. It is cold, it was 
9 below zero this morning. Wes went to play cards. Darn the 
cards. Luella had a hair cut and curl this morning. Almost cut 
it all off. Is she mad. She doesn 't look bad at all. " 

January 3, Saturday: "Luella went to work. I had her dinner 
cooked and on the table when she came home. Wes is going to 
play again. I made some good soup for supper.'''' 

January 5, Monday: "Luella went to work. The kids started 
school this morning. Wes is playing again today. " 

January 6, Tuesday: "Very cold. Snowing and blowing. Wes 
has gone to Twin Falls. Luella picking beans. Melvin came 
home at 3 o 'clock as he got hurt in the eye. I baked bread 
today. " 

January 7, Wednesday: "Luella sick in her head this morning. 
She went to work anyway. She didn 't eat her dinner. I had 
cherry pie. It 's Wes 's birthday today but he is up in the card 
room. " 

January 8, Thursday: "Wes didn 't come home last night" 

January 9, Friday: "We didn 't get up too early. Luella don 7 
work today. We washed and cleaned the house. I made 
doughnuts. Mrs. Lee came tonight. 



124 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout 



"Luella hits the trail again in the morning. She fetched in the 
grub today. Billy and Bobby brought me a calendar this noon. 
We are alone again tonight. " 

January 10, Saturday: "/ baked bread today and pie. Billy 
and Bobby got in a bad fight. Wes quit the pool hall tonight. 
Luella sure is glad. He is going to get another job.''' 

January 11, Sunday: "Didn 't get up till 9 o 'clock. We did the 
work and Mrs. Denton came to get us. We ate a good dog bake. 
Aunt Frankie was there. She got her big toe cut off. Wes starts 
work at the service station in the morning, and are we tickled. 
We can eat bacon now. It is pretty cold tonight." 



Memories. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004) 



(Marlene) "When I was eight years old, Grandma Madsen took 
Mel, Bill, and Bob Trout and me to the tabernacle in Idaho Falls 
where we were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ 
of Later-day Saints. None of our parents were there and I don't 
remember why the Trout brothers were there either. Mel Trout 
was 12 years old at the time, Bill was 10, and Bob was eight." 



1943 

Mary Madsen, Nell Standon, Thelma 

Standon, and daughter Sandra 

drowned July 19, 1943. 

Conversations. 
(Freeman, Joy F., Undated) 



Germany surrendered on 

May 7, 1945. 

Japan surrendered on 

September 2, 1945. 



(Joy) "Our family reunion was usually held close to my 
mother's birthday, which was July 18. We met at the park in 
St. Anthony. Uncle George and Aunt Nell Standon stayed that 
night with Mother and, the next morning, gathered their things 
and said they were going to drive up to Island Park Reservoir to 
go fishing. They agreed to leave Doris with my mother and 
sisters. Grandma Madsen loved to fish and asked to go along. 
It was her first and last boat ride. The boat developed a leak and 
slowly sank. George and Nell's son, Bill, daughter-in-law, and 
granddaughter were also in the boat when it went down. My 
grandmother died of a heart attack. The only ones to survive 
were Uncle George and Bill. It was really a tragic experience." 



Wes got a job working for the railroad in Pocatello, and he and 
Luella made their home there. 



125 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Luella remained close to her family throughout the years as 
evidenced by her sister, Lavina's, diaries. 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M, 1947-1951) 



(Lavina) July 3, 1948, Saturday: ""Luella, Wes, and Billy came 
at about 3:30. They stayed all night" 

July 4, 1948, Sunday: "Luella and Wes left this morning to go 
with Ruby and family on a picnic. " 

October 2, 1949, Sunday: "We . . . drove up to Stell's. Maxine 
and family, Wes and Luella were there.' 1 '' 

April 29, 1950, Saturday: "Luella and boys came up early this 
a.m. Billy and Bobby are helping clean out the ditches.'''' 

May 1, 1950, Monday: "Billy and Bobby came back today to 
work on the ditches. It rained so they didn 't work too much. " 

October 4, 1950, Wednesday: "Went down to Luella 's 
tonight.'''' 

October 5, 1950, Thursday: "Ate lunch in the cafe where 
Luella works." 



"The Madsen Family." 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



Memories. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004) 



In about 1950, when Bobby was about 15 years old, Wes and 
Luella were divorced. 

(Marlene) "After we moved to Firth, Mel, Bill, and Bob Trout 
lived with us for a time. We loved to play Monopoly and Bill 
begged us to play. He was the middle boy and inevitably he lost 
his temper and the board went flying in the air and the pieces 
went everywhere and we had a mess to clean up. He got so 
mad! Then later he'd beg us to play again. 



Conversations. 
(Henson, Beverly S., 2005) 



(Beverly) "While Wes and Luella lived in Pocatello, they really 
struggled for money and, in order to feed her boys, she once in 
a while stole milk from her neighbors porch." 



126 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout 



"I married at a very young age and really picked wrong. We 
weren't married very long when I decided it would be best to get 
a divorce. However, I was already pregnant with my little girl, 
Darla Rae. I moved home and got a job to help support myself 
and my baby. While I was pregnant, I craved rhubarb and that 
sweetheart, Aunt Luella, kept me supplied by stealing it from 
other people's gardens. She was pretty brash, but a lot of fun. 
I am a lot like her!" 



Luella Viola Madsen Trout. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 




Luella and Vicki Lou Bock. 
Circa 1958. 



(Judy) "Aunt Luella was blessed with the Madsen strength of 
character and work ethic. She worked as a waitress for many 
years and as a hotel maid. Even though these jobs were 
physically taxing, she never complained of being tired or 
mentioned any dislike for her job. She never learned to drive 
and so walked to work, the store, or any other place she went. 
My parents moved to Pocatello in 1950, and my mom and Aunt 
Luella became inseparable. The two sisters visited each other 
nearly every day and spoke on the telephone daily. 

"Aunt Luella had many friends, among them Mae Peck and Beth 
Orr. But her best friend was Ruby. Aunt Luella and Ruby were 
different in many ways. Aunt Luella was gregarious and 
demonstrative. Ruby was introverted and reserved. Aunt Luella 
enjoyed having an audience, while Ruby preferred to remain 
unnoticed in the background. Together they shared tears and 
laughter. 



"Howard and Ruby included Aunt Luella on family vacations. 
One such vacation was to Yellowstone Park in 1953, when bears 
still remained a major attraction. A couple of bears were on the 
road drawing the attention of many tourists and their cameras. 
Aunt Luella got out of the car, approached the bears within a 
safe distance and put on a show for the tourists. She crept near 
the bears and then turned and ran shrieking. These antics 
continued until the bears grew weary and the tourists were out 
of film. Aunt Luella, chuckling, returned to the car to find 
Howard and Ruby laughing so hard tears streamed down their 
cheeks. Howard had to pull over to regain his composure before 



127 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



driving on, only to pull over again after a few minutes when he 
started laughing all over again. 

"Aunt Luella and Ruby dieted and exercised together over the 
years. Aunt Luella, due to lack of financial resources, often did 
not wear anything under her dresses. During some of the 
exercise routines, she would pull her dress down and yell out, 
'Billie bush tail, Ruby!' Laughter dominated the exercise 
sessions after that. 

"Aunt Luella had a dog named Teddy. He was a big, furry, grey 
dog that was originally Melvin's. Aunt Luella loved Teddy and 
cared for him just as she would a child. 

"Being grown up did not stop Aunt Luella from playing jokes 
and pranks on others. Her wonderful sense of humor and gift 
for 'pulling one over' continued her entire life. She often put 
sugar in the salt shaker in Ruby and Howard's kitchen. She 
chuckled at the family's perplexed looks when eating sweet 
tasting eggs at breakfast and the grimaces when they bit into 
very sweet corn! Once she put salt in the sugar bowl, which 
made the oatmeal taste really strange. Ruby and Howard, upon 
returning from a trip to Idaho Falls, climbed into bed to find the 
sheets shorted. Aunt Luella telephoned first thing the next 
morning to ask if they had a good night's rest. Another time, 
Ruby and Howard climbed into bed to find it filled with soda 
cracker crumbs. 'Luella must have been here,' they said in 
unison. Whatever discomfort they felt was overshadowed by 
their laughter. 

"Aunt Luella lived in a duplex next to a newlywed couple: 
Orville and Wanda Sortor Bock. Orville was new to the family 
and a bit shy, making him an easy target for Aunt Luella's 
pranks. Wanda packed lunch each day for Orville containing 
gourmet sandwich spreads and special treats, which he very 
much enjoyed. However, after a few weeks he began to wonder 
why his lunch occasionally contained a raw potato or the hard 
cooked eggs wore Easter colors in July. Sometimes he found a 



I2X 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout 



large hunk of cabbage or some other strange food. When 
Orville finally got up the nerve to ask his new bride about her 
special lunch box treats, Wanda immediately knew where to 
turn for the culprit. The laughter and pranks continued. 




Bob Trout with Wanda Sortor. 
Circa 1953. 



"One of Aunt Luella's prized possessions was her color 
television. She frequently invited her nieces and nephews to 
watch it with her. She would adjust the color to perfection, step 
back, and adjust it again and again. A sleep-over at Aunt 
Luella's was a complete pampering experience. She always 
fixed a wonderful dinner that she served on a table with a fresh- 
cut flower arrangement or a blooming house plant. Dinner was 
followed, of course, with an evening of watching the cherished 
television. She tucked her guests into bed with big fluffy quilts 
and blankets. Morning greeted the visitors with smells of bacon 
and pancakes coming from the kitchen. 

"Aunt Luella loved the Lawrence Welk Show and Liberace. 
She simply wilted when Liberace winked at the television 
camera. Aunt Luella raved about how gorgeous and talented 
Liberace was, and she emphatically declared that he treated his 
mother very well. 



"Aunt Luella demonstrated artistic talent and ingenuity when 
furnishing her homes. Her last home was a basement house in 
Pocatello. Her cut flower arrangements looked as if a 
professional had done them. Aunt Luella cut flowers from her 
yard and arranged and shared them with others. Even though 
her financial resources were limited, she improvised so well that 
no one noticed. Her home was cozy and warm." 



Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005) 



(Wanda) "When Beverly was in labor with her first baby, Aunt 
Luella and I went to the hospital with her. Mom didn't go, she 
was too sensitive to be part of that kind of ordeal. We went to 
St. Anthony Hospital in Pocatello. At that time the labor room 
was just that, one big room filled with beds divided by drawn 
curtains, with all these women in various stages of labor. 



129 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"Aunt Luella was so tender-hearted that she ran from bed to bed 
saying, 'Are you having a pain, honey? Are you having a pain ? ' 
She was all over the ward tending to all those women and then 
back to Beverly. What a sight." 



Letter to Merry F. Shaw. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2003) 



(Marlene) "Aunt Luella was such a loving, kind-hearted woman 
and also very funny. She had a lot of sorrow in her life, but she 
never let it get her down. Sometimes she shocked my very shy, 
reserved mother with what she said. No topic was off limits 
with Aunt Luella. I often laughed so hard at her I was sick! I 
still miss her a lot." 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1953-1957) 



(Lavina) July 15, 1957, Monday: "Stell and Ilene came at 9:30 
and we went down to Pocatello and had dinner with Ruby. 
Luella was there.'" 



Conversations. 
(Caron, Marge P., 2002) 



(Marge) "Mom (Lavina), Michael, and I went to see Aunt Luella 
at her basement apartment, which was on Jefferson Street in 
Pocatello. We stopped outside and beeped the horn. She came 
up the stairs and looked at us for a long time. Finally, she threw 
her hands in the air and said, 'Look, it's my folks. They've come 
to see me. ' I've never seen anyone so excited to have company. 
We went in and she fussed about feeding us and making us 
comfortable. She was quite a lady." 



Memories. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004) 



(Marlene) "Aunt Luella was so terrified of thunder and 
lightning. So was my mom (Ruby). I remember a terrible storm 
one night while we lived in Pocatello. It was the middle of the 
night and the thunder just rolled and cracked with big streaks of 
lightning. Aunt Luella was so frightened she ran all the way 
from her basement apartment to our house in the storm. It was 
about five or six blocks but she was not staying alone through 
that storm." 



130 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout 



Luella is again mentioned in her sister Lavina's diaries: 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1958-1961) 




Bob Trout with some of his family. 
The little girl may be his daughter, 

Danielle. 



(Lavina) March 27, 1958, Thursday: "Johnnie, Luella, and 
Ruby came and had dinner and spent the day. We went to Addie 
Tressel 's show. Was real good. " 

December 17, 1959, Thursday: "Went down to Pocatello and 
spent the day with Ruby and Luella. Is a nice day. " 

March 8, 1960, Tuesday: "This afternoon we went to 
Pocatello. Stopped at Ruby's. Saw Luella there, too." 

August 17, 1961, Wednesday: "Ruby called me. Luella is in 
the hospital. Went down to see her.'''' 

December 6, Thursday: "We went to Pocatello and spent the 
day with Luella. Had a nice visit." 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1963-1967) 



(Lavina) January 30, 1962, Wednesday: "Howard Sortor 
called. Luella is in the hospital. " 

January 31, 1963, Thursday: "Luella is being operated on 
today." 

February 3, 1963, Sunday: "Went down to see Luella at the 
hospital. It rained again." 

April 28, 1963, Sunday: "Drove down to Pocatello and saw 
Ruby and Luella. It rained again." 



Luella Viola Madsen Trout. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "Aunt Luella had a very generous heart. She shared her 
possessions and her time. Her three sons and grandchildren 
were the joy of her life. She regularly sent gifts to her beloved 
sons and their children. She displayed their photographs 
proudly in her home. Luella had a coffee table with a recessed, 
glass covered top under which she kept her cherished photos. 



131 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"She enjoyed telling guests about each one of them. Aunt 
Luella wrote many letters to her children and grandchildren and 
anxiously awaited their replies. She carried their letters in her 
purse and read them to Ruby and her family, and anyone else 
who would listen." 



'The Madsen Family" 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Maxine) "Luella later married Paul Bluhme; they were 
divorced in 1965." 



Memories. 
(Shaw, Merry F., Undated) 



(Merry) "On August 6, 1966, we held our annual family reunion 
at the city park in Rexburg, Idaho. Aunt Luella was diagnosed 
with cancer several years earlier and had undergone treatments 
and several surgeries. I remember my mother commenting on 
how thin and tired she looked. She seemed in very high spirits, 
however, and commented to her brother and sisters, 'I'm going 
to find a husband. I'm not spending another winter alone. "' 



My Fond Memories of My Son, 

My Baby. 

(Child, Amy M., Undated) 



Terry Child bought a sporty little Chevrolet convertible and took 
his mom, Amy, to Pocatello to bring her sister, Luella, to Firth 
to stay for a few days. She was working at a motel and, "we 
drove all the way to the motel with the top down and our hair 
just blowing in the wind. Luella loved riding in this snazzy car. 
One night, Terry took her for a ride with the top down. Her hair 
was blowing and she was laughing and having a ball. This was 
not long before she died. " 



Luella Viola Madsen Trout. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "Even when Aunt Luella was very ill, in 1966, she 
continued to work and walk everywhere, as usual. She walked 
from her place of work several blocks to the hospital to visit me 
when my son, Dan Sheldon, was born on September 3, 1966. 
She appeared in my room early in the evening. She fussed over 
the baby and then asked, 'Did the doctor give you anything for 
the pain?' At the time, no one knew she was the one in great 
physical pain as she had not let any of her family know how ill 
she was. One week later, Aunt Luella was taken to the hospital 
where she was diagnosed with inoperable cancer. Her question 
about pain still rings in my ears as well as my response that I 
was not in pain." 



132 



Conversation. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002) 



Luella Viola Madsen and Robert Wesley Trout 



(Maxine) "Mel vin, who was career Air Force, went to Idaho and 
got his mother. They had a big van of some kind and stopped at 
my place in Twin Falls for just a few minutes so I could see her. 
She really looked bad. Mel took her home with him to 
Sacramento where he and Kay cared for her." 



Conversations. 
(Caron, Marge P., 2002) 



(Marge) "On November 19, 1966, my sister Merry and I went 
to visit Aunt Luella while she was staying with Mel. He was 
living way out of Sacramento somewhere and we got lost out on 
those dark roads. We finally came to a fire station and asked 
directions and found his home. Merry and I gave Aunt Luella 
a necklace and earrings. She had so few nice things and we 
wanted to do something special for her. She was so pleased she 
just cried." 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M, 1963-1967) 



Luella Viola Madsen Trout passed away on November 22, 1966. 

(Lavina) November 26, 1966, Saturday: "Went up to Tetonia 
to Luella 's funeral. The roads were slick going up. " 

Luella was buried in the Cache-Clawson Cemetery at Tetonia, 
Idaho. 



Luella Viola Madsen Trout. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "Aunt Luella was one in a million. She was beautiful, 
witty, warm, and loving." 



Various Conversations. 
(Trout, Maxine D., 2002-2003) 



(Marlene) "I always liked Wes. He was a very kind man and 
soft-spoken. He passed away in September 1983." 



Wesley Melvin Trout married Kay . She is of Irish 

decent but was born in Newfoundland. Mel was career Air 
Force and is now retired. He and Kay live in Newcastle, 
California. 

William Leroy Trout 



133 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Luella Viola Madsen Trout. 
Circa 1960. 



Robert Lewis Trout married Yvonne Gayle Windsor and 
settled in Las Vegas, Nevada. Bob and Yvonne had seven 

children. They were later divorced. He then married , 

and had one more daughter, Danielle. 

Kathy Trout married Daniel Bourgeous. Dan served a 
mission to San Antonia, Texas. They live near Phoenix, 
Arizona. 



Funeral program (below) for Luella Viola Madsen Trout. 



IN MEMORY OF 

JLueLLa ^JJ{aa±zn. ^Jiout 

Born - October 20, 1908 
Cache, Idaho 

Died - November 22. 1961) 
Sacramento, California 

Services At 
Tetania L.D.S. Ward Chapel 
inlay. November 26, 1966 - 1:00 p.m. 
Bishop Lyle Smith, Conducting 

Floral Arrangements 

Tetonia Relief Society Presidency 

Lois Hansen - Ella Beard 

Zella Fullmer - Stella Douglass 

Flower Girls - Nieces 

Casket Bearers 
oW Chikls William Why:.- 

Anderson Vfelvin Trouf 

Billy Trout Bobbie Trom 

Interment in the Cache-C law-son Cemetery 



SERVICES 

Family Prayer Virgil Powell 

Prelude Music Merlyn Powell 

Invocation Chester Denton 

Musical Number - - - - "Oh My Father'" 
Marian Trout 

Life Sketch Vernice Douglass 

Speaker Lloyd Miekelsen 

Musical Number "Face to Face" 

Richard Egbert 

Benediction Lewis Trout 

Postlude Merlyn Powell 

Dedicatory Prayer - - - Bishop Lyle Smith 



134 



Chapter 7 
AMY PEARL MADSEN 

AND 

JOHN WESLEY GOODSON, 

EMMETT NOEL HUBBARD, AND 

HAROLD THOMAS CHILD 




Amy Pearl Madsen. 
Circa 1930. 



Information for this 
chapter taken from 
writings of Amy Pearl 
Madsen and interviews 
by Stella Maxine 
Douglass Trout. 
Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen 

Born: 10 May 1 876, Gardner, Grundy, Illinois 
Died: 19 Jul 1943, Island Park Reservoir, Fremont, 
Idaho 



Married: Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm Madsen 

Born: 20 Feb 1864, Lystrup, Uvelse, 

Fredericksborg, Denmark 
Died: 7 Mar 1932, Cache, Teton, Idaho 



Amy Pearl Madsen 

Born: 4 Aug 1912, Cache, Fremont, Idaho 
Died: 1 9 Jul 2002, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 



Married: John Wesley Goodson 

Born: 1 Nov 1910, Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Died: Mar 1987, Arco, Butte, Idaho 



Elvin Wesley Goodson 

Born: 3 Jul 1930, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Amy Jeanice Goodson 

Born: 14 Dec 1931, St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Harold Thomas Child 

Born: 17 Oct 1915, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: 4 Nov 1 984, Provo, Utah, Utah 



Married: Emmett Noel Hubbard 

Born: 9 Feb 1905, Centertown, Ohio, Kentucky 
Died: 29 Sep 1973, Riverside, Orange, California. 



Shirley Jean Hubbard 

Born: 6 Jan 1936, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard 

Born: 3 Aug 1937, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard 

Born: 14 Jan 1941, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Harold Terry Child 

Born: 22 Aug 1946, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



AMY PEARL MADSEN 



1912 



Amy Pearl Madsen 
born August 4, 1912. 

Child, Amy M., in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



The Madsen family was living in the Gale Store in Cache, 
Teton, Idaho, when Amy Pearl was born. 

(Amy) "I was born on August 4, 1912, to Hans Christian Peter 
Wilhelm (Bill) and Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen Madsen in 
Teton Valley. I was the eighth child born to their family of 10 
children. There were eight girls and two boys born to this 
family." 



"Mm 




~. tuft T»;oc IN**.* 



Amy's drawing of the original one- 
room cabin and adjacent two-room 
building and outhouse. 



When Amy was six months old, she and her family moved into 
the log cabin at what is now known as 3 rd West and Packsaddle 
Road, a little less than two miles from Tetonia, Idaho. Amy's 
father bought an existing structure from Henry Mickelsen. The 
building was torn down and each log marked with notches, then 
reassembled in the same order into the cabin where the family 
lived for many years. Their new home was only about two 
blocks from the Gale Store where Amy's mother baked bread, 
which she sold for 5 cents a loaf, and churned butter, which she 
sold for 15 cents a pound. 



The new log cabin was very small for a family of nine so an 
additional structure was built just to the north of the cabin. It 
consisted of a living room area with one bed and bedroom where 
most of the children slept. The family's clothes and belongings 
were kept here. A pot-bellied stove was placed in the living 
room but fires were rarely built and Amy recalls heating rocks 
and placing them in her bed before bedtime to warm the 
mattress and blankets. Several years later, Bill bought the old 
wooden tithing granary from the LDS Church and attached it to 
the small cabin. This turned the cabin into the structure that 
exists today. 



Cache Ward Records. 
(LDS Church, Undated) 



On October 3, 1912, Amy was given a blessing in The Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Bishop R.G. Meikle, at 
Cache, Teton, Idaho. 



137 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Child, Amy M., in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 

Anna Christina Madsen and 
Harold Peter Thorsted married 
November 2, 1912. 



(Amy) "The names of my sisters and brothers are as follows: 
Anna Christina, Lavina Marie, Nellie Sophia, Viggo, Stella 
Rose, our dear brother William Johnnie, Luella Viola, Ruby 
Nada, and Velna Syble. This dear baby sister died when she 
was only 22 years old of a ruptured appendix. Our first little 
brother died when he was 14 months old, before I was born, so 
I didn't ever see him. His name was Viggo but the family all 
called him Hermy. He died of complications of the measles." 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M, 1971) 



(Amy) "My brother, Johnnie, was eight years old when I was 
born and it always seemed like I was his pal. He would always 
say, 'Amy, run get ...(this or that thing he needed).' I was with 
him a lot. I especially remember cutting the tails off his little 
lambs. He built a big bonfire and placed a gunny sack on the 
snow. Then he stuck an iron in the fire to heat. He cut the tails 
off the little lambs and I brought him the hot iron to cauterize 
the wound and stop the bleeding. Oh, I can still hear the searing 
sound of that hot iron and how the little lambs cried from the 
pain. It hurt them, but Johnnie explained it had to be done." 



Lavina Marie Madsen and 

William Henry Rathjens married 

October 27, 1917. 



"We had a dry farm in the mountains up Horseshoe Canyon and 
in the summer time we made our home on the dry farm. 

"I remember one time Ruby and I decided we wanted a little 
kitten we had seen quite far up in the mountains at a coal 
miner's home. We asked Mama if we could walk up there and 
get one of these little kittens. She let us go and told us to not 
tarry along the way or it would be dark for us to walk back. But 
being average kids, we kinda did the very thing she told us not 
to do. We played with the little cat along the way and it became 
dark just as Mama had told us it would. I remember how, when 
we realized how dark it was getting, we remembered Mama's 
words. We were very scared walking in those tall pine trees. 
The only thing we could hear was the creek that ran along the 
road. We were scared out there alone in the dark old mountains. 
We made it home all right, but I think it taught us both about 
obedience to our mother. 



138 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



"I truly found out what a brave mother I had when we climbed 
the high mountains looking for our cows. We stopped every 
little while to listen for the bells around the necks of two or 
three of the lead cows. One night we hunted for what seemed 
hours and we were climbing a mountain following a cow path 
through the trees and brush. Mama stopped suddenly and 
hushed me to be quiet. Then she pulled the branches back and 
looked ahead down the trail. Not more than two yards ahead 
stood a huge brown bear right in the middle of the path looking 
at us. We stood very still and soon the bear got down on all 
fours and trotted up the mountain and into the pines. Mama 
took my hand and we continued up the path searching for the 
cows. How brave she was. 




Amy Pearl Madsen. 
Circa 1920. 



"We three girls (Ruby, Velna, and I) had so much fun together. 
We didn't have much in the way of toys and play things, so we 
made our own things like cutting paper dolls and making little 
cars for them to ride in out of oatmeal boxes. We appreciated 
everything we had in those days. It was kind of fun growing up 
in the 1920s. We learned to work and earn our own money the 
hard way, like picking potatoes in the fall and cleaning homes 
and tending little kids for ladies in the neighborhood. 

"Mama made most of our clothes. She was so talented in so 
many ways. Mama made us underwear out of flour sacks, 
which she washed and bleached. When we needed a new dress, 
we picked one we liked out of the catalog, she looked at it, 
measured us, and made the dress to look just like it was store- 
bought. She was really a smart mother for us to have. We loved 
her very much. 



Nellie Sophia Madsen and 

George A. Standen married 

May 18, 1920. 



"I attended school in the little two-room school house just north 
of the cabin. I also had lots of chores to do after school 
including cleaning out the barn, putting feed in the manger for 
the cows, and getting the cows into their stables for the night. 
We had seven good milk cows and each had her own stable. 
The rest of the cattle stayed in the corral at night. It seemed that 
Mama, Johnnie, and I were the ones who milked the cows. 



139 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"It got so cold at night in the winter in the Basin that the milk 
would freeze against the bucket while we were milking. It was 
also one of my chores to draw water from the well and fill the 
reservoir on the side of the wood stove. This is how we heated 
all our water to wash dishes, faces and hands, floors, and for 
bathing. We took our baths in a galvanized wash tub. 

"I also learned to ride horses and I was a real tomboy. Once I 
was riding with Mark Loosli and my horse shied at something 
in the road and jumped sideways. I went right over his head and 
landed on my feet. 

"I always looked forward to having the threshing crew come 
because then Mama would cook such good food and so much of 
it. She always made pies, puddings, all kinds of meats, and 
good mashed spuds with country gravy. The threshers washed 
outside in a pan of water and used several towels to dry. Once 
the grain was threshed and the straw piled up, Ruby, Velna, and 
I would go out and play in that big mountain of straw. Oh! We 
had fun. 

"We didn't have much money but Mama always tried her best 
to provide a good and Merry Christmas for us. I remember her 
sending orders to the Montgomery Ward and Sears Roebuck 
catalogs for our Christmas gifts. There weren't any big malls 
and shops advertising three months before Christmas. Our 
Christmases were the most wonderful times of my growing up 
years. We all had the true spirit of the birth of our Savior Jesus 
Christ. We gave away our love and kindnesses to our friends 
and relatives. 

"We were all grateful for what we had. There wasn't any greed 
among us then at all. We usually got an orange and apple and 
maybe a couple little toys, and we loved that. Then we always 
had a good cooked Christmas dinner. I'll never forget Mama's 
suet pudding with good dip over the top. I can almost taste it 
now. 



140 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



"Mama raised her own turkeys so we had baked turkey stuffed 
with Mama's homemade dressing on that special day. 

"I remember the tiny prayer Ruby, Velna, and I said every night 
when we went to bed. Mama would listen to us and this was our 
prayer: 'Now I lay me down to sleep. I pray Thee Lord my soul 
to keep. If I should die before I wake, I pray Thee Lord my soul 
to take. Amen." Our last words were, 'Goodnight, Mama.' We 
always felt safe with Jesus watching over us with our mother's 
dear help." 



Cache Ward Records. 
(LDS Church, Undated) 



On September 3, 1921, Amy was baptized a member of The 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Chid, Amy M., 1971) 




Amy Pearl taken near the Madsen 
home in Teton Basin. Circa 1927. 



(Amy) "Ruby and I were reminiscing about a time she was sick 
and stayed home from school. Out of the blue, I decided to stay 
home, too. But Mama had a different opinion about it. She said 
I was going and I was determined I wasn't. Ruby and I both 
laughed as we remembered Mama chasing after me in the deep 
snow trying to hit me with the straw end of the broom. She 
chased me up over the potato cellar and I fell down in the deep 
snow. She hit me a few times with the straw but it didn't hurt. 
I was wearing a big winter coat and was all bundled up. She 
finally gave up and I stayed home. I was such a strong-willed 
little devil. Neither Ruby nor I could remember why I decided 
to stay home that day." 

When Amy was 15 years old, she decided to strike out on her 
own. She packed her few clothes in an empty flour sack and 
walked to the highway outside Tetonia, Idaho. Here she waited 
for a truck to give her a ride to her sister Nell's home in Idaho 
Falls. In those days, hitchhiking was not nearly as dangerous as 
it would become in later years. Amy was very lucky. A truck 
owned by her brother-in-law, George Standen, stopped and the 
driver offered to take her to her sister's home. 



1927 



Nell gladly took Amy in and found her a job thinning beets on 



141 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



a farm near Ammon. Here she became acquainted with the 
farmer's daughters, Ida and Eva Nelson, who were also working 
in the fields. There were several Mexican men working there as 
well. Amy stayed at the farm during the week and walked back 
to Idaho Falls on weekends. There was an old bunk house 
provided for the farm hands to stay in: the Mexican men stayed 
in one side and the girls in the other. "It was hard work for us 
girls. The rows were so long. Some times the men would help 
us with our rows, and we would be so glad for the help. " 



When Amy received her first paycheck, Nell took her shopping 
at the Kress Store in Idaho Falls. Amy had never been in such 
a big store and must have seemed like such a country bumpkin. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Amy) "I bought a dress for 49 cents, under pants for 15 cents, 
socks for 5 cents, and a silk nightgown. Ohhh, I loved it. It was 
red and cost me only 39 cents. I even bought braziers (bras), 
which I'd never had before. And lipstick!!! I also bought gifts 
to take home for my little sisters and, for my mother, a sewing 
basket, which cost me 79 cents. She'd never had one before. 



"One of Nell's friends called one day to tell her the city was 
going to hold a beauty contest as part of the Fourth of July 
celebration. Nell told me I should enter. I right away said, 'No, 
I can 't do that. I'm not nearly good enough. ' But Nell assured 
me I was as pretty as any of the other girls and insisted. I 
worried about this contest, and seriously considered telling Nell 
I was sick or something. I needed a swim suit and a pretty 
dress. Nell told me I could wear my new pink dress but I didn't 
own a swim suit. Nell took in one of hers so it would fit me. I 
was sure I could never walk in front of folks in that skimpy 
thing. 

"I had to be there at 9:00 a.m. so we could practice walking and 
such. The women in charge helped us fix our hair and said we 
needed ribbons, so Nell left to get hair ribbons for me and my 



142 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



friend, Eva Nelson. She was sooo pretty. I had to practice 
walking many times. They said I looked awkward, but I finally 
got it down well enough. The platform was decorated so pretty 
with lots of balloons and things. The time finally came for the 
competition. There were 26 girls entered and I came in sixth. 
Nell seemed excited that I even placed but I was humiliated. 
She and her friends talked about the contest for weeks afterward 
and I just wanted to forget it and talk about anything else." 

While Amy was at Nell's home, she was assigned housework to 
help pay for her board and room and also to help her sister, who 
was expecting a baby the next spring. Nell's husband, George, 
insisted Amy's long hair kept getting in the food, so one day 
Nell cut Amy's long wavy hair into a short bob. 

A carnival came to town that fall and Nell took her two children 
and Amy. 

(Amy) "I never in all my life saw anything like that carnival: the 

lights, the music, the merry-go-round, and the tilt-a-whirl!. That 

was my favorite. I wore one of my new dresses, silk stockings, 

< 
new shoes, and lipstick! Nell helped me with the lipstick so I Q 

wouldn't get it on too thick. 

"The next night my friends, Ida and Eva Nelson, called (Nell 
had a phone) and asked if I wanted to go to the carnival with 
them. Nell gave her permission and away we went. I still had 
some money left and rides were three for a dime. We had so 
much fun. About 10:00 p.m., we noticed three boys coming our 
way. Handsome young men all in their late teens." 

The boys introduced themselves to the three young girls. They 
were Leonard, Lloyd, and Wesley. That first night, Ida went 
with Wesley, Eva with Lloyd, and Amy went with Leonard. 
The boys gave the young girls a ride to Nell's house where the 
girls all spent the night on the front room floor. The next day 
the boys called and asked the girls to accompany them to the 
carnival. This night Amy went with Wesley Goodson. "He was 



143 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



the best looking one of the bunch: black hair and the deepest 
brown eyes you ever saw. He had really big eyes. He was so 
handsome." 

Wesley, who was 1 8 years old, kept coming around and soon 
brought his cousin, Jess Hill. Jess was also a handsome young 
man. He owned a car and one day Amy expressed a desire to go 
home for a visit. Wesley agreed and they traveled to the Basin 
where Amy introduced him to her family. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Amy) "On August 4, 1929, for my 16 th birthday, Wesley gave 
me a blue box camera (I still have it). Then we went with six 
other kids up Wolverine Canyon where three of the boys killed 
a rattle snake. They took the rattles off and put them on Jess 
Walker's hat." 



Wesley and Amy continued to date and he expressed his love for 
her. 

JOHN WESLEY GOODSON 



John Wesley Goodson 
born November 1, 1910. 



Letter to Jon Hansen. 
(Child, Amy M., 1993) 



John Wesley Goodson was born November 1, 1910, at Twin 
Falls, Twin Falls County, Idaho. He was the sixth of 1 1 
children born to Ezekiel John and Annie Elizabeth Labrum 
Goodson. Wes attended school at Idaho Falls, Osgood, and 
Roberts, Idaho. 

(Amy) "Wesley was a very good looking young fellow. He had 
coal black hair and big brown eyes. He was about 5 feet 10 
inches tall and weighed about 150 pounds." 



Obituary for John Wesley Goodson. 
(Jarvis, Delores R., 1987) 



(Delores) "Uncle Wes loved little children, the out-of-doors, and 
animals. The closer to the mountains he could live the better he 
liked it. He did not like living in a town because, he said, there 
were too many people. He spent most of his life working out of 
doors, mostly farming where he could be around the animals. 



144 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 




John Wesley Goodson. 



Amy Pearl Madsen and John Wesley 
Goodson married October 2, 1929. 



"When he was younger, Uncle Wes and his cousin, Jess Hill, 
were riding around Idaho Falls, Idaho, in a car. They heard a 
fire siren and pulled off the road so the engine could go by, and 
wound up on the sidewalk. Farther down the sidewalk at the 
corner was an Evangelist Preacher delivering his message. They 
decided to drive down the sidewalk and see if they could scare 
him. He started running so they chased him for a block. Wes 
loved to have fun, but never did any harm to anyone. 

"He loved to fish and hunted only to supply meat to eat. He had 
a very tender heart toward all animals. For a time, he worked at 
a sawmill at Spencer, Idaho, along with his parents, a brother, a 
sister, and their families. After work the men would hurry home 
to get their families and a lunch, and hurry off to the streams to 
fish. 

"Uncle Wes loved the color red. Had he been able to, he would 
have had everything painted red. He was a jolly, fun-loving 
person who loved to laugh." 




AMY PEARL MADSEN AND JOHN WESLEY GOODSON 

When they decided to get married, Amy and Wes borrowed four 
dollars from her sister, Stella, to buy the wedding license and 
other things the young couple needed. Then they walked along 
the railroad tracks to Driggs to get the license, where Wes listed 
his place of residence as Anaconda, Deer Lodge, Montana. 
Amy Pearl Madsen and John Wesley Goodson were married in 
the living room of the cabin owned by her parents on October 2, 
1929, by Bishop John Buxton, who lived nearby. 

(Amy) "I first became aware of politics in 1929 when the 
depression hit. Kids at that young age don't pay much attention 
to politics, so my first recollection was when Hoover was 
President of the United States. He was a Republican. 



Amy Pearl and Wes Goodson. 
Circa 1930. 



145 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"The depression lasted through the 1930s. No one can even 
imagine what the nation was really like, unless you were old 
enough to remember how hard it was. Every bank in the U.S. 
went bankrupt. There was absolutely no money or jobs to make 
a living for our families. 



Child, Amy M., in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 

Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929. 
Beginning of Great Depression. 

Created in 1935, the Works Progress 

Administration provided money 

to each state to create jobs. 




Elvin Wesley Goodson 
born July 3, 1930. 



"You could walk into a grocery store and just look at the food 
on the shelves, which was dirt cheap. For example, a can of 
pink salmon was 10 cents, a box of graham crackers was 
20 cents, and a dozen eggs was 5 cents. But you never had a 
penny in your pocket to buy anything. I really hope and pray we 
are not headed for the same thing again, the way our 
government has become so corrupt and full of hate and greed. 

"When President Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected, he created 
the Works Progress Administration. It absolutely kept us from 
starving to death. What a good man and president he was. I 
love him still. He died for our country with a brain hemorrhage. 
Our whole country was saddened by his sudden death. I do not 
believe our country will ever be the same. This dear man served 
as America's president for 16 years. Beat that!" 

Following their marriage, Amy and Wes traveled to Anaconda, 
Deer Lodge, Montana, where Wes worked. Amy remained 
there until she was eight months pregnant, then she boarded the 
train and made her way home to Tetonia, Idaho. Here she 
awaited the birth of her son. On July 3, 1930, Elvin Wesley was 
born in the living room of the building north of the cabin where 
several of his cousins were also born. His grandmother, Mary 
Madsen, assisted in the delivery. 

Amy and Wes later moved back to Tetonia and, when Bill and 
Mary Madsen moved to St. Anthony, Idaho, they lived in the 
family's cabin for a short time. When Amy was ready to deliver 
her second child and first little girl, she journeyed to 
St. Anthony and stayed with her mother in the rooms above the 
cafe she was operating. 



146 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



Amy Jeanice Goodson 
born December 14, 1931. 



Amy's daughter, Amy Jeanice, was born here on December 14, 
1 93 1 . Amy was just 1 9 years old at that time. 



Letter to Jon Hansen. 
(Child, Amy M., 1993) 



(Amy) "We lived in several dumps. It wasn't Wesley's fault. 
There just was no money, all the banks went bankrupt. I 
remember Wesley walked 10 miles to Ammon one day to work 
for his uncle. He worked all day and was payed with a big red 
rooster. We were so glad for it. That's just the way it was. 
Hard times." 



Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm 

Madsen 
died March 7, 1932. 




Amy Jeanice Goodson at 
about age three. 



Amy's father was not happy living in the "city" and moved back 
to the Basin with Stella and Orrin Douglass, who were living in 
the cabin at that time. On March 7, 1932, Amy's father passed 
away. There was a bitter blizzard raging in the Basin and those 
attending the funeral from out of town were forced to journey by 
train. 

Amy and Wes were divorced on March 25, 1935. Wes later 
married Ruby L. Davis and fathered 10 more children. 

Amy moved to Idaho Falls, Idaho. Her mother and two younger 
sisters also moved to Idaho Falls where Mary rented a small 
home on East College Street. 

AMY PEARL MADSEN AND EMMETT NOEL 
HUBBARD 



Amy Pearl Madsen and 

Emmett Noel Hubbard married 

April 22, 1935. 

Marriage record. 
(BYU Idaho, 2003) 



On April 22, 1935, Amy Pearl, who was then 22 years old, 
married Emmett Noel Hubbard at Logan, Cache County, Utah. 
Emmett was born February 9, 1905, at Centertown, Ohio 
County, Kentucky. Emmett's parents were David Milton and 
Florence Octavia Liesure Hubbard. He had one sister, Morba, 
and two brothers, Beckham H. and Hurchel T. 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003) 



(Connie) "Emmett came from a family of natural entertainers, 
some of whom went to Nashville, Tennessee, to perform in the 
music business." 



147 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Letter to Jon Hansen. 
(Child, Amy M., 1993) 




Shirley Jean and Bonnie Rae. 
Circa 1938. 

Shirley Jean Hubbard 
born January 6, 1936. 

Bonnie Ray Hubbard 
born August 3, 1937. 

Velna Syble Madsen Chinn 
died August 13, 1939. 



(Amy) "I thought I saw greener pastures in Emmett, so I 
divorced Wesley and married Emmett. He was a good person, 
likeable, and he could sing like a lark and dance. He was quite 
a bit older than me, but I loved him anyway. He was a good 
worker but times were still hard. Every night he would bring a 
sack of coal home on his back. He took it off the railroad cars 
each night after dark. I was so grateful for the coal." 

The couple settled into the small home located at 673 East 
College Street, Idaho Falls, Idaho. It was here two daughters 
were born to Amy and Emmett: Shirley Jean, born January 6, 
1936; and Bonnie Ray, born August 3, 1937. 

In August 1939, Amy's beloved little sister, Velna, complained 
of a stomach ache. She was treated with the usual home 
remedies, however, her condition worsened and, on August 12, 
the doctor was called to examine her. He determined that her 
appendix had ruptured and she was suffering from severe 
peritonitis poisoning. There was nothing he could do for her. 
Several of Velna's sisters were present, including Amy and 
Ruby and, upon hearing the news about their baby sister, they 
all began weeping and wailing. Mary Madsen was a much more 
stoic person and informed the girls they must get hold of 
themselves at once and be strong for their little sister. Velna 
suffered terrible pain and late the next day, on August 13, 1939, 
she passed away at her mother's home, where she and her little 
girl had been staying. 



Amy and her mother were very close and spent a great deal of 
time together. Mary kept a diary and recorded the following 
about the birth of Amy's fourth little daughter: 



1941 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 

Connie LaRaine Hubbard 
born January 14, 1941. 



(Mary) January 15, 1941, Wednesday: "Amy had a baby 
girl. " 

January 22, Wednesday: "Amy came home from the hospital 
today at noon in a taxi. She looks bad. Kids sure was glad to 



14X 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



see her. Elvin and Shirley slept with me tonight. Is snowing 
and melting.'" 

January 23, Thursday: "Nell came. She washed the baby. I 
took Shirley and Bonnie home and cooked dinner for Elvin, 
Shirley, and Bonnie. Amy's washer broke this morning. I don't 
like her girl (a young girl hired to help Amy during her 
recovery)." 

January 24, Friday: "Amy's girl got mad tonight. Nell went 
over to Amy 's, said she was going to get her another girl and 
she did. She got a girl from First Street." 







Connie LaRaine at about six months 
of age. Circa 1941. 



January 25, Saturday: "Bonnie stayed with me last night. The 
girl left early this morning. Never said a word when she left. 
Emmett went after the other girl. Sure is nice and sure cleaned 
Amy 's house nice. " 

February 1, Saturday: "I went over to Amy 's to take care of 
the babies while Amy went down town to see about her teeth. 
She has to go to Dr. Call for treatments first. Bonnie and 
Shirley are going to stay with me tonight. Elvin and Jeanice 
went to stay with Ida. " 

February 6, Thursday: "Elvin is sick tonight. Sore throat. " 

February 10, Monday: "Sure had a bad night. Elvin got a 
nose bleed so bad at 11 o 'clock. We did not get much sleep. I 
sure had to clean blood. Elvin was a lot better today. Got his 
clothes on at 11 o 'clock. Amy got her last treatment today but 
can 't open her mouth yet. " 



February 22, Saturday: "Amy sent after me to come over and 
spend the evening. I stayed till 11 o 'clock. Emmett is dragging 
the road. Got to work until 4 o 'clock in the morning. " 



149 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



March 15, Saturday: "Took care of the kids. Amy and 
Howard (Sortor) got their teeth pulled. Amy ate dinner over 
here when she got back." 




Velna Chinn holding Shirlene 
and Amy Hubbard holding Bonnie. 

Circa 1937. 



April 22, Tuesday: "/ took care of Amy's baby, Shirley, and 
Bonnie. Amy and Emmett drove their car for election. They 
made $11.00. Sure good." 

April 24, Thursday: ""Amy and I drove down to town with 
Emmett. Amy got $8.00 for driving the car on election. Amy got 
five little chickens and I got 31. Two of them are half dead. Mr. 
Lord plowed my garden this evening. I payed him a dollar. " 

April 25, Friday: "/ went for a ride with Amy and Emmett. We 
went to see the baby buffalo. " 

May 2, Friday: "Amy 's dog killed six of my little chickens 
today. " 



May 12, Monday: "Amy and I went to town this morning. 
Anyway, the wind is blowing." 

May 16, Friday: "Amy and the little kids went to the show." 

May 26, Monday: "It is still raining. Emmett fixed my roof 
Sure am glad. I painted my bedroom. I ate supper with Amy." 

June 10, Tuesday: "Amy got a fridge today on trial." 

June 29, Sunday: "Elvin came home last night. Went again up 
to Spencer. I picked the first raspberries. " 

July 4, Friday: "I went with Amy and Emmett to Heise Hot 
Springs. Had a good time. We ate our dinner in the shade, then 
Amy, Emmett, and the kids went swimming. Stayed in about two 
and one-half hours. Then we went to the tables and ate 
watermelon and lunch. We got home at 6 o 'clock. It rained on 
our way home. " 



150 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



July 13, Sunday: "1 stayed home all day. Not a soul was here 
all day. It was conference today. Amy, Emmett, and the kids 
went to Heise Hot Springs. " 

September 6, Saturday: "Amy came over this afternoon. She 
mopped the kitchen floor, then unpicked an old fur coat and 
washed it. I am going to make Jeanice a coat out of it. I went 
over to Amy 's a little while tonight. It rained all morning.''' 

September 8, Monday: "I made a coat for Jeanice. Fits good. 
Amy cleaned my front room this afternoon. " 

September 17, Wednesday: "Amy went to town again this 
morning. The kids stayed here. They ate dinner here today. 
Amy got some coal and groceries. I ate supper with Amy. She 
gave me a pan of hot rolls. Jeanice is sleeping with me 
tonight. " 

September 18, Thursday: "Elvin stayed with me last night." 

September 19, Friday: ""Elvin stayed here again tonight." 

September 22, Monday: ""Elvin brought a book home from the 
library. It was 'Smiling Hill Farm. ' I started to read it. It 
rained some today. " 

September 26, Friday: "1 did not do anything today. I did not 
feel so good so Amy and I went for a ride. We came by the 
underpass. That was fun. We went here and there and back 
again. Then we saw Emmett and Dick. We stopped. He gave 
Amy $10.00, so we went to town and got the two little girls cloth 
for a coat. " 



151 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



U.S. declared war on Japan 

December 8, 1941. 

Already at war with Germany. 

World War II. 



September 27, Saturday: "I sewed Shirley's coat today. It 
sure was a hard coat to sew. It had an Alaskan coat inside of 
it. 

September 29, Monday: "I sewed Bonnie a coat, and a dress 
for Jeanice. " 

September 30, Tuesday: "I sewed dresses for Jeanice, Shirley, 
and Bonnie. I am getting tired of sewing. Will quit for awhile. " 

October 2, Thursday: "Amy came over and woke me up at 
7:00 this morning. She wanted me to go with her to take 
Emmett to Pat Elmes' place to work. We came home and 
washed my clothes over to Amy 's. Amy came over and cleaned 
my house, then we went for a ride. We went up town, then out 
to the airport, then to the City Park, then home. When we got 
home, we saw we had aflat tire. Boy, did we work to get it off. 
We got it off. The tube was not hurt." 

October 3, Friday: "7 stayed with Amy all night." 

November 28, Friday: "I slept over to Amy 's last night. Amy 
sent a request in for me in Pocatello. The song was 'Build Me 
a Home. ' Sure was good. She sent one in for Emmett, too. It 
was 'The Crazy War. ' Amy and I went downtown. We ate at the 
5 cent spot. We had soup, hamburger, pie, and ice cream." 

Amy and Emmett were divorced on April 22, 1943. When the 
Judge declared the divorce granted, he asked Amy if she knew 
what day it was. "No, " she replied. It was her wedding 
anniversary. 

The Hubbard girls had no contact with Emmett until just prior 
to his death on September 29, 1973. He had been living in 
Indio, California. 



152 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Amy) "No-one can know how tragic it is to lose your best 
friend and mother. Mama lived just across the street from me 
and we were together every day. She was so good to me and my 
children. She stayed with the kids at night while I worked at the 
cafe. My shift was from 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m., and Mama 
came over every night before I left. I knew my children were 
being taken care of and I trusted my mother with everything. 



"On Saturday night, July 17, Mama worked with me at the cafe 
washing dishes. We came home in a taxi the next morning, and 
right after we got home, my sister and her husband (George and 
Nell Standen) came to get her. They were going to St. Anthony 
for the Madsen family reunion and then to Ponds Lodge Lake 
(now called Island Park Reservoir) to fish. That is the last time 
I saw Mama alive. 

"On Monday, I was sitting on the grass in the front yard 
watching the road to see if they were bringing Mama home. 
One of the children handed me the evening newspaper and there 
splashed across the front page was this terrible news about my 
family. Mama and Nell were gone. It couldn't be true. These 
things happened to others but not us. I was sure they would 
soon bring Mama home, but it was true. At first I couldn't even 
cry. One of the neighbors came and took me into the house. It 
was all so confusing and I was so distraught. 



Mary Hansen Madsen, Nellie Madsen 

Standen, Thelma Heath Standen, and 

Sandra Standen all 

died in a boating accident 

July 19, 1943. 

Conversations with Merry F. Shaw. 
(Freeman, Joy F., Various) 



(Joy) "Our family reunion was usually held close to my 
mother's (Lavina) birthday, which was July 18. We met at the 
park in St. Anthony. Uncle George and Aunt Nell Standon 
stayed the night with Mom and, in the morning, gathered their 
things and said they were going to drive up to Island Park 
Reservoir to go fishing. They allowed Doris to stay with Mom 
(Lavina). Grandma Madsen loved to fish and asked to go 
along. The boat developed a leak and slowly sank. George and 
Nell, their son Bill, his wife Thelma, and granddaughter, 
Sandra, were also in the boat when it went down. 



153 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"My grandmother died of a heart attack. The only ones to 
survive were Uncle George and Bill. It was really a tragic 
experience." 

"Elvin came home from work (he worked washing dishes in the 
daytime at the same cafe). He had already heard the bad news. 
He put his arms around my neck and said, 'Don 't cry, Mama. 
I will always take care of you. ' All I had left in the world were 
my five wonderful children." Elvin was only 13 years old. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M, 1971) 



Amy had been dating Melvin Larsen, who was a good friend of 
the family. (Amy) "He loved me and told me he wanted to take 
care of me and my kids for the rest of his life. " But the war was 
in full force and all able-bodied men were being called to fight. 
This included Mel, who was one of the first to be drafted. Amy 
saw Mel a few times after that when he returned home on 
furlough, and they continued to write for some time. He 
described the conditions on the front line fighting the Japanese: 
living in a fox hole and using his helmet for everything 
including eating, drinking, doing his laundry, and bathing. All 
of this with shells falling all around. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



But that was a world away and Amy was busy trying to provide 
for her five small children with no money, no food, major 
rationing, and no mother to help with the children. "Elvin had 
to care for the other four children " while Amy worked. "/ will 
be forever grateful to him for this." She worked four hours 
each night at a night club, then crossed the street to the New 
Club Cafe, where she worked from 10:00 p.m. until 6:00 a.m. 



One morning a man came to the counter and ordered a glass of 
buttermilk. He then asked Amy what time she got off work and 
offered to give her a ride home. This was how she met Harold 
Thomas Child. 

"On Christmas Eve 1943, Harold gave Amy a diamond ring and 
asked her to be his wife. She accepted the ring but later had 
misgivings and returned it. This upset Jeanice who had grown 



154 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



to love Harold. Upon seeing this, Amy took the ring back and 
they continued to date into Spring 1944. 

HAROLD THOMAS CHILD 



Heber Thomas Child. 
(Child, Amy M., 1997) 



Harold Thomas Child, was born October 17, 1915, to Heber 
Thomas and Minnie Bolander Accampo Child. 



Elvira Augusta Child 
born July 14, 1887. 

Julia Lunette Child 
born July 22, 1889. 

Heber Charles Child 
born April 4, 1892. 



Harold's father, Heber Thomas Child, was born May 29, 1865, 
in Riverdale, Utah, to Warren Gould Child and Hannah Austin 
Wilder. He was the sixth child of a family of 10. As Heber 
grew up, he worked in Ogden, Utah, in his father's grocery and 
dry goods store. From 1880 to 1883, he helped in building the 
Davis County Canal. Following the completion of this project, 
he got a job working for the street car company where he drove 
a span of mules. It was during this time he met and married 
Flora Wadsworth. They were married in the Logan Temple on 
February 17, 1886. The resided in Riverdale and it was here 
their first three children were born: Elvira Augusta, born 
July 14, 1887; Julia Lunette (Nettie), born July 22, 1889; and 
Heber Charles, born April 4, 1892. Heber worked for a time 
building the reform school in Ogden, which later was used as 
a school for the "deaf and dumb." 



Verna Mae Child 
born November 4, 1894. 

Warren Abiah Child 
born April 8, 1897. 

Minnie Ora Child 
born December 26, 1899. 

Warren Abiah Child 
died December 15, 1901. 



In Spring 1894, Heber and Flora moved their little family to 
Shelley, Idaho, where they rented a farm from John F. Shelley, 
after whom the town was named. On November 4, 1894, Flora 
gave birth to the first white child born in the town of Shelley, 
a little girl they named Verna Mae. On April 8, 1897, little 
Warren Abiah came to the family. He was followed by Minnie 
Ora, born on December 26, 1 899. While Warren was still very 
young, he contracted Bright's disease and became deathly ill. 
Heber spent many hours holding his little son and singing to 
him. Warren passed away in December 15, 1901. The song 
Heber sang for Warren was always one of his favorites. 



155 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



With all the sickness and death in the family, Heber was unable 
to pay the rent on the farm. Mr. Shelley gave him four lots and 
a two room house in consideration of the amount Heber had 
paid on the farm. He sold one corner to the Mountain State 
Implement Company and used the money to add two rooms to 
the little house. 

In 1902, Heber was elected the first Marshall of Shelley. 



Lila Child 

born July 5, 1902, 

died December 17, 1902. 

Flora Child 
born January 23, 1904, 
died January 25, 1904. 

Heber Charles Child 
died August 3, 1904. 



On July 5, 1902, baby Lila came to the family, but she died on 
December 17, 1902. She was followed by baby Flora on 
January 23, 1904, who survived only two days, dying on 
January 25, 1904. 

Heber and Flora's oldest son, Heber Charles, contracted 
typhoid fever and died August 3, 1904. This was the fourth 
child they had lost within three years. They were grief stricken. 



However, Heber needed to support his family and, in 1904, he 
was elected Constable of Shelley and, in 1915, was also elected 
to the position of Head Marshall. He held both positions 
simultaneously and wore two badges, one for each office. His 
work as Marshall and Constable was very dangerous and Heber 
had many close calls. 



Iva Deona Child 
born April 1, 1905. 

Flora Emily Wadsworth Child 
died December 8, 1905. 



On April 1, 1905, Flora gave birth to another daughter, Iva 
Deona. On December 8, 1905, when little Iva was only eight 
months old, her mother died. This left Heber with five children 
ranging in age from 18 to 8 months. The older girls may have 
left home or married by this time, and Heber was left to care for 
the three youngest girls. 



Heber was working nights at the old mill. He took his three 
girls to work with him, fixing cots on which they could sleep. 
The girls played on the sacks of grain until it was time for bed. 
They prayed each night for the safety of their beloved Pappa as 
he cleaned the weeds and debris from the mill race. 



156 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



Heber Thomas Child and 
Anne Tomine Bolander Accampo 
married January 6, 1909. 



Julia Lunette Child 
died July 23, 1910. 



On January 6, 1909, Heber married Anne Tomine (Minnie) 
Bolander Accampo in the Logan Temple. Minnie had four 
children from a previous marriage: Andrew, born 
December 21, 1899, and died December 22, 1899; John, born 
March 3, 1901; Albert, born September 2, 1903; and Beatrice 
(no birth date available). On April 8, 1910, Minnie's little 
Andrew contracted scarlet fever and died. On July 23, 1910, 
Heber's married daughter, Julia Lunette (Nettie), died in 
childbirth. The baby died three weeks later. She left behind 
her husband and a 20-month old daughter. 



Dora Child 
born October 2, 1909. 

Evelyn Child 
born October 6, 1911. 

Iva Deona Child 
died January 20, 1912. 



Juanita Child 
born October 5, 1913. 

Harold Thomas Child 
born October 17, 1915 

Anne Tomine Child 
died September 16, 1951. 



Heber and Minnie added two more daughters to the family: 
Dora, born October 2, 1909; and Evelyn, born October 6, 1911. 

Early the next year, on January 20, 1912, Heber's youngest 
daughter, seven year old Iva, was struck and killed by a train as 
she was crossing the tracks on her way home from school. It 
was Heber's duty as Marshall to investigate all accidents, but 
not until he arrived at the scene of the accident did he realize it 
was his own little girl who was killed. 

The family grew by two more children: Juanita, born 
October 5, 1913; and Harold Thomas, born October 17, 1915. 

Heber's second wife, Minnie, suffered failing health for a 
number of years before her death on September 16, 1951. 
Heber had provided untiring care for her even though he was in 
his late 80s. 






£0 



I 





Heber was a well-known figure on the streets of Shelley, and 
instrumental in promoting "Spud Days." 

Harold grew up in Shelley, Idaho, where he graduated from 
high school. Because of a birth defect, he was ineligible for the 
draft and could not serve in the war effort. 



157 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



AMY PEARL MADSEN AND HAROLD THOMAS 
CHILD 



E-mail message. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003) 



(Connie) "During the time Mom and Harold were dating, I 
called him Uncle Harold. I recall my mother asking me if she 
could marry Uncle Harold. I was just three years old, but I 
remember thinking about it a minute and asking, 'Will you 
bring me something home? ' She smiled and said 'YesV I said, 
'Okay, you can marry him. ' Recalling this brings a smile to my 
lips. They traveled to Dillon, Montana, where they were 
married. Harold was very good to me. He was a good man, 
and I loved him dearly." 



Amy Pearl married Harold Thomas 
Child March 22, 1944. 

Germany surrendered 
May 6, 1945. 

Japan surrendered 
August 6, 1945. 



On March 22, 1944, Amy Pearl married Harold Thomas Child 
at Dillon, Montana. They made their home in Shelley, Idaho. 
Harold worked at Bellville's Machine Company and ran a small 
farm at Goshen. Here he and Amy milked cows, raised pigs, 
sheep, horses, chickens, ducks, and turkeys, and a huge garden. 
Amy canned vegetables and fruits all summer. (Amy) "I 
always stored food for a rainy day. I could always go to my 
cupboard and fix something to eat. I saved all my dry bread for 
puddings.'''' 



Harold Terry Child 
horn August 22, 1946. 



They also took many camping and picnic trips to such places as 
Wolverine Canyon, Horseshoe Canyon and Yellowstone Park. 
When they went on a picnic, the food came from the cupboard 
and, on camping trips, they took the blankets and pillows from 
their beds. No sleeping bags for these trips! 

On August 22, 1946, a son was born to the couple, whom they 
named Harold Terry. He shares initials with his father and 
grandfather. 

Following the example set by her mother, Amy's sister, Lavina, 
recorded some of her memories in diaries. Included are some 
which reflect her love and interest in her sister Amy and other 
family members. 



158 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1947-1951) 



(Lavina) May 30, 1947, Friday: "We went to the cemetery 
here then to Idaho Falls, and then to St. Anthony. Bud and 
family, Joy and family. Then we went up to the Basin. Amy 
and all, Ruby and all, and Johnnie and all with Stella 's family 
all had a picnic. It rained so we all ate over to Stella 's. " 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1953-1957) 



February 12, 1953, Thursday: "Spent the day out to Amy 's. 

We went to see 'The Robe. ' Is windy but not too cold. " 

June 20, 1954, Sunday: "Had a family reunion in Teton 
Canyon today. All were there. Maxine and family too. Was a 
nice day. " 



Heber Thomas Child. 
(Child, Amy M., 1997) 

Heber Thomas Child 
died January 30, 1957. 



On May 29, 1955, an open house was held to observe Harold's 
father's 90th birthday; 1 12 people were in attendance. It was 
a joyous occasion. Not long afterward, it became necessary for 
Heber to move to Burley to live with his daughter, Minnie, and 
her husband. He died on January 30, 1957, at the age of 91. 



>- 
a. 

i 



On the 8 1 st anniversary of their mother Mary's birthday, several 
of the sisters and two granddaughters met at the Idaho Falls 
Temple and participated in temple work for their mother and 
deceased sisters. Lavina recorded this and other visits in her 
diaries. 



> 

< 




Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1953-1957) 



(Lavina) May 10, 1957, Friday: "Anna, Stell, Amy, Ilene, 
Geneal, and I went through the temple. " 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1963-1967) 



July 7, 1963, Sunday: "Left here at 9:00 a.m. Got up to 
Tetonia Cemetery at 11:15. Johnnie, Amy and Harold, Joy and 
Lynn and kids, Bud and Merlyn and kids, Anna, Hazel and Judy 
and kids met us there. We went to Teton Canyon for reunion. 
Stella and Orrin met us there. " 



Anna Christina Madsen Thorsted 
died September 11, 1969. 



June 25, 1966, Saturday: "Froze our garden bad again last 
night. We left with Harold and Amy at 10:00 a.m. Went to 



159 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Yellowstone, drove over to Virginia City. Went to the show. 
Stayed all night. 



n 




Harold Terry Child, age three. 



June 26, Sunday: "Got up. Ate breakfast. Walked around the 
town. Drove down to Ashton, Lamont, and Tetonia. Stopped 
at Johnnie 's. Went over to Vernice 's and saw some slides. Ate 
dinner at Victor with Johnnie. Came home. " 

July 10, Sunday: "Had all my sisters and Johnnie here to 
dinner. Had Joy, Lynn, Tracy, D.L. and Jalene, too. We went 
up to Amy 's at night to see some movies. " 

January 29, 1972, Saturday: "Went up to Amy and Harold 's 
to a dinner party. Drove home afterwards. Is 6 below today." 

July 31, 1972, Monday: "Went up to Amy and Harold's for 
supper. Elvin, Betty and family were there. Mike home on 
furlough. " 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 

Johnnie William Madsen 
died September 3, 1972. 



(Amy) "On Saturday, September 2, 1972, Harold and I spent 
the day with my beloved brother, Johnnie. On Sunday when I 
received the call that he had died, I cannot describe the grief I 
felt. Harold was at work and, when I heard him drive in, I ran 
out to meet him, threw myself in his arms and sobbed. Once I 
could tell him what was wrong, Harold sobbed along with me. 
Johnnie was truly dear to us. The first things I noticed, when 
I saw him in his casket, were his strong, beautiful hands." 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003) 



(Connie) "Mom loved to take pictures and have pictures taken 
of her. She was a brilliant person who never stopped learning 
and dreaming. She loved family parties and remembering the 
happy times. She was also an immaculate housekeeper and was 
always busy cleaning. Even when she became older and was in 
failing health, you could find her crawling around on her 
stomach cleaning so no one would see any dirt in her house." 



60 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



Amy was mentioned on several occasions in the diaries kept by 
her sister, Lavina. 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1979-1983) 



(Lavina) August 4, 1981, Tuesday: "Went up to Stell and 
Orrin 's with Harold and Amy. Stell cooked a birthday dinner 
for Amy. " 



March 22, 1982. "/ went up to Amy and Harold's for family 
home evening. Elvin and Betty, Dewane and Jeanice, Larry, 
Geneal and boys, and llene and Sherm were there. I stayed all 
night. " 



September 9, 1982, Thursday: "Amy and Harold came and 
spent the evening. I showed her how to start an afghan. " 

December 15, 1982, Wednesday: "Amy and I fixed lunch up 
to her place for Stella, Orrin, and llene. Harold came and took 
me up there. Came back with llene and Stell. " 



< 

to 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003) 



July 2, 1983, Saturday: "Amy came and we went to lunch." 

(Connie) u My mom owned a number of wigs and never went 
out without one on her head. On one occasion, she was riding 
horses in the canyons west of Tetonia with Uncle Johnnie when 
her wig got caught on a branch. She looked back and there was 
her red wig swinging from a tree limb. 



Q 

> 
< 





Harold Thomas Child died 
November 14, 1984. 



John Wesley Goodson 
died in March 1987. 



"Mom's health began failing as she reached her mid-80s, and 
she found it necessary to move to Provo, Utah, to live with 
Bonnie. One day in about 1983, Mom and Bonnie were out 
running errands when they were rear-ended by another driver. 
Mom jumped out of the car and was running around excitedly 
talking to the police, the faulty driver, and my sister, and didn't 
realize her wig had come off in the car when they were hit. She 
was mortified to learn she had been without it." 



161 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Letter to Connie Martin. 
(Child. Amy M., 1988) 



(Amy) "I wanted to tell you how close Jon and I came to being 
hit by lightning. We had gone for Haley's wedding and then 
attended a recital for Bob's granddaughter, Krista, Julie's girl. 
We were driving back to Bonnie's and stopped for gas. There 
developed a terrible lightning storm all over Provo. It was 
striking around us, one after another. When we pulled out of 
the service station, Bonnie's car was just three cars ahead of us, 
and we were all stopped at a red light. Suddenly, a big bolt of 
lightning came and hit a steel light pole only about seven or 
eight feet from our pickup. We both ducked, especially me. 




Lavina Whyte and Amy Child. 



Lavina Marie Madsen Whyte 
died February 4, 1991. 



"It was terrible. The fire of it ran along the wires and sprayed 
sparks all over, then the noise from the thunder was just 
deafening. When Jon and I got home, Bonnie grabbed my hand 
and we ran for the door when another big bolt came. I 
stumbled and fell almost on my head into the house, then 
another one came and I crawled into the kitchen, Bonnie was 
right behind me. May brought my purse in the house. It flew 
out somewhere. I didn't particularly care about my purse at 
that particular time. Ammon said the reason the lightning 
didn't hit us was because of the rubber tires on the pickup. I 
don't know, it was just too close to be comfortable. My heart 
beat so fast after that, all night." 

"My two sweet daughters, Connie LaRaine and Bonnie Rae, 
gave a party in my honor on August 2, 1993. Connie had the 
party at her home and invited all my family home evening 
group and many members of my family. There was lots of 
singing and it was so fun. They sang many of my favorite 
songs. Bonnie and Connie have such beautiful voices. They 
got their talent from their dad. Well, I used to be able to sing 
as well. I also play piano and organ. 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Marlene) "When Mel Larsen died, Aunt Amy was living with 
her son, Terry, in Portland, Oregon, so she and I decided to take 
the train to Pocatello. We got on the train at 10:00 a.m. and 
didn't get into Pocatello until 3:00 a.m. We sat right across the 
isle from two young men who smoked up a storm. They were 



162 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
died September 10, 1998. 



Stella Rose Madsen Douglass 
died November 11,2000. 



very nice to us and, whenever they went to the next car, they 
brought us back cokes and stuff, but we nearly choked on the 
smoke. When we got off the train in Pocatello, our luggage 
didn't get off with us. I wanted to fall through the floor. All 
my medications were packed in those suitcases and I needed 
that medication. And Aunt Amy had all her clothes and stuff 
in her luggage as well. One of the women who worked for the 
railroad said she would find our luggage so we drove to our 
place in Chubbuck and waited. She chased that train all the 
way to Camas before she caught up with it but she brought our 
luggage to us. She didn't get back until 6:00 p.m. Overall, it 
was a fun experience but I'd never do it again." 



Sacrament Meeting Talk. 
(Child, Amy M., 1995) 



For Grandma Amy Pearl. 
(Bird, Lori H., 2004) 



(Amy) "I am living here at the Valley Care Center because I 
had a bad accident about two months ago. I had second- and 
third-degree burns on my arm and hand, which required skin 
grafts and a one-month stay in the hospital. I am so thankful 
for this wonderful place to come and convalesce and for the 
lovely people who work here." 



>■ 

a. 

i 




Amy Pearl Child. Circa 1945. 



(Lori Gay) "I remember my grandma as a hard-working, 
industrious lady. Grandma was tough and would often do the 
hardest task because she knew how and that she could get the 
job done. She loved to camp and ride horses and her three- 
wheeler in Horseshoe Canyon. 

"My grandma also liked to look nice and made herself up every 
day with makeup. Her hair was always done, too. She liked 
pretty clothes and shoes and, if the clothes weren't pretty 
enough, she would add this sequined edge or that crocheted 
hem to dress it up a bit. Grandma Amy was very accomplished 
at crocheting and made each of her grandchildren many nice 
throws, dolls with crocheted dresses, and crocheted dresses for 
our children. She made my daughter, Cassandra, a beautiful 
white dress and sent it to her on her eighth birthday for her 
baptism. 



> 
< 




163 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Life Sketch of Amy Pearl Madsen Child. 
(Martin, Connie, H., 2002) 



"She never missed a birthday and often sent homemade books 
with stickers, pictures, and something written on each page. It 
must have taken her hours to write. When I visited her, she was 
always spunky, even when she didn't feel well. When it was 
time for my visit to end, she always said, 7 love ya, Lolly. ' 
And I knew she truly did." 

(Connie) "Amy Pearl loved the name her mother chose 
especially for her. She sincerely loved, honored, and 
reverenced Gramma Mary and extolled her virtues. 

"Amy Pearl is the mother of six children, grandmother of 29, 
great-grandmother of 87, and great-great-grandmother of 16. 
Our mother taught her children the meaning of work by precept 
and example. 

"Amy Pearl was an avid lover and admirer of nature. In a 
special conversation I had with her several years ago, she 
shared with me her sentiments of God's creations. 7 love to be 
in the pine trees, among the colorful and varied wild flowers 
and singing birds. I love the sunshine. I thank Heavenly 
Father for the sunshine. ' At this point in our conversation she 
began singing, 'There is Sunshine in My Soul Today.'' Mother 
went on to say she loved to plant, water, and weed her flowers. 
She loved sunsets. And she loved all of Jesus Christ's 
creations, for which she daily thanked Heavenly Father. She 
bore her testimony, 7 have much faith in the power of the 
priesthood. I know Jesus Christ lives. ' 

"As I reflect upon her testimony and her faith, I am keenly 
reminded of my sister, Shirley's, near death experience as a tot 
not quite two years old. Shirley suddenly became very ill. Dr. 
West [was called in and] covered her face with a white sheet. 
Our mother ran outside and knelt in the snow in prayer. She 
was obedient to the prompting of the Holy Ghost and 
summoned the Elders, who administered to Shirley. In a few 
hours, Shirley opened her eyes and said to her vigilant parents, 



164 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 



'///'/' Dr. West emphatically acknowledged that a miracle had 
been wrought that evening. 



(Doctrine & Covenants 
Chapter 42, Verse 48) 



"Amy Pearl frequently referred to Shirley as her miracle baby. 
'And again, it shall come to pass that he that hath faith in me 
to be healed, and is not appointed unto death, shall be healed. ' 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard 
Child died July 19, 2002. 



"Amy Pearl enjoyed many celebrations and activities with her 
friends and family members. She enjoyed singing, playing the 
piano and organ, and her various church stewardships. It is 
pleasing to me to sing for our mother for the last time one of 
her favorite songs, 'Sunshine on my Shoulders,' written and 
performed by her favorite musical artist, John Denver. 

"Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child left her earthly 
home on July 19, 2002, the death date of her beloved mother 59 
years earlier. She died on an early summer morning drenched 
in sunshine. Amy was just a few days short of her 90th 
birthday." 



> 
a. 



o 



Obituary for John Wesley Goodson. 
(Jarvis, Dolores R., 1987) 



"Mourn not the dead who calmly lie 
by God's own hand composed to rest; 
For, hark! A voice from yonder sky 
Proclaims them blest — supremely blest. 
With them the toil and strife are o'er; 



> 
< 




Their labors end, their sorrows cease; 
For they have gained the blissful shore 
Where dwell serene eternal peace." 



Child, Amy M, in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Amy) "I feel so honored to be the mother of these six children. 
I love my kids. I always did, right from the time they were 
born. I have good kids. I think we are a great family. I can't 
think of one of them that I would give away. Ha! Ha! I think 
I will keep them all. All my kids love the Savior of this world, 
Jesus Christ. They have been good to me." 



165 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"Elvin Wesley is brave, dependable, and stern. Elvin was a 
special comfort to me when I lost my dear mother so suddenly 
in a boating accident. I remember him putting his arms around 
me and saying, 'Don 't cry Mama, I will always take care of 
you. ' This helped me so much at this tragic time in my life. 




Amy Pearl Madsen and 
Harold Child. 



"Amy Jeanice has always been understanding about illness, 
friendly, and has a pretty smile. She always told me I was her 
very best friend. She helped so much with the work at home, 
in the field, or cleaning house. She was always jovial and good 
natured. 

"Shirley Jean is kind, clean with her home, lovely, and serious. 
Shirley was always very helpful even though her health was 
never that good. She had a lot of nervous trouble, but she was 
always helpful and did the best she could. 

"Bonnie Rae's qualities include serving, giving, and going the 
extra mile for others. Bonnie was a very talented girl. She 
could learn so easily. She helped with the animals, like milking 
the cows. She was popular in school. 

"Connie LaRaine has always been willing, kind, very 
charitable, performed service to others, and loves animals. As 
a child, she was always kind, willing, obedient, and quiet. She 
asked for nothing. She was so ill a lot, but this didn't make her 
unwilling to serve and do things for her family. She was very 
attached to our animals, and was good to all of them. 



"Harold Terry was our baby. He is loving, kind, polite, 
obedient, and has a cute personality. He brought us much joy 
from the time he was born. He was very athletic in high school. 
He has a beautiful smile and is pleasant and good natured. 



66 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 




Amy Pearl Madsen attended the two-room school 
at Cache. Her fifth grade picture is shown above. 
Back row, L to R: Sammie Gasser, Marion Gale, 
Leslie Hall, Ralph Moffat, Talmage Mickelsen, and 
Clyde Higley. Front row, L to R: Gweneth Rudd, 
Sibil Leatham, and Amy Pearl Madsen. Amy did 
not identify one of the girls in her class. The 
teacher was Douglas Sorenson. Circa 1924-25. 
Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



Amy Pearl (left) loved to dress up and have fun. 
She also loved having her picture taken. Circa 
1936. Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 






v f 




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167 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



". 



tftMmi&t ** * * * * **** ********* 



LU-yPV^). 





Elvin Wesley Goodson (above) at age 
five or six. Circa 1935. Courtesy 
Bonnie Rae Hansen. 
Amy Jeanice Goodson (above) at 




» SHWlliBMT "i.T7tle a.mv jlanice! 

about age three. Circa 1935. 
Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



John Wesley Goodson and Amy Madsen (above) in about 
1929. Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



lf)K 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 




Emmett Noel Hubbard (left) was born in 1905, in 
Centertown, Ohio County, Kentucky. Circa 1932. 
Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



Emmett's parents (below, back row center) were 
Florence Octavia Liesure and David Milton Hubbard. 
Emmett (below, front row, far right) is probably the 
youngest of the family. Circa 1908. Courtesy Bonnie 
Rae Hansen. 



169 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 





tff%. 




■ 




Emmett Noel Hubbard 
and Amy Pearl Madsen 
were married April 22, 
1935. Both of the 
above pictures are 
labeled 'wedding 
picture.' Courtesy 
Bonnie Rae Hansen 
and Connie LaRaine 
Martin. 

The couple's three 
daughters are shown at 
left, L to R: Shirley 
Jean, Bonnie Rae, and 
Connie LaRaine. 
Circa 1943. Courtesy 
Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



70 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 




Harold Thomas Child and Amy Pearl 
Madsen were married at Dillon, 
Montana, on March 22, 1944 (above 
right). This photo was taken in about 
1970. Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



Harold's father, Heber Thomas Child, was an early settler of 
Shelley, Idaho, and served as Constable, Head Marshall (upper 
left), and volunteer fireman (center left), as well as Mayor of the 
small town. Circa 1950. Courtesy Terry Child. 

Harold and Amy added a son to the family, her sixth child and his 
first, Harold Terry Child. Shown at bottom right is Amy with 
Terry Child at about age one year. Circa 1947. Courtesy Terry 
Child. 




171 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




From the above picture, it would appear at least three of the Madsen sisters met in mid- to late 
summer 1942, for a visit and then took a picture of their children. Those shown here are, back row, 
L to R: Dale Sortor, Ilene Douglass, an unidentified girl, LaVerl Sortor, Geneal Douglass, Delmer 
Sortor, and Elvin Goodson. Front row, L to R: Wanda Sortor, Shirley Jean Hubbard, Marlene 
Sortor holding onto Connie LaRaine Hubbard, Bonnie Rae Hubbard, and Beverly Sortor. Circa 
1942. Courtesy Merry F. Shaw. 



172 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 




■' ■■->!' :*£:' 



The photo above is a composite picture of the children of Amy Pearl Madsen Child. Left to right, 
back row: Elvin Wesley, Shirley Jean, Amy Jeanice, and Bonnie 
Rae. Front row, left to right: Connie LaRaine and Harold Terry. 
Circa 1946. Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 

Johnnie, Amy, and Ruby (below left, L to R) often returned to 
the canyons they loved 
in the Basin. Circa 
1970. Courtesy Bonnie 
Rae Hansen. 

Ruby and Amy (far 
right, L to R) enjoy a 
mountain visit or 
camping trip. Circa 
1980s. Courtesy Bonnie 
Rae Hansen. 



> 
< 





173 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 





Amy Pearl (above 
left) with her four 
daughters: Amy 
Jeanice, Shirley 
Jean, Bonnie Rae, 
and Connie 
LaRaine. Circa 
1992. Courtesy 
Bonnie Rae 
Hansen. 



PRC >tah- 

'CJiitA Prer* 

lame- M Ml dau^h; 
iofii Oct. n. 
191$, in Shelley 
10 fi&hsi "Oioroas- 

«§. act M i n ri t <£ 
&0Jander Child'. 
lie wM massed at 

uAwd "from Shri- 
lr> H ™ot 

in 1934. lie ifi-yf' 
frsjJ Amy Mad* 
sstt Mijrcn ~ 2, 
1 944," in. DilloD, 

McHSt 

Hc : ws a wcidi 
ycars ami f 




TOVO* 




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Hi farmed ro tit« Crosfc , 
ay vearv'H* sfe worked 
e of Idaho fbr several yesf •• 
■asan a£pvt -member of 1 

iv<j« include tils .'-'wife of Rf!% 
is, iS.viw W>:Ck»dsQft^ :; Firth 
ir did TV Ciilii 6T Pw33iiii; 



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Fifth- Shirley J. H-wCr*^ of H; 

and * Coji n ifr 1-- Martin of Pi 
Afiz. etiree sisters, Bc£ 
Orenrf, ilia!?, .lussila ': 
-AfeieiicaB lnij!§ {ird Dot 
^ctf'JLux>frlft, Calif.: 29 gftn 

*3? F? i"? 7 %f £JTT*>*S& I — liT 3 f^ 1*1 i"" 1 1% J ¥11 ?**?* Tl s 

*M.s>* .-**> -■ s -' '- r"r' ;i * ' ■ ' — * ' * * '-* 3 *~ ' - • 

Fiiner&l services wrl I fe ' t»li 
'jp.'ni:., 'Siiliriiajj; in-, the Frifp 
Ward claprf with ptmidemlW 
Med ait: officialing. I ■ • w 

at the' eb#4is Satur&av Hiutf 1 
fj^wcre matte ' fty Walker Mortuary 

fcPrOVG, 

■ :*3 . - 




Harold Thomas Child and Amy Pearl (left) in the 
1970s. Courtesy Terry Child. 

Obituary for Harold Thomas Child (above right) who 
passed away November 4, 1984, in Provo, Utah. 
Courtesy Connie LaRaine Martin. 



174 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 




> 

< 

2 



In November 1984, Amy Pearl's children and grandchildren gathered following the funeral for 
Harold Child. Pictured above, back row, L to R: Harold Terry, Bonnie Rae, and Elvin Wesley. 
Seated, L to R: Shirley Jean, Amy Jeanice, Connie LaRaine, and Amy Pearl. Circa 1984. Courtesy 
Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



175 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Amy Pearl posed with her 
older grandchildren following 
the funeral services for 
Harold Child. Back row, 
L to R: Randy Dye, Amy 
Child, Mike Goodson, Dennis 
Dye, Deanna Goodson, 
Sheryl Dye, Linda Goodson, 
Stephen Goodson. Center: 
Kelly Hansen. Front row, 
L to R: Haley Hansen, 
Kristen Child, Susan Burris, 
Lizi Hansen, and Karen 
Goodson. Center front: 
Starlee Hansen. 



Amy Pearl is shown with all 
of her younger grand-children 
and great-grandchildren. 
Individual names were not 
available. 

Both pictures taken in 
November 1984. Courtesy 
Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



76 



Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson Hubbard Child 




> 

< 

2 



Amy Pearl (above) with her six children at her 80 th birthday party. Shown L to R: Elvin Wesley, 
Amy Jeanice, Shirley Jean, Bonnie Rae, Connie LaRaine, Harold Terry, and Amy Pearl. Circa 
1992. Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



77 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



In Loving Memory 
Of 




August 4, 1912 ~ July 19, 2002 



PALLBEARERS 

Mike Goodson Dennis Dye 

Eric Hunter Craig Burns 

Kelley Hansen Steve Goodson Shawn Child 

Honorary Pallbearers 

Grandsons and Great Grandsons 



Firth Stake Center 

11:00 A.M. Wednesday July 24, 2002 

Bishop Kim Leavitt, Conducting 

Family Prayer H. Terry Child 

Prelude & Postlude Marilyn Fielding 

Invocation Eugene Dye 

Life Sketch & Song Connie Martin 

Memories of Grandma Amy Lori Bird 

Linda Hunter 

Vocal Solo "Wind Beneath My Wings" 

Nathan Buck Accompanied by Mandy Buck 

Speaker Jonathan Hansen 

Vocal Duet "How Great Thou Art" 

Dewane Dye and Julie Wareing 
Accompanied by Connie Dye 

Speaker Bishop Maurice Backlund 

Musical Selection "God Be With Yoa Till We Meet Again" 

Bonnie Hansen, Lori Bird, Haley Peacock 

Starlee Ley, and Amy Lizi Matthews 

Accompanied by Debbie Kaye West 

Remarks Bishop Kim Leavitt 

Chorus "I Am A Child Of God" 

Grandchildren and Great Grandchildren 

Benediction Gary Hansen 

Interment Hillcrest Cemetery 

Dedicatory Prayer Elvin W. Goodson 



Funeral services (program above) for Amy Pearl Madsen were held at the Firth Stake Center in July 
2002. Amy Pearl loved riding (below) in the mountains around Teton Basin. Circa 1970s. 
Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 




7X 



Chapter 8 
ELVIN WESLEY GOODSON 

AND 
BETTY JUNE WALKER 




Elvin Wesley Goodson and Betty June Walker. 



Information for this chapter provided 

by Connie LaRaine Martin 

and Bonnie Rae Hansen. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Born: 
Died: 


Amy Pearl Madsen 

4 Aug 1912, Cache, Fremont, Idaho 
19 Jul 2002, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 




V 



Married: John Wesley Goodson 

Born: 1 Nov 1910, Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Died: _ Mar 1987, Arco, Butte, Idaho 



Elvin Wesley Goodson 

Born: 3 Jul 1930, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Betty June Walker 

Born: 29 Jul 1933, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Michael Elvin Goodson 

Born: 13 June 1953, Aurora, Arapahoe, Colorado 
Died: Living 



Linda Pearl Goodson 

Born: 28 Dec 1954, Aurora, Arapahoe, Colorado 
Died: Living 



Stephen Ray Goodson 

Born: 16 Sep 1956, Aurora, Arapahoe, Colorado 
Died: Living 



Deanna Gay Goodson 

Born: 15 Mar 1960, Mountain Home, Elmore, Idah 
Died: Living 



David Bert Goodson 

Born: 28 May 1961, Mountain Home, Elmore, Ida! 
Died: Living 



Karen Lee Goodson 

Born: 16 Oct 1962, Mountain Home, Elmore, Idahi 
Died: Living 



Elvin Wesley Goodson (Child) and Betty June Walker 



ELVIN WESLEY GOODSON (CHILD) 



1930 



Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929. 
Beginning of Great Depression. 

Elvin Wesley Goodson 
born July 3, 1930. 

Amy Jeanice Goodson 
born December 14, 1931. 



t£f^W^TWTi'\ 




Elvin at about age five (above) 
and six (below). 




Following their marriage, Amy Pearl Madsen and John Wesley 
Goodson moved to Anaconda, Montana, where Wes probably 
worked at the mines. 

About a month before Elvin was due to be born, his mother 
boarded the train and returned to Tetonia, Teton Valley, Idaho, 
to be with her mother. Elvin was born on July 3, 1930, at the 
homestead, which belonged to his grand-parents, Bill and Mary 
Madsen. 

The effects of the stock market crash of October 1929, were felt 
everywhere; there was no work, no money, and no way to buy 
food and other necessities. 

In the early 1 930s, Elvin's grandparents, Bill and Mary Madsen, 
moved to St. Anthony, Idaho, where Bill worked part time at the 
seed house and Mary opened a small cafe. When Amy's next 
baby was due, she again went to stay with her mother. Elvin's 
sister, Amy Jeanice, was born on December 14, 1931, in the 
small rooms above the cafe owned by her grandmother. 

Elvin's grandfather passed away on March 7, 1932. Sometime 
following the death of her husband, Mary Madsen moved to 
Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

When Elvin was four years old, his mother, who was 22 at that 
time, filed for divorce from Wes; the divorce was granted on 
March 25, 1935. Wes later married Ruby L. Davis and Elvin 
has 10 brothers and sisters from that marriage. 

On April 22, 1935, Amy married Emmett Noel Hubbard. The 
family lived in a small house at 673 College Street, in Idaho 
Falls, located just across the street from the home of Elvin's 
grandmother, Mary Madsen. 



1 2 
> x 

3 c 



181 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Shirley Jean Hubbard 
born January 6, 1936. 

Bonnie Rae Hubbard 
born August 3, 1937. 

Connie LaRaine Hubbard 
born January 14, 1941. 

Bonnie Rae. 
(Child, Amy M, 1960) 



Over the next five years, three little sisters were added to the 
family: Shirley Jean, born January 6, 1936; Bonnie Rae, born 
August 3,1937; and Connie LaRaine, born January 14, 1941. 

(Amy) "Elvin was kind of my little soldier. I could always trust 
him to take care of the younger children. I was among the 
flowers listening to a sweet bird when suddenly I felt a sharp 
pain and I knew my baby, Bonnie Rae, was on the way. My 
little son, Elvin, was playing outside in the sand. I called to 
Elvin and asked him to run to Stibbs store (that was a long way 
for a little boy to go alone) and call his grandmother to come 
home. She was working for the WPA in downtown Idaho Falls 
at that time. Even though Elvin was only seven years old, he 
handled this request in the grown up way he handled everything 
in his life." 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 




Elvin Wesley, Shirley Jean, and 
Amy Jeanice. Circa 1937. 



Elvin was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints on January 28, 1939. 

During at least 1941, Elvin's grandmother kept a diary, which 
reflects the love and care she provided her grandchildren: 

(Mary) January 22, 1941, Wednesday: "Amy came home from 
the hospital today at noon in a taxi. She looks bad. Kids sure 
was glad to see her. Elvin and Shirley slept with me tonight. Is 
snowing and melting." This was recorded following the birth of 
Connie LaRaine Hubbard. 

February 1, Saturday: "Bonnie and Shirley are going to stay 
with me tonight. Elvin and Jeanice went to stay with Ida. " 

February 6, Thursday: "Elvin is sick tonight. Sore throat. " 

February 10, Monday: "Sure had a bad night. Elvin got a 
nose bleed so bad at II o 'clock. We did not get much sleep. I 
sure had to clean blood. Elvin was a lot better today. Got his 
clothes on at II o 'clock. 



1X2 



Elvin Wesley Goodson (Child) and Betty June Walker 



June 29, Sunday: "Elvin came home last night. Went again up 
to Spencer. 

September 18, Thursday: "Elvin stayed with me last night." 

September 19, Friday: "Elvin stayed here again tonight.'" 

September 22, Monday: "Elvin brought a book home from the 
library. It was 'Smiling Hill Farm. ' I started to read it. It 
rained some today. " 



U.S. at war with Japan and Germany, 

World War II. 



On April 22, 1943, when Elvin was 13 years old, Amy and 
Emmett were divorced. Amy worked at a night club from 
6:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m., then walked across the street to the 
New Club Cafe where she worked from 10:00 p.m. until 
6:00 a.m. 



t 



Mary Hansen Madsen, Nellie Madsen 

Standen, Thelma Heath Standen, and 

Sandra Standen all 

died in a boating accident 

July 19, 1943. 

Conversations with Merry F. Shaw. 
(Freeman, Joy F., Various) 



(Joy) "Our family reunion was usually held close to my 
mother's (Lavina) birthday, which was July 18. We met at the 
park in St. Anthony. Uncle George and Aunt Nell Standon 
stayed the night with Mom and, in the morning, gathered their 
things and said they were going to drive up to Island Park 
Reservoir to go fishing. They allowed Doris to stay with Mom. 
Grandma Madsen loved to fish and asked to go along. The boat 
developed a leak and slowly sank. George and Nell, their son 
Bill, his wife Thelma, and granddaughter, Sandra, were also in 
the boat when it went down. My grandmother died of a heart 
attack. The only ones to survive were Uncle George and Bill. 
It was really a tragic experience." 



> 

3 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Amy) "Elvin came home from work (he worked washing dishes 
in the daytime at the same cafe where I worked). He had 
already heard the bad news. He put his arms around my neck 
and said, 'Don 't cry, Mama. I will always take care of you. ' All 
I had left in the world were my five wonderful children." 



183 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Amy worked hard trying to provide for her five small children 
with no money, no food, major rationing, and no mother to help 
with the children. "Elvin had to care for the other four 
children " while Amy worked. "I will be forever grateful to him 
for this." 




Elvin at about age 11. 

Remembering Elvin Wesley Goodson. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 



On March 22, 1944, Amy Pearl married Harold Thomas Child 
at Dillon, Montana. They made their home in Shelley, Idaho. 
Harold worked at Bellville's Machine Company and ran a small 
farm at Goshen. Here he and Amy milked cows, raised pigs, 
sheep, horses, and chickens, and a very large garden. They both 
worked hard to provide for their family. 

(Connie) "My earliest memories of my brother, Elvin, begin 
when I was about four years old. We were living in Shelley at 
that time, and I remember him practicing his guitar. Even at that 
early age, I was aware that Elvin was a good looking young 
man. 

"When we moved to the farm in Goshen, he got a horse, which 
he named Blue Tail Fly. I watched as Elvin struggled to mount 
this very spirited horse. To me the horse seemed wild and I was 
afraid of him. In my opinion, Elvin was the bravest teenager I 
had ever known trying to break Blue Tail Fly. 



"Shortly after we moved to the farm, I was about six years old 
by then, I remember riding with Elvin in his little coop car. 
Elvin was 10 Vi years older than I was, so he was 16 and had his 
driver's license. We ran out of gas on one of those rural country 
roads adjacent to a canal. Elvin gave me strict instructions to 
stay right in the car until he got back with a can of gas. I had no 
intention of paying any attention to him. He was my big brother 
after all and I had impulse-control challenges. As soon as he 
was a ways up the road with his back to the car, I got out and 
went to a house we had passed. A lady answered the door and 
I fabricated a whopper about being a starving little girl who had 
been left alone in a car for three days. Her facial expression 
reflected how incredulous she found my tale of woe but at the 



184 



Elvin Wesley Goodson (Child) and Betty June Walker 

same time she seemed amused. She gave me some food in a 
little sack. I thanked her and ran back toward the car. Before I 
could get to the car and enjoy my food, I saw Elvin coming back 
with a can of gas. I quickly threw the sack into the canal and 
jumped into the car, and waited for Elvin looking very innocent. 
When he walked up to the car, his first words were, 'Are you 
okay? ' I assured him I was fine and had been a very good girl 
in his absence. I'm sure my rusty halo fell around my ankles 
with that one! 




Elvin Wesley Goodson in his 
Air Force uniform. 



"The winter of 1949, was one of the worst on record. In 
January, a week or so before my eighth birthday, our parents 
dropped us off to see the matinee at the Virginia movie theater 
in Shelley. The sun was shining that afternoon, and it was a 
beautiful winter day. Bonnie, Shirley, and I enjoyed the movie, 
but by the time it was over, a terrible blizzard had begun and our 
parents were unable to drive to Shelley to get us because of the 
high drifts on the roads. They called our Uncle Carl Scobie and 
asked if we could stay the night at Grandma and Grandpa 
Child's home where he and Aunt Bea were living. Uncle Carl 
felt certain he could get us home with his jeep. 

"Uncle Carl picked us up and off we went into a severe blizzard. 
It wasn't long before Uncle Carl was lost, he thought he was on 
the Goshen Highway, but he was quite a ways off. His jeep 
became stuck in the deep snow and was literally buried. We 
were in a life-threatening situation. He put me on his back and 
Shirley and Bonnie tagged along the best they could and we set 
off to find the nearest house. We finally reached a farmhouse. 
Mr. and Mrs. Olsen, the older couple who lived there, took us 
in, dried our clothes, and warmed and fed us. Then they made 
cozy beds for us on the floor. 



> 

5 



"I was sleeping soundly when my big brother, Elvin, and some 
of his teenage buddies showed up at the door to take us home. 



185 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"They then went back out into the cold and dug Uncle Carl's 
jeep out of the snow. 




Elvin home on leave with Amy. 



"Elvin worked at Joe's Food Store in Shelley while he was in 
high school. He also had many chores to do on the farm. He 
has always been a hard worker and it seemed to me he was 
always very busy. 

"Elvin played basketball at Firth High School and was very 
good at it. During one game his ear was severely injured and 
this really frightened me. 

"After Elvin graduated from high school in about 1948, he 
joined the U.S. Air Force. In 1952, he came home with a really 
pretty young lady named Betty June Walker. Elvin was 
stationed at Lowry Air Force Base near Denver, Colorado. He 
probably met Betty there." 



ELVIN WESLEY GOODSON AND BETTY JUNE 
WALKER 



Elvin Wesley Goodson and Betty June 
Walker married September 1952. 

Remembering Elvin Wesley Goodson. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 



Michael Elvin Goodson 
born June 13, 1953. 



Elvin and Betty June Walker were married in August or 
September 1952, probably at Denver, Colorado. 

(Connie) "I think they were already married when they came to 
visit. One June 13, 1953, Betty gave birth to a little boy at the 
Air Force Base hospital in Colorado. I was then 12 years old, 
and was thrilled when they brought their adorable baby, Michael 
Elvin, home for us to see and play with. 



Linda Pearl Goodson 
born December 28, 1954. 



"Their second baby, Linda Pearl, was born December 28, 1954, 
at the same location. She was a darling baby. Betty kept her 
children impeccably clean and well groomed. It was always so 
fun when Elvin and Betty brought their little ones home for a 
visit. I loved helping Betty care for the babies. 



IK6 



Elvin Wesley Goodson (Child) and Betty June Walker 



Stephen Ray Goodson 
born September 16, 1956. 



"On September 16, 1956, Betty gave birth to their third child, 
Stephen Ray Goodson. I believe Elvin was still stationed in 
Colorado at that time. Elvin and Betty brought their family for 
a visit when little Stephen was just one week old. The adults all 
went out for dinner, and I had the privilege of taking care of 
these three darling babies. Stephen was such a sweet little baby. 



Deanna Gay Goodson 
born March 15, 1960. 

David Bert Goodson 
born May 28, 1961. 

Karen Lee Goodson 
born October 16, 1962. 



"Deanna Gay was the fourth child born to Elvin and Betty. She 
was born on March 15, 1960. Little David was their fifth child, 
and was born May 28, 1961. I didn't see these two babies until 
July 1 962. Deanna was just past two and was the most adorable 
little thing. At that time, Betty was expecting again, and little 
Karen was born on October 16, 1962. Richard and I were living 
in Hagerman, Idaho, not far from the U.S. Air Force Base at 
Mountain Home where Elvin was stationed. We got to see 
Elvin and Betty quite often and I have a distinct memory of 
David sleeping in his little crib. The birth order of Elvin and 
Betty's children is interesting: boy, girl, boy, girl, boy, girl! 



U.S. involved in Vietnam War 
from 1966 to 1969. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



Elvin was sent to Vietnam to fight during that horrific war and 
served valiantly. 

(Amy) "I remember standing at the airport with Betty watching 
Elvin walk away toward an airplane that would take him far 
away to fight in a war in Vietnam. We both sobbed as we 
watched the plane soar into the sky above the clouds." 



3 

> 

5 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1972-1973) 



(Lavina) July 31, 1972, Monday: "Went up to Amy and 
Harold's for supper. Elvin, Betty, and family were there. Mike 
(Caron) home on furlough. " 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., Undated) 



(Amy) "I love Elvin very much. He has been a good worker all 
his life and he has gone through some hard knocks. Elvin 
Wesley is brave, dependable, and stern. Elvin was a special 
comfort to me when I lost my dear mother so suddenly in a 
boating accident. He helped me so much at this tragic time in 
my life." 



187 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Remembering Elvin Wesley Goodson. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 




Elvin and Betty at the temple 
in Dallas, Texas. 



(Connie) "Elvin retired from the Air Force after 20 years of 
service. Following his retirement, he and his family moved 
back to Firth. He worked at various potato processing plants in 
the area and retired from the Pillsbury Processing Plant in 
Shelley, in the 1990s. 

"Betty and Elvin were set apart as temple workers and served in 
the Idaho Falls Temple. They were later called on a temple 
mission and served in Dallas, Texas. When they completed this 
mission, they returned to their work in the Idaho Falls Temple." 

On August 30, 2002, Elvin and Betty celebrated their 50 th 
wedding anniversary at a party hosted by their six children, their 
many grandchildren and great grandchildren. 

Elvin and Betty currently reside in Blackfoot, Idaho. They also 
own property in Island Park where they spend much of their 
summer. They have the following children: 



Michael Elvin Goodson was born June 13, 1953. 

Linda Pearl Goodson was born December 28, 1954. She is 
married to Kent Hunter. 

Stephen Ray Goodson was born September 16, 1956. He 
married Fawn . 

Deanna Gay Goodson was born March 15, 1960. She is 
married to Mike Christensen. 

David Bert Goodson was born May 28, 1961 . He is married to 
Kim . 

Karen Lee Goodson was born October 16, 1962. She is 
married to Jim Clark. 



188 



Elvin Wesley Goodson (Child) and Betty June Walker 




Elvin (top left) with Amy Jeanice; as a 
teenager (above left) in high school; and 
with his little brother, Terry (right), 
shortly after joining the U.S. Air Force. 
All photos courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 





j 

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3 



189 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



In 1984, Amy Pearl and her children 
gathered for the funeral of Harold Child. 
She is shown at left with her two sons: 
Harold Terry Child (left) and Elvin 
Wesley Goodson (right). Circa 1984. 
Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 




Betty June Walker and Elvin 
Wesley Goodson (right) 
celebrated their 50 th wedding 
anniversary with their six 
children and many grandchildren 
and great-grandchildren on 
August 30, 2002. Courtesy Elvin 
Goodson. 



190 



Elvin Wesley Goodson (Child) and Betty June Walker 




Amy Pearl Child posed for a five- 
generation picture (above). Standing 
behind her are Steven Goodson, Jennifer 
Goodson, and Elvin Wesley Goodson. 
Amy is holding her great great- 
granddaughter, McKenna. Circa 2001. 
Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 

Elvin and Betty Goodson are shown at 
left with Bonnie Rae Hansen (left) and 
Amy Pearl Child (right). Circa 1995. 
Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 




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191 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Elvin Wesley Goodson (above left) at a 
family picnic in 1987. Elvin is also 
pictured with his mom and three of his 
sisters (above right): L to R: Amy 
Jeanice, Connie LaRaine, Shirley Jean, 
Amy Pearl, and Elvin. 

Amy Pearl Child (right) in about 1985. 

All pictures courtesy Bonnie Rae 
Hansen. 




192 



Chapter 9 
AMY JEANICE GOODSON 

AND 
BARBER DEWANE DYE, JR. 




3 

-X 

-3 

c 
3 



Amy Jeanice Goodson (Child) and Barber Dewane Dye, Jr. 

August 1986. 



Information for this chapter provided 

by Connie LaRaine Martin 

and Bonnie Rae Hansen. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Amy Pearl Madsen 

Born: 4 Aug 1912, Cache, Fremont, Idaho 
Died: 1 9 Jul 2002, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 


v 



Married: John Wesley Goodson 

Born: 1 Nov 1910, Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Died: _ Mar 1 987, Arco, Butte, Idaho 



Amy Jeanice Goodson 

Born: 14 Dec, 1931, St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Barber Dewane Dye, Jr. 

Born: 5 Jun 1929, Firth, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Eugene Dewane Dye 

Born: 10 May 1951, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Randy Lynn Dye 

Born: 31 May 1952, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Sheryl Jeanene Dye 

Born: 18 Aug 1956, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Julie Nylene Dye 

Born: 19 Apr 1959, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idah 
Died: Living 



Dennis Bryant Dye 

Born: 14 Dec 1954, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Amy Jeanice Goodson (Child) and Barber Dewane Dye, Jr. 
AMY JEANICE GOODSON 



1931 



Amy Jeanice Goodson 
born December 14, 1931. 




Amy Jeanice Goodson. 
Circa 1933. 

A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



Amy Jeanice Goodson was born December 14, 1931, in 
St. Anthony, Fremont County, Idaho. Jeanice was the second 
child born to Amy Pearl Madsen and John Wesley Goodson. 
She was born in the small rooms above the cafe run by her 
grandmother, Mary Madsen. Her older brother, Elvin, was 
17 months old when Jeanice joined the family. The effects of 
the stock market crash of October 1929, were felt everywhere; 
there was no work, no money, and no way to buy food and other 
necessities. 

When Jeanice was three years old, her mother, who was 22 at 
that time, filed for divorce from Wes; the divorce was granted 
on March 25, 1935. Wes later married Ruby L. Davis and 
Jeanice has 10 brothers and sisters from that marriage. 

On April 22, 1935, Amy married Emmett Noel Hubbard. The 
family lived in a small home at 673 East College Street, located 
across the street from Jeanice's grandmother, Mary Madsen. 

(Amy) "Jeanice was the cutest little girl. She loved to have fun 
and made us laugh a lot. She never seemed to take life too 
seriously and never asked for help. If she couldn't do a thing 
one way, she would do it another. I remember she had lace-up 
shoes and during her play the laces had become in a knot. When 
it was time for bed, she couldn't get the knots out of her shoes 
so she went to bed with her shoes on." 



1941 

U.S. at war with Japan and Germany, 

World War II. 



During the next five years, three little sisters were added to the 
family: Shirley Jean, born January 6, 1936; Bonnie Rae, born 
August 3, 1937; and Connie LaRaine, born January 14, 1941. 



During at least 1 94 1 , Jeanice's grandmother kept a diary, which 
reflects the love and care she provided her grandchildren: 



195 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 




Amy Jeanice Goodson. 
Circa 1932. 



Massive rationing in the US 
to support the war effort. 



(Mary) February 1, 1941, Saturday: "1 went over to Amy 's to 
take care of the babies while Amy went down town to see about 
her teeth. Bonnie and Shirley are going to stay with me tonight. 
Elvin and Jeanice went to stay with Ida. " 

September 6, Saturday: "Amy came over this afternoon. She 
mopped the kitchen floor, then unpicked an old fur coat and 
washed it. I am going to make Jeanice a coat out of it. I went 
over to Amy 's a little while tonight. It rained all morning. " 

September 8, Monday: "/ made a coat for Jeanice. Fits good. 
Amy cleaned my front room this afternoon. " 

September 17, Wednesday: "Amy went to town again this 
morning. The kids stayed here. They ate dinner here today. 
Amy got some coal and groceries. I ate supper with Amy. She 
gave me a pan of hot rolls. Jeanice is sleeping with me tonight." 

September 29, Monday: "I sewed Bonnie a coat, and a dress 
for Jeanice. " 

September 30, Tuesday: "I sewed dresses for Jeanice, Shirley, 
and Bonnie. I am getting tired of sewing. Will quit for awhile." 



On April 22, 1943, when Jeanice was 1 1 years old, Amy and 
Emmett were divorced. Amy was working at a night club from 
6:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m., then walking across the street to the 
New Club Cafe where she worked from 10:00 p.m. until 
6:00 a.m. Elvin also worked at the New Club Cafe during the 
daytime as a dishwasher. The four little girls were cared for at 
night by their grandmother, Mary Madsen. 



Mary Hansen Madsen, Nellie Madsen 

Standen, Thelma Heath Standen, and 

Sandra Standen all 

died in a boating accident 

July 19, 1943. 



(Joy) "Our family reunion was usually held close to my 
mother's (Lavina's) birthday, which was July 18. We met at the 
park in St. Anthony. Uncle George and Aunt Nell Standon 
stayed the night with Mom (Lavina) and, in the morning, 



196 



Amy Jeanice Goodson (Child) and Barber Dewane Dye, Jr. 



Conversations with Merry F. Shaw. 
(Freeman, Joy F., Various) 




Amy Jeanice at about the time she 
graduated from high school. 



gathered their things and said they were going to drive up to 
Island Park Reservoir to go fishing. They allowed Doris to stay 
with Mom. Grandma Madsen loved to fish and asked to go 
along. The boat developed a leak and slowly sank. George and 
Nell, their son Bill, his wife Thelma, and granddaughter, Sandra, 
were also in the boat when it went down. My grandmother died 
of a heart attack. The only ones to survive were Uncle George 
and Bill. It was really a tragic experience." 

Amy worked hard to provide for her five young children. 
Massive rationing was imposed on everyone in the United States 
in order to support the war effort, which added to the problems 
of providing food and other necessities for the family. And 
Amy no longer had her mother to help her with the children. 
Elvin was now in charge of his four little sisters while Amy 
worked at night. 

About this time, Jeanice's mother began dating Harold Child. 
Just before Christmas, 1943, Amy accepted a ring from Harold, 
but later had misgivings and returned the ring. This upset 
Jeanice who had grown to love Harold. Amy took the ring back 
and they continued to date into Spring 1944. 



5 i 



On March 22, 1944, Amy Pearl married Harold Thomas Child 
at Dillon, Montana. They made their home in Shelley, Idaho, 
where Harold worked at the Bellville Machine Company. He 
also owned a small farm at Goshen. Here he and Amy milked 
cows, raised pigs, sheep, horses, and chickens, and a very large 
garden. They both worked hard to provide a home for this 
family. 



Conversations. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004-2005) 



(Marlene) "While we were living in Firth (about 1945), Mom 
(Ruby) got really sick, I don't remember from what. Jeanice 
came and stayed with us for a long time while Mom was in bed. 
She helped with the housework and younger girls. She is a few 
years older than I am so she was probably 1 3 or 1 4 at that time." 



197 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Memories of my sister, Jeanice. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 



(Connie) "My sister, Jeanice, is nine years older than I am and 
is a very special and unique daughter of God. I was very 
attached to Jeanice when I was young. I remember how kind 
she always was to me. One time, when I was about four years 
old, I was crying and acting like a little brat. It was obvious I 
needed to go to bed. Jeanice very gently and kindly, with no 
coercion of any kind, persuaded me to lie down on my bed. She 
covered me with a blanket and lay down beside me. I remember 
the sunshine streaming in the window and how peaceful I felt 
laying there with my big sister. I almost immediately fell 
asleep. When I woke up, I was surprised to find it was the next 
morning! 



Harold Terry Child 
born August 22, 1946. 



Memories of My Sister, Jeanice. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 



"It was about that same time that I contracted both measles and 
mumps at the same time. Jeanice was so kind and nurturing to 
me while I was sick. Except she tried to feed me spinach. I'm 
sure she thought it would speed my recovery, but she couldn't 
have been farther off course. I still have pictures of her trying 
to entice me to eat something. Her vocal expression told me 
these foods were good, but her body language told me a whole 
different story. Her well-intentioned tactics were not 
successful." 

When Jeanice was 14, her mother gave birth to a little boy. He 
was named Harold Terry Child for his father and grandfather. 
He was born August 22, 1946. 

(Connie) "We moved to our little 40-acre farm in Goshen in 
April 1947, not long after Terry was born. The previous owner 
had a dog named Captain. The dog was so bonded with the 
farm, he would not stay with them no matter how many times 
they came and took him home. They finally consented to let our 
family keep the dog. Jeanice especially loved Captain and vise 
versa. 

"We used to invent games to entertain ourselves and Jeanice 
was really good at inventing. She came up with one game 
where she was the 'wolf woman.' She was the most authentic 



IW 




Jeanice Dye, Terry, and Connie 
with Amy in 1959. 



Amy Jeanice Goodson (Child) and Barber Dewane Dye, Jr. 

sounding wolf woman. It both fascinated and frightened me and 
my sisters to listen to her howling like a wolf when we played. 



"The fourth of July was always a very special holiday for 
Jeanice. She made her own firecracker bag. I always waited 
with baited breath to see what her bag would be like each 
Fourth. I was never disappointed." 

Jeanice attended school at Goshen and graduated from Firth 
High School. She met Dewane Dye at school. He had lived his 
entire life in Firth. 



Memories of My Sister, Jeanice. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 



(Connie) "When Jeanice agreed to marry Dewane, I was very 
upset and did not want her to get married and leave me. My 
little nine-year-old brain began inventing ways to prevent this 
marriage. One of my plans was to wrap myself in a white sheet 
and stand by Jeanice's bed while she was sleeping. I would 
gently wake her by calling her name. Once I had her awake, I 
would tell her I was an angel from heaven come to tell her she 
shouldn't get married but stay on the little farm. She should 
keep things the way they were. I came up with many such 
childish plans but never carried through with any of them." 



BARBER DEWANE DYE, JR. 

On June 5, 1929, Dewane Dye was born at Firth, Bingham 
County, Idaho. He attended school at Firth and graduated from 
high school there. Following high school, he served two years 
in the U.S. Navy. 

AMY JEANICE GOODSON AND BARBER DEWANE 
DYE, JR. 



Amy Jeanice Goodson and Barber 
Dewane Dye married July 20, 1950. 



Amy Jeanice Goodson and Barber Dewane Dye, Jr., were 
married July 20, 1950, in the Idaho Falls Temple. 



199 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Memories of My Sister, Jeanice. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 

Eugene Dewane Dye 
born May 10, 1951. 

Randy Lynn Dye 
born May 21, 1952. 

Dennis Bryant Dye 
born December 14, 1954. 

Sheryl Jeanene 
born August 18, 1956. 

Julie Nylene Dye 
born April 19, 1959. 




Dewane and their five children. 
December 1959. 



Jeanice and Dewane settled in Firth, Idaho, and remained there 
throughout their married life. 

(Connie) "I was so lonely once my sister was gone from the 
family nest. However, my sadness was quickly dispelled when 
she gave birth to their first son, Eugene Dewane, on May 10, 
195 1 . Words escape me when I try to express the beauty of this 
occasion. What a wonderful event and positive influence this 
birth was on my life. 

"Eugene was followed by Randy Lynn, born May 31, 1952; 
Dennis Bryant, born December 14, 1954; and Sheryl Jeanene, 
born August 18, 1956. What a joy these little nieces and 
nephews were in my life. They were the apple of my eye and I 
got to spend lots of time with them. Little Julie Nylene was 
born April 19, 1959. I didn't get much time to spend with Julie 
because I soon graduated from high school and went on with my 
life. 

"In 1957, Dewane got a job as a heavy equipment operator for 
the Gay Mine, located on the Shoshone-Bannock Reservation. 

"During the 1960s, when rock and roll became so popular, I can 
truly say Jeanice and Dewane were 'twist champions.' I can 
still hear Chubby Checkers in my mind just shouting the 
invitation to 'Come on Everybody, Let's Do The Twist. ' Jeanice 
loved the song, 'Rambling Rose.' I think of her every time I 
hear that beautiful song." 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Amy) "Christmas was always a special time in the Child home. 
We always had a program on Christmas Eve and all the children 
took parts. After Jeanice and Dewane were married, they came 
and brought their children. There were lots of lights, bells, 
tinsel, and a big tree standing in the corner all lit up and 
glowing. Songs were sung, the stories about Jesus were told and 
retold, and I played the organ. Usually Dewane sang as well. 
He has a beautiful singing voice. 



200 



Amy Jeanice Goodson (Child) and Barber Dewane Dye, Jr. 




Julie Nylene Dye 
born April 19, 1959. 



"Another winter fun time was going to 'pulling hill.' It was fun 
pulling those little sleighs to the top of the hill and coasting 
down. Jeanice and her family joined in as well and Jeanice flew 
down the hill laughing and screaming with joy. Terry, Eugene, 
Randy, and Dennis ran up that hill dozens of times. Then they 
would slide down with the snow flying in their faces. Harold 
helped pull the sleighs to the top and came down with one of the 
little ones in front. I usually had Sherry on my sleigh and 
Dewane would bring Julie, who was just a baby. 

"Sherry was about three years old then and was so cute with her 
little short legs and her little overshoes. She just screamed and 
laughed all the way down." 



Memories of My Sister, Jeanice. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 




Dewane and Jeanice in 1986. 



In 1992, after 35 years at the Gay Mine, the last few working in 
the shop, Dewane retired. Through the years, Jeanice and 
Dewane have had various interests including boating, bowling, 
dancing, and traveling. 

On July 20, 2000, they celebrated their 50 th wedding 
anniversary. 

(Connie) "I have so many fun memories of my sister, Jeanice. 
She is a beautiful woman who has always been immaculate in 
her personal grooming and her household. She has a good heart 
and tender feelings, and is interesting and a very colorful person. 
As sisters, we have had many wonderful times together. One of 
my hopes is that, someday, in another place and time, Jeanice 
will come to the knowledge of what a wonderful and precious 
person she is. I know that someday our Savior will right all 
wrongs and wipe away our tears. 



Child, Amy M., in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Amy) "Amy Jeanice has always been understanding about 
illness, friendly, and has a pretty smile. She always told me I 
was her very best friend. She helped so much with the work at 
home, in the field, or cleaning house. She was always jovial and 
good natured. 



201 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"Eugene was so special to me. He was my first grandchild. I 
loved this kid. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M.. 1971) 



"Randy was the nonchalant, lucky go easy one. Anything was 
all right with him, just so it wasn't too late for dinner. 

"Dennis had his little pouting spells but you had to know our 
cute little Den Boy to appreciate his cute pouting and goodness. 
He was so precious and I loved him so much. 




Randy, Dennis, Eugene, 
and Sherry Dye. 



"Sherry was my girl for sure. I loved this little girl. She is very 
dear to me. Once I bought matching pink dresses for Sherry and 
me to wear. 

"Julie was the cutest little thing. She was so shy, but she never 
caused any trouble. She would stand in her play pen by the 
hour, going from one little foot to the other. She loved to be out 
with Terry and one day, when she was still very small, she was 
standing on the couch on her tip toes watching him out the 
window. He must have fallen down or something, and Julie 
said, 'Ha, ha, Terry. ' And she laughed and laughed." 

Jeanice and Dewane derive great pleasure from their children 
and grandchildren. 



202 



Amy Jeanice Goodson (Child) and Barber Dewane Dye, Jr. 




**«crT'T*» 




Eugene Dewane Dye (above left) in 
1963, at age 12 in sixth grade; 
Dewane at age 18 (above right); 
and at the temple (right) with his 
new wife, Connie. 

All photos courtesy Bonnie Rae 
Hansen. 




203 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 






Dennis Bryant Dye (above left) in 1963, at age nine. He was in third grade. His brother, Randy 
Lynn Dye (above right), was age 1 1, and in fifth grade in 1963. 





Sheryl Jeanene is shown (above left) with her beloved grandmother, Amy, and (above right) in 1963, 
at age seven when she was in the second grade. All these photos are courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



204 



Amy Jeanice Goodson (Child) and Barber Dewane Dye, Jr. 




Amy Jeanice Dye and Bonnie Rae Hansen (above left) 
exchanging a gift. Amy Jeanice and Dewane (at left) 
shown with one of their granddaughters, Tia Bell. 
Both photos courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 




i 

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ice 



Amy Jeanice 
attended the funeral 
for her adopted 
father, Harold Child, 
in November 1984. 
She is pictured at 
right with her mother 
and sisters, 
L to R: Amy Jeanice 
Dye, Shirley Jean 
Burris, Amy Pearl 
Child, Bonnie Rae 
Hansen, and Connie 
LaRaine Martin. 
Circa 1984. 
Courtesy Bonnie Rae 
Hansen. 




205 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Harold and Amy Pearl (far left) are shown with their six children: L to R: Elvin, Connie, Jeanice, 
Bonnie, Terry, and Shirley. Note on the back of this photograph says, "Harold and Amy Child 
Family Reunion, Summer 1978. Photography by DewR D." Circa 1978. Courtesy Terry Child. 



206 



Chapter 10 
SHIRLEY JEAN HUBBARD 

AND 
WESLEY DELOY BURRIS 




Shirley Jean 

Hubbard (Child) 

Burris. Circa 

1950s. Courtesy 

Bonnie Rae 

Hansen. 



Information for this 

chapter provided 

by Connie LaRaine 

Martin and Bonnie 

Rae Hansen. 

Edited by Merry 

Foster Shaw. 



Amy Pearl Madsen 

Born: 4 Aug 1912, Cache, Fremont, Idaho 
Died: 1 9 Jul 2002, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 



T 



Married: Emmett Noel Hubbard 

Born: 9 Feb 1905, Centertown, Ohio, Kentucky 
Died: 29 Sep 1973, Riverside, Orange, California 



Shirley Jean Hubbard 

Born: 6 Jan 1936, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Wesley DeLoy Burris 

Born: 1 6 Nov 1 929, Hyrum, Cache, Utah 
Died: 3 1 Aug 2003, Logan, Cache, Utah 



Kathy Jean Burris 

Born: 15 Sep 1959, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Died: 3 Nov 2005, Hyrum, Cache, Utah 



Bart Deloy Burris 

Born: 18 Aug 1961, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Died: Living 



Craig Child Burris 

Born: 23 Sep 1963, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Died: Living 



Susan Kaye Burris 

Born: 8 Feb 1976, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Died: Living 



Shirley Jean Hubbard (Child) and Wesley DeLoy Burris 



1936 



Shirley Jean Hubbard 
born January 6, 1936. 

Remnants From the Life Tapestry of 

Shirley Jean Hubbard Burris. 

(Martin, Connie H., 2004) 



SHIRLEY JEAN HUBBARD 

Shirley Jean's season to be born was January 6, 1936. At that 
time the family was living at 673 East College Street, Idaho 
Falls, Idaho, and consisted of her mom and dad, Emmett Noel 
and Amy Pearl Madsen Hubbard; an older brother, Elvin 
Wesley Goodson, and a sister, Amy Jeanice Goodson. 

On August 3, 1937, a third little girl joined the family. She was 
named Bonnie Rae Hubbard. 




Amy Pearl holding Shirley Jean 
Hubbard. Circa 1936. 

A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



To every thing there is a season, 

and a time to every purpose 

under the heaven; 

A time to be born, 

and a time to die. 

(Ecclesiastes 3:1 & 2) 



A few days after Christmas, 1937, Shirley suddenly became 
very ill. She was not quite two years old and her condition was 
so serious her mom and grandmother, Mary Madsen, called in 
Dr. Fred Call. Following his examination, he informed the 
family he believed Shirley was suffering from inflamation of the 
bowels and instructed Amy and Mary Madsen, Shirley's 
grandmother, in the proper methods to care for her. 

(Amy) "My mother and I worked on her for two days and a 
night, but it was all in vain. The dear little girl became worse by 
the hour. Toward evening on New Year's Day, she was so 
much worse, she was slipping into a coma. 

"I called the doctor again. He worked over her for a few 
minutes, then took the sheet and covered her little curly head. 
He then turned to me and said there wasn't anything he could do 
for her. In his opinion, my baby was dying. 

"I tore the sheet from her head and tucked a blanket around her. 
Then I ran out into the snow (it was a very cold night but I never 
noticed). I knelt there in the snow and pleaded with God in 
Heaven to help me to know what to do for my baby. 
Immediately the Holy Spirit was with me and I knew what I 
must do to save my baby. 



209 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Emmett and Amy Hubbard. 
Circa 1937. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 




Shirley Jean Hubbard. 
Circa 1938. 



"I arose and ran as quickly as I could to the neighbor's to use 
their telephone (we didn't own one). I called Elder Jess Croft 
and requested he come quickly and administer to my little girl. 
Elder Croft brought another man with him and they anointed her 
little head with consecrated oil and gave her a beautiful blessing. 
While the blessing was being given, my mother and I saw a 
quick flicker in her little throat." 

Elder Croft offered to drive Amy and the baby to the hospital. 
Grandma Mary stayed at home with Elvin and Jeanice. Shirley 
was placed in a private room and Dr. Walter West came to 
examine her. Shirley was not breathing and her color had gone 
from blue to purple. The doctor checked her pulse and said, 
"Why did you bring me a dead baby to heal? " Cruel words to 
a distraught mother. 

Elder Croft remained with the family and gave comfort to Amy. 
Amy pleaded with him to give her strength to not give up. "He 
kindly put his arms around my shoulders. I swear I could feel 
the power of the Priesthood come into my body from this good 
man. I whispered, 'my baby will live. '" 

The doctor did order care for Shirley and diagnosed her with 
quick pneumonia, a deadly disease. In those days visitors were 
not allowed in the rooms because "we were in the way. My 
husband came and we sat on the floor outside Shirley 's room 
and waited and prayed. While we waited, we heard the whistles 
and bells ringing in the new year, 1938." Elder Croft also 
remained throughout the night. 

At 3:00 a.m., the nurse finally emerged from the room and 
informed the waiting group that Shirley was breathing on her 
own and color was returning to her face. At 5:00 a.m., Amy and 
Emmett were allowed into the room to see their baby. She was 
in an oxygen tent with a small window in front. Emmett stood 
on one side of the bed and Amy on the other. "Hi, Daddy. Hi, 
Mama. That was the happiest sound a mother could hear. 



210 



Shirley Jean Hubbard (Child) and Wesley DeLoy Burris 




Shirley Jean and 
Bonnie Rae Hubbard. 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard 
born January 14, 1941. 



Shirley looked just like an angel fresh from Heaven with her 
radiant green eyes. " 

Dr. West returned to the hospital and 6:00 a.m. and, when he 
came out of Shirley's, room he exclaimed a true miracle had 
taken place in that room that night. "I thought when I came 
back this morning, she would be gone, " he said. 

Shirley spent 14 days in the hospital recovering and during that 
time, she celebrated her second birthday on January 6, 1938. 
Many years later (October 23, 1971), Amy traveled to Rigby to 
visit the site of a train derailment. The train had been hauling 
cattle and the scene was terrible. As they stood observing the 
wreckage, three men approached. One of them turned out to be 
Elder Jess Croft. He did not recognize Amy, but as soon as she 
mentioned the little sick girl he had healed, he knew at once 
who she was. He commented that he had related this experience 
on many different occasions: the severe illness of a little girl 
and the faith of a mother. 

Shirley had the ill fortune to have her parents marriage end in 
divorce. Her mother then found employment at a small cafe in 
Idaho Falls where she worked the night shift. Grandma Mary 
stayed with the children while their mother was away. 



Japan bombed Pearl Harbor 

December 7, 1941. U.S. declared 

war on Japan. 

Second World War. 



Times were very difficult during Shirley's early childhood years 
made even more so by the enforced rationing resulting from the 
war effort. Many of the daily staples were in short supply and 
parents were very careful not to allow their children to waste 
one morsel of food. Food stamps were issued to each person 
and these were used to obtain the small amount of sugar, flour, 
and other staples rationed so the balance could go to the service 
men fighting in Europe and the South Pacific. 



Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen Madsen, 

Nell Madsen Standen, Thelma Standen 

and Sandra Standen drowned 

July 19, 1943. 



On July 17, 1943, Shirley's beloved grandmother kissed her 
goodbye and left to attend the Madsen family reunion in 
St. Anthony, Idaho. It was held on Sunday, July 18, at the local 
park. 



211 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Shirley Jean Hubbard. 
Circa about 1942 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



Following the reunion, Grandma Mary and her daughter Nell, 
son-in-law George, grandson Bill, and his wife and daughter, 
Thelma and Sandra, stayed the night with Amy's sister, Lavina. 
On July 19, they drove to Island Park Reservoir to fish for the 
day. The boat developed a slow leak and all were lost except 
George Standen and his son, Bill. Grandma Mary suffered a 
heart attack, but Nell, Thelma, and Sandra drowned in the 10- 
to 20-foot lake. Even though Shirley was only six years old at 
the time, she still remembers how distraught her mother was 
when she saw the morning paper on July 20, and realized it was 
her family about whom they were writing. 

Shirley's mother continued to work the night shift at the cafe 
and left Shirley, Bonnie, and Connie in the care of their older 
siblings, Elvin and Jeanice, who were about 13 and 11, 
respectively. 

(Amy) "Shirley had lots of dark brown hair when she was 
younger. She loved to be indoors. I always knew if I left 
Shirley in charge of the house work, it would be done right. 
And she has always been very helpful to me." 



Harold Terry Child 
born August 22, 1946. 



In 1944, Amy married Harold Thomas Child and they moved 
the family to Shelley, Idaho. It was here Amy gave birth to her 
second son, Harold Terry Child, on August 22, 1946. In 1947, 
Harold and Amy moved to a 40-acre farm in Goshen, Idaho, a 
small farming community near Blackfoot. 



Remnants From the Life Tapestry of 

Shirley Jean Hubbard Burris. 

(Martin, Connie H., 2004) 



As Shirley grew, she practiced her talent as a vocalist and 
developed a beautiful soprano voice. She and Bonnie Rae sang 
well together and were invited to perform at various functions. 
They competed in an amateur talent show held by the local 
television station in Idaho Falls. (Connie) "They both looked so 
lovely and, in my opinion, sounded professional. " 



During high school, Shirley won the leading role in a musical 
production of "Cinderella." 



212 



Shirley Jean Hubbard (Child) and Wesley DeLoy Burris 




Shirley Jean Hubbard in school. 



(Connie) "I remember her practicing her main song, 'Someday 
My Prince Will Come. ' Her beautiful soprano voice resonated 
throughout the farm. I loved being a spectator as she rehearsed 
each song and dance routine under the tall yard light down by 
the barn. She reminded me of Julie Andrews who sang that the 
'Hills are alive with the sound of music. ' Our farm was 
certainly alive with the sound of music and, in my opinion, 
Shirley's singing was every bit as beautiful and awe-inspiring 
as that of Julie Andrews. The night of the production, Shirley 
wore a peach-colored satin formal and looked truly beautiful." 

About this same time, Shirley and Clifton Teeples, another 
member of the Goshen Ward, were invited to Salt Lake City, 
Utah, to sing in a one-time performance with the Tabernacle 
Choir. However, circumstances prevented Shirley from taking 
advantage of this wonderful opportunity. 



In 1955, Shirley graduated from the Firth High School. 

She met Wesley DeLoy Burris in 1957, and they began dating. 

WESLEY DELOY BURRIS 

Wesley DeLoy Burris is the son of Wesley and Jennie May 
Nielsen Burris. He was born November 16, 1929, in Hyrum, 
Cache, Utah. 

SHIRLEY JEAN HUBBARD AND WESLEY DELOY 
BURRIS 



Shirley Jean Hubbard married 
Wesley DeLoy Burris October 23, 

1958. 

Kathy Jean Burris 
born September 15, 1959. 

Bart Deloy Burris 
born August 18, 1961. 



On October 23, 1958, Shirley and Wesley DeLoy Burris were 
married in the Logan Temple. They settled in Hyrum, Utah, 
where they purchased a small home. 

Shirley and DeLoy have four children: Kathy Jean Burris, born 
September 15, 1959; Bart Deloy Burris, born August 18, 1961; 



213 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Craig Child Burris 
born September 23, 1963. 

Susan Kaye Burris 
born February 8, 1976. 







President Spencer W. Kimball. 



Craig Child Burris, born September 23, 1963; and Susan Kaye 
Burris, born February 8, 1976. 

Shirley and DeLoy were later divorced. 

In 1980, Shirley was working for the Blue Bird catering service 
in Logan, Utah. At that time, the Logan Temple was being 
rededicated and the Blue Bird catering service was hired to 
provide dinner at Stake President Hancy's home for one of the 
nights that the first presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints was staying there. At that time the presidency 
consisted of President Spencer W. Kimball, President Marion G. 
Romney, and President L. Nathan Tanner. Shirley was excited 
and honored when the management of the catering service chose 
her as one of those who would deliver and serve the dinner that 
night. She was excited and anxious as she arrived at President 
Hancy's home to prepare the meal and await the arrival of the 
First Presidency and their wives. 



"Shirley was very impressed with the level of security 
protection afforded the Prophet and those traveling with him. 
She felt it a great honor to serve the First Presidency and, 
following the meal, each of the employees of the catering 
service was introduced to the Prophet and his Counselors. As 
the introductions were made, these great men stood and shook 
each hand and expressed their gratitude for the meal and the 
work involved in preparing and serving. Shirley felt a keen 
sense of spirituality while she was in the presence of the 
Prophet, Seer, and Revelator and his Counselors. This was one 
of the highlights of her life." 

Shirley is no stranger to hard woik. She has always kept her 
home in immaculate condition and is just as careful with her 
personal grooming. She is careful about her health as well. But 
her best quality is her devotion to the principles and teachings 
of the cause of Zion. She attends the temple regularly. She is 
also a devoted mother and grandmother. 



214 



Shirley Jean Hubbard (Child) and Wesley DeLoy Burris 



Remnants From the Life Tapestry of 

Shirley Jean Hubbard Burris. 

(Martin, Connie H., 2004) 



(Connie) "It is true as the scriptures teach, there is a season for 
all things. Shirley Jean's earlier brush with death provide her 
with a personal testimony of the truthfulness of these holy 
words. Shirley has been and continues to be the recipient of 
choice blessings from our loving Heavenly Father. She has also 
been the means whereby others of our brothers and sisters here 
on earth have been blessed by His goodness. King Benjamin 
mused about the possibility of his singing with the heavenly 
choirs. Perhaps it may be in the realm of possibility that 
Shirley's beautiful voice will likewise sing with the choirs on 
high." 



Letter to Merry F. Shaw. 
(Burris, Shirley Jean, 2003) 



(Shirley) "I spent my youth living in Idaho Falls, Shelley, and 
Goshen, Idaho. My marriage didn't work out. I have four 
children and seven grandchildren. I currently live in Logan, 
Utah, and my children live close by. I work one day each week 
at the Logan Temple." 



On August 31, 2003, Wesley DeLoy Burris passed away on 
following a lingering illness. 

Shirley's family consists of the following children and 
grandchildren: 

Kathy Jean Burris was born September 15, 1959, at Logan, 
Cache County, Utah. Kathy did not marry and passed away on 
November 3, 2005. 

Bart Deloy Burris was born August 18, 1961 at Logan, Cache 
County, Utah. 

Craig Child Burris was born on September 23, 1963, at Logan, 
Cache County, Utah. On July 10, 1986, he married Sharie 
Oberhancey in the Logan Temple. They are the parents of three 
children: Landyn Craig, born December 18, 1989; Hayden 
Kenneth, born March 28, 1992; and Sierra Michele, born 
September 20, 1994. These children were also born at Logan, 
Utah. 



215 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Susan Kaye Burris was born February 8, 1976, at Logan, 
Cache County, Utah. She married Jacob Black and they were 
later divorced. She was then married to Brian Winward. She is 
the mother of Brindee Kay, born August 27, 1997; Dalton Brian 
Winward, born November 25, 1998 (stillborn); Chase Thomas, 
born December 24, 2002; and Brooklyn Jean, born August 2, 
2003. Susan Kaye resides in Logan, Utah, where all her 
children were born. Susan is currently married to Brian Auger 
and they have a son, Brian Dylan, born September 16, 2005. 



Obituary for Kathy Jean Burris. 
Courtesy Shirley Jean Burris. 




Xathy Jean "Burris 

Born — September 15, 1959 — Logan, Utah 
Died - Novem)>er 3, 2005 - Hyrum, Utah 

Daughter of 
W. Deloy and Shirley Child Burris 

SERVICES CONDUCTED 

Monday - November 7, 2005 - 1 1:00 a.m. 

Hyrum 5 ,h /7 ,h Ward Chapel 

Bishop Gary Johnson, Conducting 



PALLBEARERS 



Bart Burris 
Craig Burris 
Brian Auger 
l.andyn Burris 



Hayden Burris 

Chase Auger 

Courtney Adams 

Steve Adams 



SERVICES 

Family Prayer Craig Burris, Brother 

Prelude & Postlude Music LaRae Adams 

Invocation Kevin Jones, Family Friend 

Tribute/Obituary Elaine Adams, Family Friend 

Congregational Hymn No. 136 

"I Know That My Redeemer Lives" 
Tami Webb, Chorister - LaRae Adams, Accompanist 

Speaker Steve Adams, Family Friend 

Musical Selection Tami Webb 

"I Am a Child of God" (Rewritten) 
LaRae Adams, Accompanist 

Speaker Ivan Miller, Family Friend 

Remarks Bishop Gary Johnson 

Congregational Hymn No. 152 

"God Be with You Till We Meet Again" 
Benediction Gretta Hansen, Family Friend 

CONCLUDING SERVICE 

Hyrum City Cemetery 
Dedication of Grave Dennis Leishman, Family Friend 

HONORARY PALLBEARERS 

Dylan Auger Bradley Adams 

Compassionate Service provided by the 
Hyrum 5' h Ward Relief Society 



216 



Shirley Jean Hubbard (Child) and Wesley Deloy Burris 





These pictures of Kathy Jean Burris (above left) and Bart Deloy Burris (above right) were taken 
while they were in high school. Pictures of Craig Child Burris (below left) and Susan Kaye Burris 
(below right) were taken while they were in junior high school. Susan was 14 years of age when 
her photo was taken. Circa 1990. Courtesy Shirley Burris. 





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217 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




onnie LaRaine Martin, Bonnie Rae Hansen, and Shirley Jean Burris (top photo, L to R) at the 
viewing for their mother on July 23, 2002. Also taken at the viewing was the lower picture of 
Amy's six children: from left to right, they are Elvin Goodson, Amy Jeanice Dye, Shirley Jean 
Burris, Bonnie Rae Hansen, Connie LaRaine Martin, and Harold Terry Child. Courtesy Shirley 
Burris. 



2IK 



Shirley Jean Hubbard (Child) and Wesley Deloy Burris 




On July 24, 2002, Shirley and some of her family attended the 
funeral for Amy Pearl Child. Back row, L to R: Craig, his 
wife, Sharie, Shirley Jean, Landyn, and Susan Kaye, holding 
her son, Chase. Front row, L to R: Hayden, Sierra, and 
Brindee. Kathy and Bart, Shirley's older children, were 
unable to attend. 

Our Madsen reunion was held July 17, 2004, at the city park 
in Tetonia, Idaho. Shirley (right) attended with her grand- 
daughter, Brindee. 

Both pictures courtesy Shirley Burris. 



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219 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Craig Child Burris (above) with his wife, Sharie, and their three children: Layndyn, Hayden, and 
Sierra. Circa 1997. Courtesy Shirley Burris. 



Shirley's daughter, Susan 
Kaye, has three children 
shown at right, L to R: 
Brindee, Brooklyn, and 
Chase. Circa 2003. 
Courtesy Shirley Burris. 




'JJrifiJtr. Cfhhw t\ 'ftnwkiift! 



220 



Chapter 11 
BONNIE RAE HUBBARD 

AND 
GARY DAVID HANSEN 




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Bonnie Rae Hubbard and Gary David Hansen with five of their children: 
Kelley David, Haley Rae, Starlee Jill, Lori Gay, and Debbie Kaye (in back). 



Information for this chapter provided 

by Bonnie Rae Hansen 

and Connie LaRaine Martin. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Amy Pearl Madsen 

Born: 4 Aug 1912, Cache, Fremont, Idaho 
Died: 19 Jul 2002, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 



T 



Married: Emmett Noel Hubbard 

Born: 9 Feb 1905, Centertown, Ohio, Kentucky 
Died: 29 Sep 1973, Riverside, Orange, California 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard 

Born: 3 Aug 1937, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Gary David Hansen 

Born: 1 Nov 1936, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Died: Living 



Debbie Kaye Hansen 

Born: 9 May 1957, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Died: Living 



Kelley David Hansen 

Born: 28 Dec 1961, Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minn 
Died: Living 



Lori Gay Hansen 

Born: 9 Feb 1964, Oregon City, Clackamus, 
Oregon 



Starlee Jill Hansen 

Born: 30 Dec 1966, Corvallis, Benton, Oregon 
Died: Living 



Jonathan Kirk Hansen 

Born: 7 Dec 1970, Lincoln, Lancaster, Nebraska 
Died: Living 



Amy Elizabeth Hansen 

Born: 28 June 1974, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, 
Utah 



Haley Rae Hansen 

Born: 21 Jul 1965, Portland, Multnomah, Oregon 
Died: Living 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) and Gary David Hansen 



BONNIE RAE HUBBARD 



1937 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard 
born August 3, 1937. 



Born on August 3, 1937, Bonnie Rae Hubbard is the second 
child of Amy Pearl Madsen and Emmett Hubbard. She was 
delivered by Doctor Guyette at her parent's home at 673 East 
College Street in Idaho Falls, Bonneville County, Idaho. 



Bonnie Rae. 
(Child, Amy P., 1960) 



Letter to Bonnie Rae. 
(Child, Amy M., Undated) 




Amy Pearl and Bonnie Rae Hubbard. 

Circa 1937. 



(Amy) "It was a warm summer day in August. I was among the 
flowers listening to a sweet bird when I suddenly felt a sharp 
pain and I knew my baby was on the way. I called to Elvin, 
who was playing in the sand nearby. He could see his mother 
needed him and he jumped up from his play and ran down the 
path to the Stibbs store to call his grandmother home from 
work." 

(Amy) "When you were born, the doctor handed you to Mama 
(Mary Madsen) and I looked up and said, 'How is she, Mama?' 
and she said, 'Just beautiful. ' Then she carried you so gently 
into the kitchen and cleaned you up and dressed you in one of 
the cute little nightgowns I had ready. She wrapped you in one 
of the pretty receiving blankets she had crocheted on and 
cradled you in her arms and kissed you. Then she brought you 
to me and placed you in my arms. Even though it's been many 
years now, I still treasure this memory. 

"I remember when you were three days old, you were crying 
and suddenly you just stopped. Mama walked over to you and 
you weren't breathing. I saw Mama rubbing you very hard and 
breathing in your mouth. I sat up in bed and asked what was 
wrong. She said you had stopped breathing. She worked with 
you for a couple of minutes and you started breathing again. 
You were a gray color, but it never happened again. Mama 
saved your life that day. She may not have had a good 
education, but she was very smart when it came to healing 
people." 

Bonnie had the good fortune to live just across the street from 
her maternal grandmother, Mary Madsen. Bonnie and her 



223 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



brother and sisters (Elvin, Jeanice, and Shirley) spent many 
hours with their grandmother and, on many nights, they slept at 
their grandmother's home. 




Bonnie Rae Hubbard 
at about age one. 

A Christmas Gift. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard 
born January 14, 1941. 

Japan bombed Pearl Harbor 

December 7, 1941. U.S. declared 

war on Japan. 



(Amy) "By the time Bonnie was less than one year old she 
walked and climbed on everything. One day we left a ladder 
against the house and when I went out, Bonnie had climbed the 
ladder and was on the roof. Another time I found her on the 
fridge. She was always on the table or cupboard. She was such 
an active little girl. Bonnie was always obedient, pleasant, 
beautiful, and talented." 

(Connie) "Little three-year-old Bonnie Rae Hubbard lived just 
across the street from her grandmother Mary and loved her very 
much. When it came time to buy Christmas gifts, Bonnie 
worried and shopped (with the help of her mama) until she 
found the perfect gift: a miniature telephone filled with 
perfume. (It was in the shape of the telephones of that era, a 
standup phone with a speaker at the top.) As Christmas drew 
near, Bonnie's excitement over presenting her grandmother with 
this gift intensified. Finally, Christmas Eve arrived and it was 
time for Grandma Mary to open her gift. Bonnie watched 
closely as her grandmother began unwrapping the little present. 
With each movement, Bonnie became even more excited until 
the little three year old stiffened and passed out." 

On January 14, 1941, a new little sister came into the home 
whom they named Connie LaRaine. 

Bonnie had the ill fortune to have her parent's marriage end in 
divorce. Her mother then found employment at a small cafe in 
Idaho Falls where she worked the night shift. Grandma Mary 
stayed with the children while their mother was away. 

On July 17, 1943, Bonnie's beloved grandmother kissed her 
goodbye and left to attend the Madsen family reunion in 
St. Anthony, Idaho. It was held on Sunday, July 18, at the St. 
Anthony City park. 



224 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) and Gary David Hansen 



Mary Madsen, Nell Madsen Standen, 

Thelma Standen, and 

Sandra Standen drowned 

July 19, 1943. 



Following the reunion, Grandma Mary and her daughter Nell, 
son-in-law George, grandson Bill, and his wife and daughter, 
Thelma and Sandra, stayed the night with Amy's sister, Lavina. 
On July 19, they drove to Island Park Reservoir to fish for the 
day. The boat developed a slow leak and all were lost except 
George Standen and his son, Bill. Grandmother Mary suffered 
a heart attack, but Nell, Thelma, and Sandra drowned in the 10- 
to 20-foot lake. 



Times were very difficult during Bonnie's early childhood 
years. Enforced rationing as a result of the war effort made it 
more challenging for the family. Many of the daily staples were 
in short supply and parents were very careful to not waste one 
morsel of food. 



Memories of My Sister Bonnie Rae 

Hubbard Hansen. 

(Martin, Connie H., 2004) 




Bonnie Rae riding the family 
pet calf. Circa 1945. 

A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Connie) "When Bonnie was younger, she developed a talent for 
problem solving that was 'Cracker Jack,' as they said in the old 
days. On one occasion, Mom gave me a 'Toni' home 
permanent. I had long dark hair, which hung to the middle of 
my back. Mom used those little wacky tobacco-type papers and 
small curlers and wound my hair right to my scalp. She applied 
liberal amounts of curling solution and then left it on about three 
times longer than the allotted time. The outcome would have 
made Don King look good. My hair was a frizzy mess. Bonnie 
got a pair of scissors and cut my hair, filling a bushel basket to 
the brim. This took an extended period of time. Then she styled 
my new short hair in a very attractive fashion." 

(Amy) "Bonnie loved to be outside. I remember one time we 
bought a big white cow at the auction and she had the biggest 
calf I had ever seen. Harold and I could not milk this cow. She 
kicked. Finally, Harold tied up her hind legs with a rope and 
little Bonnie Rae milked that cow every night and morning 
before she went to school. That cow gave about 10 gallons of 
milk. Bonnie also helped in the home. 



"When Terry was born on August 22, 1946, Bonnie became like 
a second mother to him. She always held his little hand. There 



225 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



was no way he could get lost with Bonnie around. I could 
always trust her to watch him, no matter where they were. 




Bonnie Rae in her 

band uniform. 

Circa 1953. 




Bonnie Rae about the time of her high 
school graduation. 



"When Terry was about 22 months old, I let him sleep with 
Bonnie. She usually slept with her little arm under his head. 
When he wanted his bottle he would tell her and I could hear 
Bonnie's little feet hit the floor as she ran to the fridge to get his 
bottle and we heard no more till morning. 

"Bonnie was a very talented girl and used some of that talent to 
become a cheer leader during her elementary and high school 
years. She was on the honor roll in high school and also 
participated in the band program where she played clarinet. She 
played with the Firth High School Band and with several 
ensembles. Bonnie was very popular during her school years 
due to her personal dynamics and this, plus her many extra- 
curricular activities, created a great deal of stress in her life as 
she worked to balance all the demands on her time. However, 
Bonnie still found time for hard work. She was always willing 
to roll up her sleeves and pitch in no matter how mundane the 
task. She helped milk the cows on the farm and practiced 
singing at the same time. She also worked away from home 
picking potatoes in the fall and cutting seed potatoes in the 
spring. She also tended children, cleaned houses, and worked 
at Joe's Food Store in Shelley. 

"In September 1954, Bonnie was an attendant on 'Spud Day.' 
She looked so beautiful in her red formal. Her song for that day 
was a Teresa Brewer hit called, 'Too Young to Tango.' Bonnie 
received thunderous applause for this performance. 

Bonnie met Gary Hansen in grade school after the family moved 
to Goshen. 



226 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) and Gary David Hansen 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 




Gary David Hansen, 
17 years of age. 



(Amy) "Following graduation from high school, Bonnie 
enrolled at Utah State University at Logan, Utah, where she 
continued as a cheer leader for the first year. Gary also attended 
Utah State and before the year was up, Gary proposed to 
Bonnie." 

GARY DAVID HANSEN 

(Bonnie) "Gary David Hansen was born in Logan, Utah, on 
November 1, 1936. He was the son of Lucille Smith and 
Ammon Melvin Hansen. His siblings included two brothers and 
one sister: Robert, Charles, and Marilyn. Gary was raised on 
a farm just east of Firth, Idaho, where he worked during his 
growing-up years. 

"Gary was a good student and, while at Firth High School, he 
held several offices including student body president. He 
played football and was captain of the basketball team. 
Following graduation from high school, he attended college at 
the Agricultural College (now Utah State University) in Logan, 
Utah." 




Bonnie Rae Hubbard married 
Gary David Hansen August 3, 1956. 



BONNIE RAE HUBBARD AND GARY DAVID HANSEN 

On August 3, 1956, Bonnie's 19th birthday, she married Gary 
David Hansen in the Idaho Falls Temple. Following their 
marriage, they settled in Logan, Utah, where Gary continued 
his education and Bonnie worked as a secretary at the student 
union building. Their first child, Debbie Kaye, was born May 
9, 1957, at Logan, Cache County, Utah. 

Gary completed his Bachelor's degree in Sociology and he and 
Bonnie moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he completed 
his Master's degree University of Minnesota. 

Kelley David was born December 28, 1961, in Minneapolis, 
Hennepin, Minnesota. 



227 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Kelley David Hansen 
born December 28, 1961. 



Lori Gay Hansen 
born February 19, 1964. 

Haley Rae Hansen 
born July 21, 1965. 

Starlee Jill Hansen 
born December 30, 1966. 

A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



Bonnie and Gary again moved with their little children to 
Lansing, Michigan, where Gary worked for The Commission on 
Aging. After two years, they moved to Oregon where Gary 
worked at Mount Angel College as a teaching assistant and at 
Benedictine Nursing Home as an administrator. He had 
completed most of the requirements for his Ph.D. while they 
were living in Michigan, but he completed this degree at Oregon 
State University in Corvallis. 

Bonnie and Gary added three more children to their family 
while they were living in Oregon: Lori Gay was born 
February 19, 1964, in Oregon City, Clackamas County, Oregon; 
Haley Rae was born July 21, 1965, in Portland, Multnomah 
County, Oregon; Starlee Jill was born December 30, 1966, in 
Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon. 

(Amy) "Terry and I drove to Oregon to spend Thanksgiving 
with Bonnie and Gary. We are so proud of what they have been 
able to accomplish." 



Jonathan Kirk Hansen 
born December 7, 1970. 



In June 1970, Bonnie and Gary moved to Nebraska, where Gary 
was offered a teaching position. It was here Jonathan (Jon) Kirk 
was born December 7, 1970, in Lincoln, Lancaster County, 
Nebraska. 



Bonnie and Gary were finally able to move closer to home when 
he was offered a teaching position at Brigham Young 
University. In June 1971, they moved to Provo, Utah. 



Amy Elizabeth Hansen 
born June 28, 1974. 



Amy Elizabeth (Lizi) was born June 28, 1974, in Salt Lake City, 
Salt Lake County, Utah. 



Letter to Connie and Richard Martin. 
(Child, Amy M., 1988) 



(Amy) "While I was at Bonnie's, Jon's boss asked him and 
Jason to drive to Las Vegas and pick up a hot tub. These boys 
are only 17 and Bonnie wasn't very happy about the prospect 
but decided she had to let him grow up. Jon couldn't find his 
wallet and I kept thinking maybe he wouldn't find it and would 
just have to stay home. It was in his suit pants. Jason was there 



228 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) and Gary David Hansen 




Bonnie, Amy, and Shirley 
at the temple. 



waiting for Jon, but Bonnie suggested we kneel in prayer and 
ask for their safety. We did just that, then we kissed them both, 
and they were off. 

"They called that night from Lake Powell where they were 
staying. They traveled on the next day with Jason driving and 
Jon trying to adjust the tape deck. He was having trouble so 
Jason tried to drive and help. Jason lost control of the car, it 
went over the median right into oncoming traffic. There was a 
big truck towing a boat heading right for them but the boys car 
glanced off the side of the truck and hit the boat. It knocked the 
car sky-high clear into the field. The boys were shaken and 
bruised. The cops came and said they were within 10 seconds 
of dying in a head-on collision. Bonnie and I agree it was the 
power of prayer that saved their lives." 



Memories of My Sister Bonnie Rae 

Hubbard Hansen. 

(Martin, Connie H., 2004) 




(Connie) "Bonnie has a heart that is very tender, sweet, and 
filled with love, compassion, and mercy. She has always been 
loving, nurturing, and gentle with those around her. She was 
blessed with bright intellect and an industrious and willing 
spirit. If Bonnie is turned away from entering the Holy City, 
then I will say, 'Let's just go, for what chance do we have if she 
has missed the mark?'' 

"I believe the following poem, which I wrote for Bonnie's 
birthday on August 3, 1994, captures the essence of her 
character. 



Bonnie and Gary Hansen at his 
50 th Class Reunion at Firth. 



FROM GOD'S GARDEN 

Connie L. Martin 



God tenderly plucked from his loveliest garden 

A beautiful flower of great worth 

To gladden the dismal and fallen earth. 

The flower budded and blossomed in spite 
Of the mighty barbs it was among. 



229 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



^4, 



■^ ■ ' 




Bonnie Rae Hubbard 
taken when she was in school. 



"I'll keep my beauty and add measure, 
Serving others is my pleasure," 
her gentle heart sung. 

Her talents, love, and innate goodness 
Overshadows and adorns 
Life's many sharp and 
Merciless thorns. 

The fragrance and beauty of this flower 
To the presence of God directs the way. 
God tenderly plucked from his loveliest garden 
A flower he calls Bonnie Rae, 

And richly blest this world 

Which we call Earth. 

God tenderly plucked from his loveliest garden 

A beautiful flower of great and noble worth." 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M, 1971) 




^Pfc**^- 



) 



VlRTtri 



(Jary David Hansen, age 13. 



(Amy) "Bonnie has bright blue eyes and blond hair, which she 
keeps well groomed. She is happy, loving, willing to serve 
others. She is a good cook and spends many hours in her 
kitchen making cakes, pies, bread, cinnamon rolls, salads, and 
other delectable dishes. Bonnie prepares food for her neighbors 
if she feels a concern or knows of particular needs. 

"She is a very good mother to her seven children. She loves 
them dearly and has raised them the best she could. As mother 
and daughter, Bonnie and I have a good relationship." 

Gary worked for 12 years as Chairman of the Department of 
Family Resource Management at Brigham Young University. 
He then branched out into the field of financial planning and 
insurance sales. He worked for Prudential, Beneficial, Lincoln 
National, and started his own business called Consolidated 
Planning Group. 



230 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) and Gary David Hansen 




Gary with his mother, Lucille Smith 
Hansen, at his wedding to Bonnie Rae. 




Four generation picture: back, L to R: 

Katie, Debbie, Bonnie, 

Aubrie, and Amy. 

Front, L to R: Ashlee and Rick. 



He also worked for a law firm in California for several years. 
He was the administrator for nursing homes in Lexington, 
Kentucky, and Oregon. Gary is now retired and helping Jon 
build a cabin in the Uinta Mountains. Gary has held many 
positions in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 
including bishop at BYU. He and Bonnie have successfully 
completed a 38-month service mission at the Conference Center 
in Salt Lake City where they hosted tours for groups from all 
around the world. It was a wonderful experience for which they 
will always be grateful. Presently, Gary is in the High Priests 
Group in the Edgemont 14 th Ward where they have lived since 
1978. 

Bonnie has been the Compassionate Service Leader in Relief 
Society for the past six years. She has held many other callings 
through the years. Bonnie's greatest pleasure in life, however, 
is her children and grandchildren. Her favorite saying is: "I'll 
love you forever, I'll like you for always, as long as I'm living 
(and long after I 'm gone) my baby you '11 be. " 

Bonnie and Gary will celebrate their 50 th wedding anniversary 
in 2006. They have the following children and grandchildren: 

Debbie Kaye Hansen was born May 9, 1957, at Logan, Cache 
County, Utah. Debbie was active in choir in high school and 
excelled on the piano. She attended Brigham Young University 
where she was a member of Footprints for Freedom. It was here 
she met Richard W. West. He was an officer in the U.S. Air 
Force and he and Debbie lived in many different places 
including three years in Germany. They were later divorced. 
Debbie was a manager for Sears for approximately 15 years. 
Debbie has the following children: 



Richard Joseph West was born November 16, 1977, in 
Hampton, Virginia. Rick is married to Jody, an industrious, 
lovely young lady. 



231 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Debbie Hansen West with (clockwise) 
Rick, Aubrie, Katie, and Ashlee. 



Rick joined the U.S. Marine Corp and served eight months 
in Iraq. He is currently stationed at Lawton, Oklahoma. 

Ashlee Elizabeth West was born June 27, 1979, in Hampton, 
Virginia. She attended the University of Tennessee where 
she studied nursing and supported herself. In May 2005, 
she graduated with a Bachelor of Nursing degree. She is 
currently employed at the University of Tennessee Medical 
Center. She is a lovely, talented lady. 

Aubrianne Kaye West was born February 4, 1983, in 
Wichita, Kansas. She graduated from high school in 
Tennessee and then cosmetology school. She worked and 
lived on her own. She currently lives with her father in 
Melbourne, Florida, where she is attending computer 
school. 



Kathlyn Klis West was born January 18, 1984, in Wichita, 
Kansas. She is currently completing her last year in 
Education Administration at the University of Tennessee. 
On June 11, 2005, she married Richard Bull, whom she met 
at church. Richard is also attending school and working. 




Kelley, Kris, Jake, Colton (back row). 
Hunter and Ryan in front. 



Kelley David Hansen was born December 28, 1961, in 
Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota. Kelley attended BYU and 
served a mission to Raleigh, North Carolina. He married 
Kristyn Arnold on August 12, 1983, in the Salt Lake Temple. 
Kris also graduated from BYU. Kelley is very successful in 
business in the Salt Lake area and Kris has worked for Delta 
Airlines for 20 years. They are both active in the church and 
ride four-wheeled sports vehicles and motorcycles as a family 
sport. They are the parents of four boys, all born in Salt Lake 
City, Utah: 



Colton Kirk Hansen was born January 16, 1989. He is very 
athletic and plays football, lacrosse, and soccer. 



232 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) and Gary David Hansen 



Jake Christopher Hansen, born April 19, 1992, is also very 
athletic and plays football, lacrosse, and soccer. 

Hunter Clark Hansen, born November 16, 1994, is also 
very athletic and plays football, lacrosse, and soccer. 

Ryan Kelley Hansen was born March 16, 1998, and is 
following in his brother's footsteps and playing sports. 




Lori Bird with her husband, 

Steve, and son Jantzen. 

Back row, L to R: 

Jameson and Cassandra. 




Cassandra Bird with Grandma Amy. 



Lori Gay Hansen was born February 19, 1964, in Oregon City, 
Clackamas County, Oregon. Lori Gay graduated from 
Timpview High School, where she was active in drama and 
participated in several plays. She also attended the Academy of 
Hair Design. Lori and Stephen William Bird were married on 
October 7, 1983, in the Salt Lake Temple. Steve attended BYU 
on a swim scholarship. He works for Southwest Airlines and is 
stationed in Los Angeles, California. He commutes to his work. 
Lori was recently diagnosed with thyroid cancer and is 
undergoing treatments. They are the parents of three children, 
all born in Provo, Utah County, Utah: 

Cassandra Nicole Bird was born December 6, 1984. On 
June 30, 2005, Cassandra married Christopher Peterson. 
She works as a dental assistant for Dr. Corbin Matthews. 
Chris works for a freight company and is working on his 
degree. 

Jameson Stephen Bird was born March 25, 1989. He likes 
to ride motorcycles and plays lacrosse with his team at 
Timpview High School. 



Jantzen Ryker Bird was born July 6, 2000. He is five years 
old and loves to play with his cousins, whom he calls his 
"kids." 

Haley Rae Hansen was born July 21, 1965, in Portland, 
Multnomah County, Oregon. She graduated from Timpview 
High School and cum laude from BYU. Haley served a mission 



233 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



to Oslo, Norway. On July 30, 1988, she married James Brad 
Peacock in the Provo Temple. Brad also graduated from BYU 
and went on to complete a Master's degree. He served a 
mission to Holland. They live in South Jordan, Utah, and are 
the parents of five children: 




Back row, L to R: Jordan, Jocelyn, 

and Jackson. Front row, L to R: 

Jason, Brad, Quade and Haley 

Peacock. 



Jocelyn Rae Peacock was born January 1 8, 1990, in Provo, 
Utah. Jocelyn is an honor student at high school and a 
talented cellist. She practices every day and is much loved. 

Jordan Brad Peacock was born August 11, 1992, in Provo, 
Utah. He is also an honor student attending a junior high 
school for high achievers. He plays piano and is gentle and 
kind. 

Jackson Blake (J ax) Peacock was born November 9, 1994, 
in Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona. Is a multi-talented 
child who is friendly and helpful. 




Starlee and her three children: 
Collin, Bianca, and Mason. 



Jason Brock Peacock was born August 18, 1997, in Orem, 
Utah County, Utah. Jason will be baptized in September 
2005. He loves his little brother and watches over him. 

Jansen Quade Peacock was born July 2, 2003, in Murray, 
Salt Lake County, Utah. He is just starting to talk, runs 
everywhere, and is the joy of his home. 

Starlee Jill Hansen was born December 30, 1966, in Corvallis, 
Benton County, Oregon. Starlee studied dance while she was in 
high school and became an accomplished dogger. She also has 
a beautiful singing voice. She used these talents to win 
Ms. Provo and, later, Mrs. Salt Lake County. She was married 
and divorced. She is engaged to marry Rick Cantrell. Starlee 
has three children: 



234 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) and Gary David Hansen 



Collin McCray Boddy was born May 1, 1988, in West 
Valley, Salt Lake County, Utah. Collin attends high school 
and worked for the summer in Farmington, Utah, where he 
lives with his father. 

Mason Kendrick Boddy was born June 4, 1991, in West 
Valley, Salt Lake County, Utah. Mason also lives in 
Farmington where he plays football at his high school. He 
is a good student. 

Bianca Jill Ley was born August 16, 1995, in Salt Lake 
City, Utah. She is a happy 10-year old who lives with her 
mom and travels to Florida to visit her father and older 
brother. 




Amelie and Jon Hansen, 

holding Brenna. 

Front: Amanda and Chase. 



Jonathan (Jon) Kirk Hansen was born December 7, 1970, in 
Lincoln, Lancaster County, Nebraska. Jon attended BYU, 
Northwestern Law School, and Kellogg School of Business in 
Chicago, Illinois. He is the CEO of Mstar.net and a partner in 
Chicago Venture Group. On October 6, 1994, he married 
Amelie Jo Wood in the Salt Lake Temple. Amalie graduated 
from BYU on the same day as Jon and gave birth to their first 
child the next night. They are the parents of the following 
children: 

Jonathan Chase Hansen was born April 28, 1996, in Provo, 
Utah. Jonathan Chase is only nine but an experienced rider 
on the family's dirt bike. He loves to ride in the Uinta 
Mountains where they are building a cabin. 



Amanda Jo Hansen was born February 25, 2000, in Aurora, 
Illinois. She is beautiful like her mom and has a very good 
singing voice. She has performed at wedding receptions for 
some of her uncles and aunts. 



235 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Brenna Nicole Hansen was born November 30, 2002. She 
has blonde, curly hair and big eyes. She looks like her 
daddy and likes to follow him everywhere he goes. 




Lizi and husband, Corbin, 
with daughters, Shaylen and Gracyn. 



Amy Elizabeth (Lizi) Hansen was born June 28, 1974, in Salt 
Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. On February 13, 1993, she 
married Corbin Gary Matthews in the Provo Temple. She 
graduated from Bon Losee School of Hair Design and worked 
in Lexington, Kentucky, for four years while her husband 
attended college. Corbin graduated with honors from dental 
school in Lexington, and opened Cougar Dental in Provo. They 
are the parents of two daughters: 

Shaylen Rae Matthews was born April 20, 1995, in Provo, 
Utah. She has dark hair and brown eyes like her daddy. 
She is in fifth grade. 

Gracyn Elizabeth Matthews was born June 27, 2000, in 
Provo, Utah County, Utah. She has beautiful, curly hair 
and blue eyes. She is currently in kindergarten. 



River Corbin Matthews is due about November 1, 2005. 



236 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) and Gary David Hansen 




The Hubbard girls (above), Shirley 
Jean, Bonnie Rae, and Connie LaRaine, 
and (right) with their father, Emmett 
Hubbard. Circa 1941. Courtesy 
Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



237 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Bonnie Rae (above left) practicing her 

acrobatic skills. She later used her talent to 

become a cheer leader in high school and 

college. Circa 1946. Shown at upper right are Bonnie and Gary's sons, Jon and Kelley. Shown 

below are Bonnie and Gary's five daughters, L to R: Lizi, Haley, Starlee, Debbie, and Lori. All 

courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 




238 



Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) and Gary David Hansen 




Bonnie Rae Hansen (left) with 
three of her daughters, L to R: 
Amy Elizabeth Hansen 
Matthews, Lori Gay Hansen 
Bird, Bonnie Rae Hubbard 
Hansen, and Haley Rae Hansen 
Peacock. Circa 2003. 
Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 




The Hansen family (above) taken in 1991, includes the children and grandchildren of Bonnie Rae 
and Gary David Hansen. Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



239 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Hansen family portrait taken in 1991. Back row, L to R: Lori Gay, Gary David, Bonnie Rae, Kelley 
David, and Haley Rae. Front row, L to R: Debbie Kaye, Jonathan Kirk, Starlee Jill, and Amy 
Elizabeth. Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



240 



Chapter 12 
CONNIE LARAINE HUBBARD 

AND 
RICHARD BRUCE MARTIN 




Back, L to R: Heidi LaRaine, Connie LaRaine, Valerie Kim, Richard Todd, and 
Richard Bruce. Front, L to R: Holly Beth and Troy Bruce Martin. 



Information for this chapter provided 

by Connie LaRaine Martin. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Amy Pearl Madsen 

Born: 4 Aug 1912, Cache, Fremont, Idaho 
Died: 1 9 Jul 2002, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 


v 



Married: Emmett Noel Hubbard 

Born: 9 Feb 1905, Centertown, Ohio, Kentucky 
Died: 29 Sep 1973, Riverside, Orange, California 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard 

Born: 14 Jan 1 941 , Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Richard Bruce Martin 

Born: 8 Apr 1933, Sharon, Mercer, Pennsylvania 
Died: Living 



Heidi LaRaine Martin 

Born: 9 Jan 1961, Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Richard Todd Martin 

Born: 14 Jun 1962, Boise, Ada, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Valerie Kim Martin 

Born: 29 Jan 1965, Burley, Cassia, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Holly Beth Martin 

Born: 24 Jan 1967, Yuma, Yuma, Arizona 
Died: Living 



Troy Bruce Martin 

Bom: 1 May 1968, Yuma, Yuma, Arizona 
Died: Living 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) and Richard Bruce Martin 



1941 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard 
born January 14, 1941. 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 

U.S. at war with Germany. 



CONNIE LARAINE HUBBARD 

At the time of her birth, Connie's family lived in Idaho Falls, 
Idaho, across the street from her grandmother, Mary Madsen. 
Grandma Mary was very involved in the lives of her children 
and grandchildren and recorded much of her activities in her 
diaries. Only the diary for 1941 has been preserved and some 
excerpts are included below: 

(Mary) Wednesday, January 15, 1941: "Amy had a baby 
girl. " 



Wednesday, January 22: "Amy came home from the hospital 
today at noon in a taxi. She looks bad. Kids sure was glad to 
see her. Elvin and Shirley slept with me tonight. Is snowing 
and melting.''' 1 



U.S. declared war on Japan 
December 8, 1941. World War II. 

Articles and e-mails. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003a) 




'(>. v 






/ 



Amy Pearl holding Connie. 
Circa 1941. 



Connie LaRaine was the fifth child born to this family. Her 
brothers and sisters include: Elvin Wesley Goodson, born 
July 3, 1930; Amy Jeanice Goodson, born December 14, 1931; 
Shirley Jean Hubbard, born January 6, 1936; Bonnie Rae 
Hubbard, born August 3, 1937; and Harold Terry Child, born 
August 22, 1946. Her parents were Emmett Noel and Amy 
Pearl Madsen Hubbard. 

(Connie) "One of my earliest memories is when I was 1 1 
months old. I remember sitting in my highchair. I can still see 
the light bulb hanging down from the ceiling and I remember 
my mom feeding me biscuits broken into little pieces. She was 
very upset and listening to the radio. I was too young to 
understand any of it. Years later when I recited this memory to 
Mom, she was amazed that I could remember anything from that 
early an age. She told me about the United States going to war 
against Japan." 

On July 17, 1943, Bonnie's beloved grandmother kissed her 
goodbye and left to attend the Madsen family reunion in 
St. Anthony, Idaho. It was held on Sunday, July 18, at the St. 



243 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Mary Madsen, Nell Standen, Thelma 

Standen, and Sandra drowned 

July 19, 1943. 

Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., and Richard, 2005) 




\£ ■ .'*J'i ■'' '■ '-' '■ * ■ 




Connie LaRaine at about six 
months of age. Circa 1941. 

A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



Anthony City park. Following the reunion, Grandma Mary and 
her daughter Nell, son-in-law George, grandson Bill, and his 
wife and daughter, Thelma and Sandra, stayed the night with 
Amy's sister, Lavina. On July 19, they drove to Island Park 
Reservoir to fish for the day. The boat developed a slow leak 
and all were lost except George Standen and his son, Bill. 
Grandmother Mary suffered a heart attack, but Nell, Thelma, 
and Sandra drowned in the 10- to 20-foot lake. 

(Connie) "I remember some of the events from Grandma 
Madsen's funeral. I was about two at the time and wanted to 
stand up on the bench and wave and blow kisses to all the 
people sitting behind me. Mama kept turning me around and 
making me sit down. It wasn't too long after that Mama and 
Dad split up." 

(Amy) "Connie was such a pretty baby. And I never remember 
her complaining. She took what there was, even if it was the 
crumbs. She loved animals. She once had a little lamb. She 
loved it so much she would have slept with it if we'd let her. 
She also had a little dog she named Robin. She and that dog 
were rarely out of each other's sight. She had it until she got 
married. 



"Connie has always been very religious. When I was Primary 
President, she helped me. Then when I was organist, Connie 
was chorister. We also taught classes together. Connie is 
humble but also very entertaining. She can sing funny songs, 
church hymns, or whatever the setting requires." 



E-mail Message. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003) 



(Connie) "While my mom was dating Harold Child, I called him 
Uncle Harold. I recall my mother asking me if she could marry 
Uncle Harold. I was just three years old, but I remember 
adopting a pensive look as I considered her request. I pooched 
my little lips out and tapped them with my right pointer finger. 
Then I quickly asked, 'Will you bring me something home?' 



244 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) and Richard Bruce Martin 



Amy Pearl married Harold Thomas 
Child March 22, 1944. 

Harold Terry Child 
born August 22, 1946. 




Connie LaRaine at about age two. 

Remnants of H Terry Child's 

'Tapestry of Life.' 

(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 



"She smiled and said l YesV I said, 'Okay, you can marry him. ' 
Recalling this brings a smile to my lips. It was a very large 
decision for such a small person. Had I known then what I 
know now about the responsibility that is an automatic 
companion to power, I would have shrunk from it like a wool 
swim suit in a hot tub. 

"Mom and Harold traveled to Dillon, Montana, where they were 
married. Harold was very good to me. He was a good man, and 
I loved him dearly." 

(Connie) "When I was four years old, I had a very strong desire 
for my mom to bring home a new little baby. I remember telling 
her to get really fat, get really sick, and go somewhere and get 
us a baby. One early morning when I was five, she woke me up. 
She was standing over me in her red bathrobe trimmed in navy 
blue and told me she was going to get us a new baby. It was 
August 22, 1946. Later, when I learned we had a new baby 
brother, I was happy enough, but what really excited me was the 
prospect of spending 10 days with Aunt Ruby. At the end of the 
10 days, Aunt Ruby brought me home. I was glad to be home 
because on Saturday it was matinee at the Virginia Theater. I 
was excited as I ran in the house. 

"I took a quick look at my new brother. Yes, he was cute. Then 
something terrible happened. My mother told Shirley, Bonnie, 
and me we would not be going to the matinee that day. Well, it 
didn't matter to me that Mama had just gotten home from 
Eaton's Maternity Home in Shelley. I threw such a temper 
tantrum! Instead of a spanking as I deserved, my mother gave 
in and we went to the matinee! 

"Terry was such a sweet, cherubic baby and I very soon fell in 
love with him. When he was about eight months old, we moved 
to our little 40-acre farm in Goshen. That summer, I took a 
good look at Terry and wondered what he would look like as an 
Indian warrior. I got the food coloring from the kitchen and 
streaked it all over his sweet little face. He didn't look so good. 



245 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



I tried my six-year-old best to wash it off but water wasn't 
taking it off very well. So, I decided to get some gasoline! 
Thankfully my mama figured out what we were up to just in 
time. I thought maybe she would join the warpath when she 
saw what I'd done to her baby, but she just laughed and cleaned 
him up." 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M, 1971) 



(Amy) "Terry loved all his sisters but his favorite was Connie. 
They were the youngest of the family and closer in age. You 
rarely saw one without the other. Terry loved to tease Connie. 
She got mad as hops at him, but it never lasted long." 



Articles and E-mails. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003a) 




Shirley Jean (back) with Connie 

LaRaine (left) and Bonnie Rae (right) 

each holding one of Terry's hands. 

Circa 1949. 



(Connie) "We lived on our family's little 40-acre farm in rural 
Goshen, Idaho, for several years. Our small farm house had two 
bedrooms and located in one of these bedrooms was a walk-in 
closet. The moonlight shining through the tiny window in this 
bedroom served as a night light. One night, when I was seven 
or eight years old, I had what reminds me today of a precursor 
to the 'Chuckie Doll' horror films. I was in my nightgown and 
wandered into the walk-in closet. As I emerged, I saw what 
appeared to me to be an angel all dressed in white. This 
frightened me to the core of my little frame and I started 
screaming. My little fists went into action like they were 
connected to a diesel motor. I pounded and scratched at that 
angel, but the angel began screaming and pounding right back. 
That angel could fight very well. Someone in the family heard 
the upheaval coming from the bedroom and rushed in to turn on 
the light. To my astonishment and relief, my 'angel' turned out 
to be my horrified and shocked mother. She had not seen me 
enter the bedroom and was as frightened as I was to find a little 
white figure emerging from the closet. Her nightgown needed 
some repair work following that incident. She and I laughed a 
great deal over this little story as the years went by. 



246 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) and Richard Bruce Martin 




Connie LaRaine Hubbard. 
Circa 1949. 




<i 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard 
in high school. 



"My mother always planted a huge garden in the summer, but 
the summer that I was eight, she decided to plant some 
watermelon seeds. This was her maiden voyage, as far as I 
know, at planting watermelon. With focused anticipation, we 
watched the garden grow throughout the summer and 
anticipated eating a homegrown watermelon right there in 
Goshen. We were all delighted to see the watermelon seeds 
sprout and plants begin to grow. 

"One lone watermelon formed within the plentiful watermelon 
vines and we watched it carefully. Being the only watermelon, 
it never lacked for company as we watered and tended it. Our 
mouths were watering as we imagined how sweet that well- 
developed, beautiful, healthy melon would taste. Finally one 
Sunday, our mother announced the time had come; we would eat 
the fruit of our labors. We carefully picked the melon and 
brought it in to cut. Much to our disappointment, one whack 
with the knife revealed the dark secret hidden within that 
beautiful skin. Our watermelon was a squash! Yes, they do 
cross-pollinate. What did it taste like? We'll never know since 
we threw the whole thing out. 

"My brother, Elvin, joined the Air Force when he graduated 
from high school. I'll never forget when he came home for a 
visit and brought me a beautiful story-book doll to add to my 
collection. 

"During the 1950s, when I was 13 years old, Uncle Johnnie 
bought me a pink sweater and grey poodle skirt. He was such 
a kind and loving man. He was always very good to me. 

"During the summer of 1956 when I was 15 years old, I was 
called by Bishop Dermont Ricks to serve as Primary Chorister 
in the Goshen Ward. My mother was the Primary Organist at 
that time. We spent an appreciable amount of time practicing 
together at home to learn all the Primary songs. At that time, 
many of the new Primary songs were first introduced in the 
Children 's Friend Magazine, and I was excited to learn such 



247 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



songs as '/ am a Child of God'' and 'Popcorn Popping On The 
Apricot Tree.'' I loved all the songs from the Primary Song 
Book, but these two were especially dear to me. I served in the 
Primary until the summer of 1959, following my graduation 
from High School. A few years ago, my little granddaughter, 
Krista, who was then about six years old, was visiting with her 
family from Illinois. Krista and I were standing by our apricot 
tree in the backyard. I began singing, 'Popcorn Popping On 
The Apricot Tree.' With amazement in her voice, Krista said, 
'Grandma, I didn 't know you knew that song. How long have 
you known how to sing that?' With melancholy, I whispered to 
myself, 'Longer than you can know.' Together our voices 
blended and we sang this wonderful, nostalgic song through 
several times." 



Memories of My Sister Bonnie Rae 

Hubbard Hansen. 

(Martin, Connie H., 2004) 



(Connie) "When my sister, Bonnie, was younger, she developed 
a talent for problem solving that was 'Cracker Jack,' as they 
said in the old days. On one occasion, Mom gave me a Toni' 
home permanent. I had long dark hair, which hung to the 
middle of my back. Mom used those little wacky tobacco-type 
papers and small curlers and wound my hair right to my scalp. 
She applied liberal amounts of curling solution and then left it 
on about three times longer than the allotted time. The outcome 
would have made Don King look good. My hair was a frizzy 
mess. Bonnie got a pair of scissors and cut my hair, filling a 
bushel basket to the brim. Then she styled my new short hair in 
a very attractive fashion. 



"I met Richard Bruce Martin when he came to teach music at 
my high school the year I was a senior, but he waited until after 
I graduated before he let me know he was interested in me." 

RICHARD BRUCE MARTIN 



Richard B. Martin, Brief Life Sketch." 
(Martin, Connie H., 2004) 



(Connie) "Richard Bruce Martin was born before the doctor 
could arrive at his parent's home in Sharon, Mercer County, 
Pennsylvania, on April 8, 1933. His parents were Thomas 



248 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) and Richard Bruce Martin 



> - - - - ■<-.- 




Richard and his brothers with 

the Soap Box Derby car he built. 

Circa 1945. 



Arthur and Sara Emily Richards Martin. Richard had a sister , 
Nancy, and two brothers, Robert and Jerry. 

"In 1929, Richard's maternal grandfather died leaving his 
grandmother, Iva, age 42, alone. She came to live with her 
daughter and son-in-law. Richard has many fond memories of 
Grandmother Iva. He says it was like growing up with two 
wonderful mothers. 

"When Richard was two and one-half years old, his mother gave 
birth to a second son whom they named Robert. Richard loved 
his little brother, but one day, he decided he did not like his little 
brothers head full of beautiful curls. So he cut them all off. He 
explained to his mother that he didn't want his baby brother to 
be a sissy. 



"Richard grew up in Brookfield, Ohio, and many of his fondest 
memories begin, 'When I was a boy growing up in Ohio ' 




Richard Martin, age 14, and his 

brothers: Bob, age 12; and 

Jerry, age 4. Circa 1947. 



"Richard's parents were industrious and taught their children 
well. His father was a wonderful role model, and Richard 
reflects many of his father's best qualities. Richard was an 
ambitious youth, the first in the community in which he lived, 
to receive an Eagle Scout Award. 

"At the age of 15, Richard was stricken with polio, and lay in a 
coma for six weeks. He was in critical condition with a raging 
fever. He was not expected to survive. He did, but was 
paralyzed from the neck down. The doctors predicted he would 
never walk again. 

"Richard was determined that he would walk. Three years after 
the onset of his illness, following many falls, failures, and 
disappointments, Richard was walking. This will give the 
reader some idea of the tenacity of his spirit and also the divine 
intervention for which he pleaded." 



249 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Richard and sister, Nancy. 
Circa 1948. 



Following high school graduation, Richard attended the 
University of Idaho, Moscow, where he completed a degree in 
music (his first true love). He taught music in Northern Idaho 
for the next three years. 

He was offered a position with the Firth School District, again 
teaching music, which he accepted. Here he met his future wife. 
Since he was the teacher and she the student, he waited to begin 
his courtship until after her graduation in Spring 1959. 

Richard and Connie dated through the summer and Richard 
proposed that winter. 



CONNIE LARAINE HUBBARD AND RICHARD BRUCE 
MARTIN 



Connie Hubbard and Richard Martin 
married December 12, 1959. 

Articles and E-mails. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003a) 



(Connie) "Richard and I were married December 12, 1959, at 
my parents' home in Goshen, Idaho, by Bishop Rodney Tew. 
Richard was converted to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints and was baptized in 1961, by his father-in-law, 
Harold T. Child. Richard has been a faithful member since that 
time. 



Heidi LaRaine Martin 
born January 9, 1961. 

Richard Todd Martin 
born June 14, 1962. 



"Our first two children were Heidi LaRaine Martin, born 
January 9, 1961, at Blackfoot, Bingham County, Idaho; and 
Richard Todd Martin, born June 14, 1962, at Boise, Ada 
County, Idaho. 



"On January 14, 1964, Richard and I were privileged to attend 
the Idaho Falls Temple, where we were sealed together forever 
and our two young children, Heidi and Todd, were sealed to us." 



Thoughts on My Parents. 
(Pickens, Heidi M.. 2005) 



(Heidi) "In December 1 965, shortly before my fifth birthday, my 
parents gave me the most wonderful gift: my dad took me to 
Yuma, Arizona, to see 'The Nutcracker' on stage. I remember 
sitting next to my dad watching the ballerinas dance. I already 



250 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) and Richard Bruce Martin 



Valerie Kim Martin 
born January 29, 1965. 

Holly Beth Martin 
born January 24, 1967. 

Troy Bruce Martin 
born May 1, 1968. 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H. and Richard, 2005) 



knew all the music. Afterward, Dad and I went backstage and 
the dancer who played Clara bent down and took both my hands 
and spoke to me. My mom and dad both gave me this 
wonderful childhood memory." 

Three more children were added to the Martin family: Valerie 
Kim was born January 29, 1965, in Burley, Cassia, Idaho. Holly 
Beth was born January 24, 1967, in Yuma, Yuma, Arizona. 
Troy Bruce, was born May 1, 1968, in Yuma, Yuma, Arizona. 

Not long after the birth of their son, Troy, Richard and Connie 
moved to Oregon, where Richard found a job teaching music. 

(Connie) "Music is the sound track of my life as it has always 
been for Richard and many of his jobs have been associated 
with music. However, at times it was necessary that Richard 
hold down more than one job in order to provide for our 
growing family." 



Thoughts on My Parents. 
(Pickens, Heidi M., 2005) 



(Heidi) "I can still see my mother leading the music in Primary 
in the early 1970s in our little branch in Chiloquin, Oregon. 
Primary was held during the week and I walked up the hill to the 
little chapel after school. My mom walked the same hill pulling 
a wagon full of little children, which included my siblings and 
the daycare children she was watching. Here she taught us the 
gospel through music each week." 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Richard and Connie H., 2005a) 



(Richard) "When school let out for the summer in 1972, 1 got a 
job driving truck on a blacktopping job for Clear Lake National 
Park. My teaching certification was in question in Oregon. I 
had my Bachelor's Degree and a lot toward my Master's Degree 
but Oregon wasn't going to accept my additional work. I was 
afraid I wasn't going to have a job that fall so I was praying and 
looking for a place to teach. I was hauling a load of large rock 
up to the north entrance of Clear Lake National Park. I'd been 
pulling those hills for about half a day and when we reached 
Rim Village it was break time. I suddenly had a prompting to 



251 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



call Stewart, Nevada, and ask for a music teaching job. I had no 
idea where Stewart, Nevada, was and I had no money on me. 

"I went into the restaurant and all the guys were sitting around 
eating and talking. There must have been 15 guys sitting around 
this big table. I said, 'Hey, dig in your pockets and give me all 
the change you 've got and I '11 pay you hack tomorrow; just 
remember how much you gave me. ' I scooped it all up and went 
to the pay phone and started putting money in, and money in. 
I asked the operator to connect me with the superintendent of 
schools at Stewart, Nevada. She said, 7 don 't even know if 
there is such a place. ' And I knew there must be since the Spirit 
had told me to call. She finally said there was an off-reservation 
school near Carson City, Nevada. The super-intendent just 
happened to be in that day, which was pretty unusual; it was 
summer vacation there as well. His name was Mr. Whipple and 
I kept calling him Whimple, which is not good when you're 
asking for a job. 

"I told him I was looking for a position as a music teacher. He 
seemed a little surprised and asked how I knew there was a job 
available. I told him some of my credentials and experience and 
then he asked, 'Who is your pipeline here to this school that tells 
you there is a job open?' I said I was sorry but I really didn't 
know anything about the school; I wasn't even sure where it was 
located. He said, 'I'll send you the papers to apply for the job 
but the woman who had the job for the last five or six years just 
walked in a half-hour ago and resigned. So, tell me, who is your 
pipeline? ' Needless to say, I got the job. 

"It was the beginning of a lot of good things, but our children 
paid a high price for living in that area." 

(Connie) "We were living in Carson City, Nevada, when Holly 
was about eight years old and, for about three days several times 
a day she kept asking me the same question: 'Mom, are you 
sure you '11 absolutely have a heart attack if you know there is a 
snake in the house? Mom are you sure you'll die with a big 



252 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) and Richard Bruce Martin 

heart attack if there is a snake in the house?' So on the third 
day I said, 'You don 't have a snake in this house do you, Holly 
Beth?'' And she said, 'Well kind of! ' So she took me out on the 
little back porch and I couldn't look at it. But I said in a very 
frightened voice, 'So you have a snake out here?' She said, 
'Yes, and it's Agnes. ' I told her to get it out of there right now 
and she said, 'But I '11 miss Agnes. I take Agnes for a walk every 
day but I don 't want my mom to have a big heart attack! ' 

"Another time we were living in Stewart, Nevada, about a mile 
down the road from where Richard taught. Holly came to me 
and asked if we could go for a little walk. Of course, I said, 
' Yes. ' I wasn't too concerned because Holly is a little dramatic; 
(I don't know where she got that.) I name everything, so we 
went down the rabbit trail. (I named all the little paths and trails 
around our place.) I wasn't worried but I was so young! She 
said, 'Now don't get upset! Four weeks ago last Thursday I was 
out looking for lizards. I didn 't have my shoes on and I stepped 
on a nail. But, don 't worry, Mom, I slept with my mouth open 
for three weeks so I wouldn 't get lockjaw! ' 




Richard and Connie Martin. 



"Holly also told me she rescued the mice from the cat's mouth 
and the mice would bite her. I used to worry about her a lot! 

"In August 1973, at the beginning of Richard's second year at 
the Stewart school, all the administrators and teachers attended 
a meeting to prepare for the coming year. Richard was called to 
the front and given an award for meritorious service and a 
$2,000 per year raise. He was given two more raises during that 
school year. Richard was provided an entire building for his 
music students. Whenever I visited him at work, which wasn't 
often, I could hear the Indian students laughing and talking as I 
approached the room but, as soon as I walked in, they were very 
quiet and watchful. A white woman in the building! It was a 
very uncomfortable feeling for me. 



253 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"Richard was provided with a van and given tickets to various 
musical events. One time he took seven girls to Tahoe in the 
van for the performance of a harpist. After the performance, she 
invited him to bring the girls up on stage so they could see the 
harp up close. 

"Those students were really difficult to deal with and the 
Apache students were the most difficult. I could tell which ones 
were Apache just by their looks and demeanor. The Indians 
lived an entirely different life than we did. They thought 
everything was theirs for the taking and just walked out of the 
store with whatever they wanted. The government dole 
reinforced this thinking. Many of the students were arrested at 
the gates as soon as school was out and sent to jail, some for 
terrible crimes. 

"Living at the Stewart Indian School was a difficult time for our 
children. They had a hard time adjusting to the new school and 
the area." 



Thoughts on My Parents. 
(Pickens, Heidi M, 2005) 



(Heidi) "We didn't have much money when I was growing up, 
yet somehow music was always provided to all five of us. My 
parents sacrificed so greatly in order to provide a piano in our 
home. Some of my most precious memories are singing around 
a worn Kimball piano at home, or sitting on a wooden bench in 
church and singing hymns. I was always surprised when, upon 
visiting the homes of my friends, I realized they didn't have a 
piano." 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003b) 



(Connie) "Richard taught music for more than 37 years in public 
school and for the federal government. Following his 
retirement, he taught private music lessons until recently, when 
his health failed and he was forced to give it up. 



"In about 1991 , we moved back to Idaho from the Crit Colorado 
Indian Tribe Reservation in Parker, Arizona. 



254 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) and Richard Bruce Martin 

"About five years ago (1997), our very good friend, Charlene 
Riggs, from the Navajo Tribe came to visit. The mother-in-law 
to one of her nieces was coming up this way and she asked if 
they could stop here. The nieces mother-in-law was from the 
Tetonia area and told me her maiden name was Ripplinger. It 
turned out Richard Ripplinger was her grandfather. I told her 
the story Uncle Johnnie had always told about good old Richard 
Ripplinger when he worked for Grandpa Madsen. She and I had 
a good laugh over poor old Richard Ripplinger." (See 
Chapter 2, Volume I, for the complete story.) 



Articles and E-mails. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003a) 




Richard, Connie, and Bonnie enjoy 
an impromptu Karaoke sing-along. 



(Connie) "Richard is a very good man. He is in the final stages 
of renal failure and is on kidney dialysis and drives to the Gem 
State Dialysis Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho, every other day. 
Even though he suffers, Richard always looks for the bright side 
of every situation. He loves sunshine and always looks forward 
to Spring. 

"Even on days that Richard isn't feeling his best, he is anxious 
to take me for a drive to ensure I get out of the house, at least for 
a bit. I suffer from Lupus and several other things, so our lives 
are centered around medical care and home. My illness has 
made me a virtual shut-in and I spend my days writing, singing 
with my Karaoke machine, and visiting with friends and family 
on the telephone. I also communicate through the Internet and 
Richard is very patient in helping me hone my skills on the 
computer." 



Conversations. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004-2005) 



(Marlene) "Connie has been tutoring a neighbor for the last 
1 1 years. He is now reading on a high school level. This 
neighbor has received a promotion at work and I believe it is 
directly attributable to Connie's diligence. She may be stuck at 
home but it doesn't stop her from doing good works." 



Articles and E-mails. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003a) 



(Connie) "Richard has been a resolute member of the Church 
since his baptism and has held numerous positions including: 
Branch President, High Counselor, President of the Sunday 
School, Stake Missionary, Elder's Quorum President, Executive 



255 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Shirley Jean, Bonnie Rae, and 
Connie LaRaine. 



Secretary, temple worker, and numerous callings associated 
with music. Currently, Richard is a home teacher, visiting one 
family without a father in the home. He is assisting the mother 
to hone her piano skills. He believes there is always a way to 
serve no matter what your personal circumstances are. 

"I have been so blessed in my life. I have five wonderful 
children and all these wonderful grandchildren and I know they 
came from a wonderful place. I also have a resolute testimony 
of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. I know that our Savior succors us. 
Together Richard and I have worked to perform vicarious 
ordinances for many of his ancestors." 



Thoughts on My Parents. 
(Pickens, Heidi M., 2005) 




Sisters, Connie and Bonnie. 



(Heidi) "My parents often sang duets at various functions. 
Some of my favorite songs they sang are, 'He, ' 'In The Garden, ' 
'Moments to Remember, ' 'Each Cooing Dove ' and 'Far, Far 
Away on Judea 's Plains. ' When I sit in church and sing the 
hymns, I can picture our family in Idaho, Arizona, Nevada, or 
a little branch in Chiloquin, Oregon, sitting on a bench singing 
together. I feel a strong connection between the past, present, 
and future, especially when we sing, 'The Spirit of God. '" 

Connie and Richard have the following children and 
grandchildren: 

Heidi LaRaine was born January 9, 1961, in Blackfoot, 
Bingham, Idaho. She married William (Will) Pickens. They 
live in Gooding, Idaho. Their family consists of Jessica, age 17; 
Tyler, age 15; Caitlin, age 12; and Keely, age 10. 

Richard Todd was born June 14, 1962, in Boise, Ada, Idaho. 
Todd has two sons: Ryan, born in 1988, and Matthew, born in 
1989. The boys live with their mother, Merly Alejandro, in the 
Philippines. Todd currently resides in Hawaii. 



256 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) and Richard Bruce Martin 

Valerie Kim was born January 29, 1965, in Burley, Cassia, 
Idaho. She is married to Scott Nettgen. They live in Illinois and 
have five children: Aaron, born in 1985; Steven, born in 1987; 
Jordan, born in 1993; Krista, born in 1995; and Jason, born in 
2002. 

Holly Beth was born January 24, 1967, in Yuma, Yuma, 
Arizona. She married Dean Martines. They live in Mesa, 
Arizona, and have two children: Dean, born in 1999; and 
Kaylee Beth, born in 2002. 




Connie and Richard in 1995. 



Our son, Troy Bruce, was born May 1, 1968, in Yuma, Yuma, 
Arizona. After graduating from high school, he served a 
mission for the Church in the Washington Seattle Mission in 
1987-1989. On June 30, 1991, he married Lucrecia Moreno. In 
July 1991, Troy joined the Navy and is currently stationed at 
Diego Garcia, Guam (a small speck in the Indian Ocean). He is 
a physician's assistant at the U.S. Naval Base Hospital. He and 
Lucrecia have three children: Sean, born 1992; Ryan, born 
1996; and Maria, born 2002. Lucrecia and the children will 
remain in San Diego, California, until Troy's tour of duty at 
Diego Garcia is completed in January 2006. 



257 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Connie LaRainc Hubbard has always loved the out-of-doors and has a very tender heart, especially 
when it comes to animals. She is shown above in a variety of situations and at various ages between 
about age three and age six. Circa 1940s. Courtesy Terry Child. 



25X 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) and Richard Bruce Martin 





Growing up with bigger sisters is never easy but 
I Connie appears to make the most of it. She is 
shown posing (upper left) while her sisters, Shirley 
and Bonnie, are more solemn. In the photo above, 
Connie (far right) and Bonnie (far left) look pensive 
while Shirley (center) appears to be having a good 
time. 

At about age eight, Connie LaRaine (left) sports 
dark ringlets and large eyes. 

All pictures courtesy Terry Child. 



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259 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Home of Emmett 
Hubbards' parents, 
Milton and Florence 
Octavia Leisure Hubbard. 
Possibly located in Center- 
town, Kentucky. Courtesy 
Bonnie Rae Hansen. 





The above picture was taken at a family camping trip in mountains. Back row, L to R: Harold, Amy 
Pearl, Dewane, Jeanice, and Shirley. Front row, L to R: Connie, Terry, and Bonnie. Circa 1952. 
Courtesy Terry Child. 



260 



Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) and Richard Bruce Martin 



Connie LaRaine may be unable to go out into 
the sunshine she loves but she has found other 
ways to bring sunshine into her life. One 
example is her love of music. She is shown 
in these photos singing along with her 
Karaoke machine. Circa 2002. Courtesy 
Merry F. Shaw. 




261 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



262 



Chapter 13 
HAROLD TERRY CHILD 




Harold Terry Child 

and his children, 

Kristan Marie Child 

and Shawn Thomas 

Child. 

Circa 1987. 



Information for this chapter provided by 
Harold Terry Child, Bonnie Rae Hansen, 
and Connie LaRaine Martin. 
Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Amy Pearl Madsen 

Born: 4 Aug 1912, Cache, Fremont, Idaho 
Died: 1 9 Jul 2002, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 


V 



Married: Harold Thomas Child 

Born: 1 7 Oct 1 9 1 5, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: 4 Nov 1984, Provo, Utah, Utah 



Harold Terry Child 

Born: 22 Aug 1946, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Jennifer Sethman 



Born: 



Died: Living 



> 



Shawn Thomas Child 

Born: 5 Jan 1971, Portland, Multnomah, Oregon 
Died: Living 



-> 



Kristan Marie Child 

Born: 1 May 1975, Portland, Multnomah, Oregon 
Died: Living 



Harold Terry Child 



HAROLD TERRY CHILD 



1946 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Amy) "I was going to have a baby! My sixth. It sure seemed 
like a lot of kids, but I knew every little spirit in Heaven needs 
a home, so a baby boy was born." 



Harold Terry Child born 
August 22, 1946. 



Harold Terry Child was born on August 22, 1946, to Amy Pearl 
Madsen and Harold Thomas Child. He was the sixth child born 
to his mother, but his father's first and only son. He was named 
for his father and grandfather (they all have the same initials). 
Terry's older brother and sisters include: Elvin Wesley 
Goodson, Amy Jeanice Goodson, Shirley Jean Hubbard, Bonnie 
Rae Hubbard, and Connie LaRaine Hubbard. 



On September 29, 1946, Terry was given a blessing in the 
Shelley Second Ward by his paternal grandfather, Heber 
Thomas Child. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Amy) "Terry weighed 9 pounds 13 ounces when he was born. 
He had a cute little round face, curly hair, and big blue eyes. 
Wherever I took him, someone would look at him and remark 
on what a beautiful baby he was. He was a dear, sweet boy and 
brought me much joy and happiness." 



Remnants of H. Terry Child's 

'Life Tapestry.' 

(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 



(Connie) "When I was four years old, I had a very strong desire 
for my mom to bring home a new little baby. I remember telling 
her to get really fat, get really sick, and go somewhere and get 
us a baby. One early morning when I was five, she woke me up. 
She was standing over me in her red bathrobe trimmed in navy 
blue and told me she was going to get us a new baby. It was 
August 22, 1946. Later, when I learned we had a new baby 
brother, I was happy enough, but what really excited me was the 
prospect of spending 10 days with Aunt Ruby. 



"At the end of the 10 days, Aunt Ruby brought me home. I was 
glad to be home because on Saturday it was matinee at the 
Virginia Theater. I was excited as I ran in the house. I took a 
quick look at my new brother. Yes, he was cute! Then 



265 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Harold Terry Child bundled against 

the Idaho cold. 

Circa 1946. 



something terrible happened. My mother told Shirley, Bonnie, 
and me we would not be going to the matinee that day. Well, it 
didn't matter to me that Mama had just gotten home from 
Eaton's Maternity Home in Shelley. I threw such a temper 
tantrum! Instead of a spanking as I deserved, my mother gave 
in and we went to the matinee! 

"Terry was such a sweet, cherubic baby and I fell in love with 
him right away. During his first winter, we dressed Terry in a 
little blue bunting to keep him warm. He hated that bunting and 
screamed and turned red whenever it was put on him. 

"When he was about eight months old, we moved to our little 
40-acre farm in Goshen. That summer, I took a good look at 
Terry and wondered what he would look like as an Indian 
warrior. I got the food coloring from the kitchen and streaked 
it all over his sweet little face. He didn't look so good. I tried 
my six-year-old best to wash it off but water wasn't taking it off 
very well. So, I decided to get some gasoline! Thankfully my 
mama figured out what we were up to just in time. I thought 
maybe she would join the warpath when she saw what I'd done 
to her baby, but she just laughed and cleaned him up. 



"It must have been difficult for Terry growing up with four big 
sisters. I imagine he felt a little like the proverbial 'lonely 
petunia in the onion patch. ' Terry's only brother, Elvin, was 16 
years old when he was born so they had little chance to form a 
relationship. 

"When Terry was little, he developed pneumonia and had to be 
put in the hospital. It was a very frightening time for the whole 
family. We were all so grateful to Heavenly Father for saying 
'Yes ' to our prayers for his recovery. 

"One night while Terry and I were still pretty young, the Home 
Teachers came to our home on their monthly visit and one of 
them told us his little girl was suffering from convulsions. For 
some unexplained reason, Terry and I thought the word 



266 



Harold Terry Child 



'convulsions' was the funniest word we'd ever heard and we 
began to laugh nonstop. Mama gave us that, 'You'd better 
knock it off, ' look but we were unable to stop our hyena-like 
laughing. I'm happy to say the little girl in question recovered, 
no thanks to Terry and me. 




Harold Terry Child at about age eight. 



"While we lived on the farm, we kept our bottled fruit and 
produce in a cellar, a pit dug into the ground with a sod roof, 
and steps down to a door, which kept in the cool. When Terry 
was three years old, he asked if he could get the potatoes for the 
evening meal. Mama gave him the dishpan in which to carry the 
potatoes and sent him on his way. He was down there quite 
awhile and, when he finally came back out, he had something 
quite fun and exciting in his dishpan, and it wasn't spuds. He 
had found a litter of newborn puppies. We'd taken in a stray 
dog a few weeks earlier and, somehow concealing her secret, 
she had given birth to her puppies in the cellar. Terry was 
elated." 

Terry was loved by his older brother and especially his sisters, 
who carried him around and took care of him. When Terry 
refused to pick up his own toys, his sisters did it for him. 



Harold decided to adopt all the older children and, once that was 
accomplished, on December 21, 1951, Amy and Harold took 
five of their six children to the temple where they were sealed 
together for time and eternity. Elvin was serving in the U.S. Air 
Force at the time and was unable to attend. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M., 1971) 



(Amy) I taught Terry to say his prayers and the family attended 
church regularly. Terry loved to have his hair cut and look nice 
for church. He enjoyed Primary but had a very hard time sitting 
quietly through the rest of the meetings. I asked his teacher 
often how he was doing and she always said, 'alright. ' 



"Years later, when he was grown, she told me she would have 
had a good class if Terry hadn't been so wild and noisy. She 



267 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



told me he played marbles in class all the time. I told her it was 
a little late to tell me that. 



Remnants of H. Terry Child's 

'Life Tapestry.' 

(Martin, Connie H., 2005) 



On September 5, 1954, just after Terry turned eight years old, 
his father baptized him a member of The Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter-day Saints. 

(Connie) "In 1954, Southeastern Idaho experienced television 
for the first time. The closest television company was KIDTV 
in Idaho Falls. They broadcast a test pattern for months before 
they actually began showing televised programs. Then when the 
first programs were finally transmitted, Terry and I made 
popcorn and watched the test pattern for hours waiting for the 
4:45 p.m. showing of the 'Sheriff Dean Show.' To us it was 
wonderful!" 




Terry Child feeds sugar cubes 

to his horse, Buck. 

Circa about 1952. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M.. 1971) 



As Terry grew, he exhibited a great love for the many animals 
on the farm. He had dogs, cats, rabbits, and a horse, which he 
named Buck. He also had a mother pig and used her little 
babies as his agricultural project in school. 

Terry especially enjoyed outdoor activities such as fishing with 
his dad, family camping trips, and visiting Yellowstone National 
Park. All the children loved these trips and had fun keeping 
track of the number of bears they saw. They always stopped 
often and walked around all the geysers on the board walks. 
There was none of today's modern camping gear on these trips. 
The family piled blankets and pillows in the car and packed 
food and cooking utensils from the kitchen. One summer, Amy 
and Harold took Terry and Jeanice's three little boys to 
Yellowstone Park. At that time, Amy and Harold were driving 
an old orange Rambler they got from Richard and Connie 
Hubbard Martin. (Amy) "The front wheels were so out of line 
that it was just a total scream how that thing shimmied. It was 
the worst I've ever seen. We just went along bucking and 
shaking, but we made the trip. " 



26X 



Harold Terry Child 



The family took many camping trips to the Teton Basin where 
they camped in Wolverine and Horseshoe canyons. When they 
camped at Wolverine Canyon, Terry and his sisters would hike 
up to the Forty Horse Cave. 



"If they had gotten lost for real, some 

leader would have gotten strangled to 

death for letting these little boys go 

hiking without any supervision. 

This is no kidding!" 

Amy M. Child 



This hiking practice didn't prepare Terry for his first Scout 
Camp experience. The Scout Leader took his troop to Stanley 
Basin (probably) where he let Terry and another boy go hiking 
up the mountain. They got lost but, fortunately, found their own 
way back to the camp. 




Terry excelled in many sports 

in high school and won a 

championship in the high hurdles. 



As a youth, Terry took piano, violin, and drum lessons for a 
very short time. But his real strength was sports, and he 
excelled at whatever sport he tried. 

Terry liked to swim and, for three consecutive summers, took 
lessons at the swimming pool in Idaho Falls, Idaho, where he 
earned a swimming badge and graduated. He used this skill to 
teach his three little nephews, Eugene, Randy, and Dennis, how 
to swim in the canal near his home in Goshen. 




Ted and Bob Reid (back). 
Terry and Steve Ocerman (front). 



As Terry grew, he remained active in the church and was 
ordained a Deacon, Teacher, and Priest, respectively, by his 
father. Following his ordination as a Priest, he was allowed to 
perform baptisms and was given the privilege of baptizing his 
nephew, Dennis, when he turned eight years old. He also 
baptized Connie Steffler, a little girl in the Shelley Second 
Ward. 

Christmas was always a special time in the Child home. They 
always had a program on Christmas Eve and all the children 
took parts. After Jeanice and Dewane were married, they came 
and brought their children. There were lots of lights, bells, 
tinsel, and a big tree standing in the corner all lit up and 
glowing. Songs were sung, the stories about Jesus were told and 
retold, and Amy played the organ. Usually Dewane sang as 
well. He had a beautiful singing voice. 



269 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Another winter fun time was going to 'pulling hill.' It was fun 
pulling those little sleighs to the top of the hill and coasting 
down. Jeanice and her family joined in as well and Jeanice flew 
down the hill laughing and screaming with joy. Terry, Eugene, 
Randy, and Dennis ran up that hill dozens of times. Then they 
would slide down with the snow flying in their faces. Harold 
helped pull the sleighs to the top and came down with one of the 
little ones in front. Amy usually had Sherry on her sleigh and 
Dewane would bring Julie, who was just a baby. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M, 1971) 



Terry loved to play ball and began playing as soon as he was big 
enough to hold a bat. During his school years, he was very 
active in all the sports including baseball, basketball, football, 
and track. He played football and his parents attended nearly 
every game. They traveled to Driggs for one game and took 
three of the high school girls with them. On the way home they 
"hit the worst blizzard coming over Piny Creek Pass I've ever 
seen, but our good driver got us home. " 

They traveled as far away as Jackpot, Nevada, sometimes on 
terrible roads. On one occasion, Amy writes, "We traveled to 
Terreton to the game. When we started home, it was so foggy 
we could hardly see the hood of the car. Harold had to drive 
with his head out the window to get us home that night. " Harold 
always kept score and was very proud of his son and the Firth 
High School team. Terry held the State record in the high 
hurdles. He was a star player and all-around good athlete. 



Minnie Bolander Accampo Child died 
September 16, 1951. 

Heber Thomas Child 
died January 30, 1957. 



Terry had several cars when he was growing up. One was a 
white Ford Falcon he got from his parents when they bought a 
new car. He drove this car to school and on a lot of his dates. 
Then he set his heart on a sporty little Chevrolet convertible. He 
talked his mom into the idea of his buying it and the two of them 
convinced Harold to co-sign for Terry. 



270 



Harold Terry Child 



Terry graduated from Firth High School and attended Ricks 
College. His parents visited him often and Amy cooked his 
favorite foods and kept him well supplied. 



Conversation, 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "When Terry was about 19, he married Roberta and 
they moved to Ogden, Utah, so he could attend Weber State 
College. One day in 1968, we stopped by their little apartment 
to visit. We had Connie's little girl, Valerie, with us and she 
was just three years old. She took one look around and asked 
where all their toys were. Terry explained they didn't have any 
toys. Valerie said, 'That 's alright. We can wait right here while 
you go buy some toys for us to plays with. ' He and Roberta 
were married for about three years during which they struggled 
with school and no money. They were divorced not long after 
our visit." 



Harold Terry Child and Jennifer 
Sethmann married August 27, 1969. 



On August 27, 1969, Terry married Jennifer Sethmann. They 
had two children: Shawn Thomas, born January 5, 1971; and 
Kristan Marie, born May 1, 1975. The family moved following 
work opportunities, living in Idaho Falls and Firth, Idaho; and 
Ogden, Utah. While in Ogden, Terry attended Weber State 
College. They later moved to Portland, Oregon, where Terry 
worked for the State of Oregon. He and Jennifer were later 
divorced. 



In 2003, Terry retired from his job with the state and moved 
back to the area of his childhood, settling in the mobile home 
left him by his parents. Here he continued his friendship with 
those school friends with whom he had been so close. He also 
renewed his acquaintance with his religious roots. 



Child, Amy M., in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Amy) "Terry is loving, kind, polite, obedient, and has a cute 
personality. Terry was our baby. He brought us much joy from 
the time he was born. We all loved him. He was obedient to his 
parents, and it wasn't hard for him to show his love for me. He 
was athletic in high school. He has a beautiful smile and is 
pleasant and good natured." 



271 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



(Connie) "In December 2004, Terry spent Christmas with his 
son, Shawn, and his family. Shawn's children love their 

Conversation. 

(Martin, Connie H., 2005) Grandpa Terry. The four youngest are still at home and love to 

play with Grandpa. While he was there, the kids gave him a 
manicure and pedicure and painted his nails in bright colors. 
Then they braided his hair in tiny little braids with elastics to 
hold them in place. He came home like that! Well, he didn't 
get around to taking the polish off his and toe nails before he 
had to go in for a checkup with his doctor. He figured he'd be 
okay since the doctor would just listen to his chest and such. 
When the doctor asked him to take off his shoes and socks, he 
hesitated, and finally explained about the bright polish. The 
doctor said the polish didn't bother him but, if Terry started 
coming in with bright pink panties on, then he would worry! 

"Terry is a wonderful father and grandfather. I am so blessed to 
have Terry as a brother, friend, and close neighbor. He is such 
a personable, nice, generous man. He is definitely worth 
missing a Saturday matinee for. Looking at pictures of Terry 
brings back so many fond memories of our childhood." 



272 



Harold Terry Child 




The photograph of Harold Thomas Child and 
Amy Pearl Madsen at left was taken at the time 
they were married on March 22, 1944, at Dillon, 
Montana. Circa 1944. Courtesy Terry Child. 

Amy Pearl (below left) is supporting Terry as he 
stands on his chubby legs. Circa 1947. Bonnie 
Rae Hansen. 

Harold Terry Child (below right) at about age 
three. Circa 1949. Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 






.:' l 







j 



u wmti- ■■■> 



My Darla n 9 Baby terry . j • ? ,' / j I } i\- ■'■ 



273 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Harold Terry Child shares his initials with 
his father, Harold Thomas Child, and his 
grandfather, Heber Thomas Child (above 
left). Heber was a leading citizen of 
Shelley, Idaho, for many years. Circa 
1956. Courtesy Terry Child. 




Terry married Roberta while he was 
attending Ricks College. He then 
transferred to Weber State College in 
Ogden, Utah. They were later divorced. 



erry and Jennifer Sethmann (lower right) were married 
in 1969. They are shown in a photo possibly taken 
on a trip. Terry and Jennifer are the parents of two 
children: Shawn Thomas and Kristan Marie. They were 
later divorced. All pictures courtesyBonnie Rae Hansen. 




274 



Harold Terry Child 



In 1984, the Child family gathered for 
the funeral of Harold Thomas Child. 
Terry and his two children, Kristan 
and Shawn (left), came for the 
occasion. This photo was taken at 
Amy Pearl's home. Circa 1984. 
Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



Terry Child with his mother, Amy 
Pearl, at her home in Firth, Idaho. 
Circa 1984. Courtesy Bonnie Rae 
Hansen. 




275 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Terry's children and grandchildren are pictured above: back row, L to R: Josie, age 10; Terry's 
daughter, Kristan Child; Trevor, age 17; and Fallon, age 10. Front row, L to R: Terry's son, Shawn 

Thomas; Toni, Shawn's wife; Logan, age 5; and Monte, age 8. 



276 



Chapter 14 
RUBY NADA MADSEN 

AND 
HOWARD LESLIE SORTOR 




Howard Leslie Sortor and Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor celebrated 50 years 

together on August 8, 1984. 



Information for this chapter provided by 

Judy Sortor Gillies, 

Marlene Sortor Anderson, 

and interviews by Maxine Douglass Trout. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen 

Born: 10 May 1876, Gardner, Grundy, Illinois 
Died: 19 Jul 1943, Island Park Reservoir, Fremont, 
Idaho 



Married: Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm Madsen 

Born: 20 Feb 1 864, Lystrup, Uvelse, 

Fredericksborg, Denmark 
Died: 7 Mar 1932, Cache, Teton, Idaho 



Ruby Nada Madsen 

Born: 4 Apr 1915, Cache, Fremont, Idaho 
Died: 10 Sep 1998, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 17 Nov 1 997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Erma Marlene Sortor 

Born: 8 May 1935, Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Wanda Lou Sortor 

Born: 13 Nov 1936, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Beverly Joyce Sortor 

Born: 14 Sep 1938, Sugar City, Madison, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Ruby Darlene Sortor 

Born: 18 May 1942, Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 18 May 1942, Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 



Judy Jean Sortor 

Born: 14 Jun 1945, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Sandra Lee Sortor 

Born: 31 Jul 1951, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Luella Colleen Sortor 

Born: 23 Aug 1953, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Richard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 25 Jul 1955, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Lucy May Higley 



Born: 1 9 Jun 1909, Hibbard, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 9 Sep 1933, Sugar City, Madison, Idaho 



Howard Delmer Sortor 

Born: 30 May 1928, Rich vale, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Dale George Sortor 

Born: 28 Aug 1930, Richvale, Teton, Idaho 
Died: 1 2 Feb 2004, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



LaVerl Dean Sortor 

Born: 25 Jul 1929, Richvale, Teton. Idaho 
Died: Living 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



RUBY NADA MADSEN 



1915 



Ruby M. Sortor in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Ruby) "I was born on April 4, 1915, at Cache, Teton County, 
Idaho, five miles west of Driggs. I am the ninth of 10 children 
born to Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm (Bill) and Anna Marie 
(Mary) Hansen Madsen." 



Cache Ward Records. 
(LDS Church, Undated) 



On July 4, 1915, Ruby was given a blessing in The Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Bishop R.G. Meikle. 



Ruby M. Sortor in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 

Velna Syble Madsen 
born April 5, 1917. 

Great Spanish Influenza Pandemic. 

Millions died. 



(Ruby) "I was sick a lot when I was growing up. I had 
pneumonia almost every winter. When I was three years old, I 
almost died and Mama took me to Henry Mickelsen's house to 
stay because their house was better than ours. The doctor said 
I had to get out of our house and stay at Mickelsen's until I got 
better. Mama was a very faithful person, she always had the 
Elders come when I was sick and I was healed many times 
through prayer." 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor. 
(Sortor, Ruby M., Undated) 





Ruby Nada Madsen. 
Circa 1915. 



(Ruby) "When I was growing up it was much different than 
today. We lived in a small log house and, in the winter, our 
bedrooms were very cold. We heated big rocks and put them in 
the bottom of our beds to warm them up. We had no modern 
conveniences. We had kerosene lamps for indoor lighting. Our 
toilet was out by the chicken coop and, in the winter, we had to 
go through high drifts to get there. 

"In the winter we had parties with our friends at various homes. 
We didn 't have a car, so we walked almost everywhere we went. 
We traveled by sleigh or wagon to town. 

"We drew our water from a well. In the summer we used the 
well for a refrigerator. The things we wanted to keep cool, we 
put in a bucket, tied a rope to the handle, and lowered it into the 
well. We set Jello this way, too. 



279 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Ruby Nada and Velna Madsen and 

Joy Rathjens have a tea party 

at the Madsen home in Teton Basin. 

Circa 1919. 




Velna and Ruby Madsen. 
Circa 1920. 



"Our first washing machine had a handle that was pulled back 
and forth. We took turns, five minutes at a time. We watched 
the clock like hawks so we knew when our time was up. On 
Saturday morning, we churned butter in a big wooden churn. 
We took turns with this chore, also. 

"We had no television or radio so, when we were real young, we 
learned to crochet, embroider, and quilt. Once in a great while 
we saw a silent movie. 

"In the fall, our mother sewed three dresses for each of us girls: 
two for school and one for church. We had one pair of shoes. 
We polished them on Saturday for church. We also wore long 
stockings and long-legged underwear. When I was in the fourth 
grade, I began to hate that underwear. In the morning when I 
got down the road a ways, I would roll them up past my knees. 
Before I came home, I rolled them back down. Our school was 
two rooms: first to fourth grade in one; and fifth to eighth in the 
other one. There was one teacher for each room. At Christmas 
all the grades put on a program and exchanged gifts. Santa 
Claus came, too, and that was the biggest night of the year. 

"Our church was small. There was a recreation hall that served 
as the chapel, a stage, and a Relief Society room. When we 
separated for classes, each class took chairs and formed a circle 
for their class. 

"The Fourth of July was a special day. We took our lunch, went 
to the celebration, and stayed all day. We each had 10 cents to 
spend. I always bought pink popcorn and an ice cream cone." 



Ruby M. Sorter in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet. 1992) 



(Ruby) "We didn't have much, but we were happy and had a lot 
of fun. Velna, Amy, and I cut paper dolls from old magazines 
and catalogs. We made cars for them out of shoe boxes. Amy 
cut a picture of a baby boy from a magazine and pasted him on 
a piece of cardboard. She named him Max and played with him 
for months. 



2X0 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



"I remember one Christmas, Johnnie and the older, married 
sisters bought a big wooden bucket full of candy. Oh, boy! We 
thought that was great. We didn't get much for Christmas, but 
what we got we really appreciated. 

"I remember Johnnie taking care of his rabbits and his horse. 
He was a lot of fun and I always loved Johnnie. 

"I don't remember my older sisters living at home, but we had 
a lot of fun with Anna's kids: Howard, Grant, and Hazel. They 
used to come and stay with us. One day we all went down to the 
creek to wade, and Howard said if a snake came he would blow 
its head off with a rock. So I said, "Howard, here comes a big 
snake!" He got so scared he fell head first into the water and, 
when he found out I was just fooling him, he took after me and 
chased me all the way back home." 

On September 2, 1924, Ruby was baptized a member of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 



A School Story. 
(Sortor, Ruby M, Undated) 




Ruby Nada Madsen. 
Circa 1930. 



(Ruby) "When I was in the sixth grade, my school had a math 
contest. The prize for the best math scores was a silver dollar. 
With Mama's help, I studied very hard each night to prepare for 
the contest. The time spent studying by the kerosene lamp paid 
off because I won! My teacher gave me the silver dollar and I 
ran home so fast my feet barely touched the ground. I tapped 
the silver dollar on the window of our front porch. Mama came 
to the door and clapped her hands. Together we shouted; me 
saying, 7 won, I won! ' And her saying, 'You won, you won! ' 
I saved the dollar for several days then gave it to Mama to buy 
food for our family. In 1926, a lot of food could be purchased 
for one dollar. Probably enough to last our family for two 
weeks. Long after the dollar was spent, the thrill of winning and 
showing the dollar to Mama was still with me." 



281 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor. 
(Sortor, Ruby M., Undated) 



Marcelling is a method of crimping 
and waving hair with a curling iron. 



(Ruby) "When I was in the eighth grade, I worked for our 
neighbor cleaning her house. It took me all day to scrub her 
floors on my hands and knees and she payed me 50 cents. I 
saved this and bought orchid taffeta for a graduation dress, new 
shoes, and my first pair of nylon stockings. I also went to a 
beauty shop and had my hair 'marcelled.' A year after 
graduation, I went to St. Anthony to stay with my married sister, 
Anna. I began working at the Allen Seed House sorting pea 
seed. I made about $10.00 a week. I used that money to buy 
store-bought clothes, but no long-legged underwear!" 



Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm Madsen 
died March 7, 1932. 



Ruby's parents and youngest sister also moved to St. Anthony 
in about 1930. However, Ruby's father was not happy living in 
the "city" and moved back to the Basin where he lived with 
Stella and Orrin Douglass. They were living in the Madsen 
cabin at that time. On March 7, 1932, Ruby's father passed 
away. There was a bitter blizzard raging in the Basin and those 
attending the funeral from out of town were forced to journey by 
train. 



HOWARD LESLIE SORTOR 



1905 



Howard Leslie Sortor 
born May 5, 1905. 



Howard Leslie Sortor was born May 5, 1905, in Soda Springs, 
Caribou County, Idaho. He was the second of five children born 
to George Henry and Rose May Hart Sortor. 



Various. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 

Sortor also spelled Sartore, Sartor, 
Sortore, and Sorter. 



(Judy) "My grandpa, George Henry Sortor, was born in Azalia, 
Washentaw County, Michigan, on March 6, 1877. He was the 
eldest of six children born to George Washington and Katherine 
VanDyke Sortor. His siblings included: Alma Sortor Lewis, 
Wilford Sortor, Laura Droft, Hazel Gibson Blackman, and Gene 
Gibson. 



"My grandmother, Rose May Hart, was born at Blue Hills, 
Webster, Nebraska. She was the first child born to Thomas 
Benton and Sarah Ellen (Ella) Glauner Hart. Thomas died 
shortly after the birth of the couple's second child, Bessie. Ella 



2K2 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



was left to raise her two daughters alone. She decided to join 
her parents, Benjamin F. and Sarah Glauner, and her brothers 
and sisters, on their trek west. Ella packed her two daughters 
and her few belongings into a mule-drawn, covered wagon and 
traveled from Nebraska to Soda Springs, Idaho. Rose May was 
five years old at the beginning of the journey and later delighted 
in telling her children and grandchildren of her adventures in 
crossing the plains. 

"Rose remembered vividly the hours spent riding in the 
bouncing, slow-moving wagon. Sometimes she walked with her 
mother behind the wagon to lighten the load for the mule team 
while her grandmother rode holding three-year-old Bessie. 
Other times she sat in the back of the wagon watching what was 
being left behind. Once, Rose fell out of the wagon and was 
frightened beyond belief because she feared the family would 
leave her. She yelled loudly as she fell, and was immediately 
picked up and returned to safety by her uncle. Rose always said 
her own story was not nearly as exciting as that of the little girl 
who was found and raised by Native Americans, but she 
relished reliving the adventure anyway. 

"At night, the family sat by a fire, ate dinner, sang songs, and 
made plans for the next day's journey. The children were 
tucked into the wagon to sleep with the adults nearby on the 
ground. 

"Rose attended school in Soda Springs in a one-room school 
house. She was a good student and learned her lessons well. In 
fourth grade, Rose fretted over an art project. She wasn't a good 
artist and feared she would get a bad mark. An older student 
offered to draw the picture for Rose. The picture she drew on 
Rose's slate was a beautiful woman's face framed in a lovely 
bonnet with a feather plume. Rose proudly handed it to her 
teacher. The teacher took the slate and, as she wiped it clean, 
said, 'Oh, Rose, what a lovely picture. Please draw it again. ' 
As Rose's heart sank to her toes, she garnered all her courage to 
admit she had cheated. Her teacher did not reach for the whip 



283 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



as expected, instead she asked Rose what lesson had been 
learned. Rose made a vow to never cheat or lie again. She also 
learned to trust in her own abilities and discover her own talents. 
Rose passed this lesson on to her children and grandchildren. 

"Rose met George Henry Sortor in 1900. George stood six feet 
two inches tall and was exceedingly handsome. He had lived 
with his family in Michigan and Nebraska and came to Idaho 
when he was 19. 

"They were married in Soda Springs, Idaho, on September 26, 
1901 . George was 24 and Rose was 17. To this marriage was 
born: Alma May, on December 9, 1902; Howard Leslie, on 
May 5, 1905; William Franklin, on November 22, 1908, at 
Woodville, Bingham County, who died shortly after birth; and 
Syral Samuel, on September 13, 1916. 

"George operated lumber mills in Preston, Georgetown, Gray's 
Lake, Soda Springs, and Teton Basin. He constructed business 
buildings and homes in these areas. George also built a gas 
station and general store in Blackfoot, Idaho. He operated the 
gas station and Rose managed the general store. A parrot 
'worked' at the store with Rose and greeted customers by 
saying, in a voice that mimicked Rose's, 'May I help you, 
mister? "' 

"While George was very successful at business and 

George Sorter's prized ... 

• i- • 4-ii • t u r -i construction, his true passion was music. He demonstrated 

violin is still in the family. r 

exceptional talent with all instruments including piano, guitar, 
base fiddle, saxophone, trumpet, and violin. George played 
professionally at dance clubs, concerts, and private parties. 
Rose played the accordion and sang. When they traveled, 
George and Rose carried their musical instruments with them 
and shared their talents with all acquaintances. George also 
composed piano pieces, one of which was entitled 'Colthorp.' 



2X4 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



Obituary. 

(Idaho State Journal, 1997) 



"George and Rose entertained frequently in their home where 
guests were delighted with musical entertainment. Howard 
Leslie Sortor grew up in a home filled with music." 



When Howard was young, the family moved to Hagerman, 
Idaho, where Howard worked at farming and ranching. 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M, 1971) 




Howard Leslie and Lucy May Higley 
Sortor and a cousin. 




Howard and Lucy with their three 
little boys shortly before her death. 

Ruby M. Sortor in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 

Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard 
Leslie Sortor married August 8, 1934. 

Erma Marlene Sortor born 
May 8, 1935. 



(Amy) "Howard told me about the first time he rode down into 
Teton Basin. He rode a horse over the point and came down 
into Horseshoe Canyon to our home. He was only 16 years old 
at that time. Mama sold him a loaf of bread for five cents." 

In about 1927, Howard Leslie Sortor married Lucy May Higley, 
the daughter of Alfred Dewey and Bessie Hart Higley. She was 
born at Hibbard, Idaho, on June 19, 1909. The couple were 
blessed with three sons: Howard Delmer, born May 31, 1928; 
LaVerl Dean, born July 25, 1929; and Dale George, born 
August 8, 1930. All three boys were born at Richvale, Teton, 
Idaho. 

Howard moved his family from the Basin to either Sugar City 
or St. Anthony. On September 9, 1933, Lucy May Higley 
Sortor died giving birth to a tiny baby girl at St. Anthony, Idaho. 
Lucy is buried in Sugar City, Idaho. Howard was acquainted 
with the Madsen family and later courted Mary's daughter, 
Ruby. 

RUBY NADA MADSEN AND HOWARD LESLIE 
SORTOR 

(Ruby) "I married Howard Leslie Sortor on August 8, 1934, at 
the court house in Rexburg, Idaho. He had three little boys 
when we were married: Delmer, age 6; LaVerl, age 5; and Dale, 
age 4. 

"Then we had Erma Marlene, born May 8, 1935; Wanda Lou, 
born November 13, 1936; and Beverly Joyce, born 
September 14, 1938." 



285 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Wanda Lou Sorter 
born November 13, 1936. 

Beverly Joyce Sortor 
born September 14, 1938. 



Uncle Johnnie. 
(Sorter, LaVerl, 2003) 



Howard and Ruby moved back to Teton Basin in about 1941, 
and lived in the Madsen cabin. Marlene attended first grade at 
the little school in Cache. 

(LaVerl) "One day when I was about 10 years old, I didn't get 
my chores finished before it was time for my dad to get home. 
Uncle Johnnie warned me that as soon as Daddy got home, my 
behind would be whacked hard. I was scared but knew there 
was no time to finish and I knew what awaited me. Uncle 
Johnnie went to his truck and called me over. He pulled a 
couple of magazines out and put them in my overalls, nicely 
padding my behind. Just then, Daddy drove up in his pickup. 
Daddy got out, called me over to him, and proceeded to use his 
belt across my behind. After about three whacks, I yelped 
appropriately and ran to the house. Just before Daddy and 
Uncle Johnnie were out of sight, I looked back and caught them 
winking at each other." 



Johnnie William Madsen. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



'My parents and both uncles told and 

retold this story over the years with 

great relish and much laugher." 

Judy Jean Sortor Gillies. 



(Judy) "Uncle Johnnie was good friends with Dad and Mel 
Larsen (whom we called Uncle Mel). These three men 
frequently worked together teaming horses, harvesting crops, 
calving, and conducting funerals. When Wanda Lou was about 
four years old, Daddy gave her a baby chick that she loved with 
her entire little heart. To keep the baby chick warm, Mom put 
it in a box on the oven door. Wanda Lou sat by the oven door 
day after day watching her baby chick get bigger and stronger. 
One sunny day something outside distracted Wanda Lou. No 
sooner had she left her seat by the oven, than her older sister, 
Marlene, came by and closed the oven door. Mom discovered 
the mishap too late to save the little chick. Wanda Lou was 
inconsolable. Daddy promised three more chicks to take it's 
place. This was not good enough for Wanda Lou and nothing 
was going to get her to stop crying. 



"Finally, Daddy persuaded her to have a funeral for the chick. 
He drove Wanda Lou in his truck to get Uncle Johnnie and 
Uncle Mel for the solemn event. Back home, Mom and Marlene 
prepared a matchbox as a final resting place for the little chick. 



2X6 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 




Ruby holding Beverly with 
Marlene and Wanda Sortor. 



Velna Syble Madsen Chinn 
died August 13, 1939. 



Uncle Johnnie carved a cross with the words 'Chickie Lou 
Sortor' to mark the grave. Uncle Mel was asked to say a few 
words, which were, 'Dear Lord, bless this @#** #@**/ 
chicken. Now let's cut hay.' The children all thought the 
laughter emanating from the adults was hysteria over the loss of 
Chickie Lou." 

In August 1939, Ruby's little sister, Velna, complained of a 
stomach ache. She was treated with the usual home remedies, 
however, her condition worsened and, on August 12, the doctor 
was called to examine her. He determined that her appendix had 
ruptured and she was suffering from severe peritonitis 
poisoning. There was nothing he could do for her. Several of 
Velna's sisters were present, including Amy and Ruby and, 
upon hearing the news about their baby sister, they all began 
weeping and wailing. Mary Madsen was a much more stoic 
person and informed the girls they must get hold of themselves 
at once and be strong for their little sister. Velna suffered 
terrible pain and late the next day, on August 13, 1939, she 
passed away at her mom's home. 



U.S. declared war on Germany 
and the Axis Powers in 1940. 



Ruby and her mother were very close and visited frequently. In 
her diary, dated 1941, Mary Madsen recorded several visits with 
her daughter and family: 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 



(Mary) March 6, 1941, Thursday: "Ruby and Howard came 
down tonight. Howard don 't feel very good. Going to the 
doctor. 



March 7, Friday: "/ did not get to sleep till 3:45 in the 
morning. Was we sleepy this morning. Ruby and I went down 
to Nell 's. Howard had to go to Rexburg to see about his teeth. 
Could not have anything done to them until he saw a doctor. I 
got a dog from Mrs. Peterson but I will let Ruby and Howard 
take her. 



287 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



March 8, Saturday: "Mr. Sortor came and took us to get 
Ruby 's hair curled. We got there at 10 o 'clock and stayed till 2. 
Sure was tired. Walked down to Sortor 's. Mr. Sortor took us 
home. Howard had seven teeth pulled in Rexburg. We ate 
supper over to Amy 's tonight. 

March 9, Sunday: "Ruby went over to Amy's then down to 
Sortor 's. 

March 15, Saturday: "Amy and Howard had their teeth 
pulled. I took care of the kids. I cleaned the yard. Had quite a 
fire. Ruby ran with the hose. Ruby called for a bull dog. 

March 16, Sunday: "Went to Sunday School. Ruby and 
Howard came and met me. Got dinner. Had wieners and sour 
kraut. 

March 17, Monday: "Ruby and Howard went home this 
morning at 9:30. Sure was lonesome after they went. 

April 7, Monday: "Got up late. Started to quilt. I was sitting 
writing in my diary when an egg came in on my quilt. Did not 
know where it came from. It was Howard and Stell. Howard 
brought me a dozen eggs. 

May 29, Thursday: "Ruby and Howard came. I went home 
with them. Amy and Emmett came too in their car. We went to 
Johnnie 's and had supper. Ruby and Howard were there too. 
We went home at 11 o 'clock. 

May 30, Friday: "We got up and got breakfast. Got ready for 
the cemetery. We went to the cemetery, then came a storm up 
that we could not go on our picnic so we ate in the house. It 
hailed. The ground was white. Ruby had 53 little chickens, 
almost got drowned. Howard brought them in. They were all 
down. Ruby did not feel good about them. Not one died, so it 
was all okay. 



2SS 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



May 31, Saturday: "Howard went to Driggs to get some 
roofing for the coop. It rained and hailed like yesterday. 
Vernice came up to Ruby 's at 10 o 'clock. They got stuck in the 
mud on the flat. They brought 50 little chickens for Ruby. 
Howard took the tractor and pulled them out. They did not 
come in. Howard went after Johnnie so we could go to Idaho 
Falls in the morning. 

June 1, Sunday: "We got here at 12:15. We went to the city 
park. Sure had a good dinner. We stayed until 4 o 'clock. Ruby 
and Howard went home. 

June 9, Monday: "I went to the Basin with Amy and Emmett. 
Went to Ruby 's, she was in Driggs. We made us a little dinner. 
They came and brought Maxine with them. She was going to 
stay with Ruby all night. We went over to Stell's for a while, 
then home. 

June 25, Wednesday: "Mrs. Hose came over and told me I 
could get some lard to the relief so I went down with them. Got 
my check for $19.00. Nell came over and stayed all night. We 
went to bed at 10:30 when someone walked in on us. It was 
Ruby, Marlene, and Beverly. They had been to see Luella and 
had gone to Logan. 

August 17, Sunday: "/ went to Sunday School. Amy asked me 
over for dinner. Just got there when here came Ruby, Howard, 
and the kids. Brought a big watermelon. Amy asked them for 
dinner. Then we came over here and had watermelon. Howard 
and the boys went home. Ruby stayed. Ruby and I left the kids 
over to Amy 's and went to meeting. We came home and had 
lunch. 

August 18, Monday: "Ruby and I put up 24 quarts of beets for 
Ruby. Ruby and Amy went to town. Ruby drove Amy 's car. 



289 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



September 20, Saturday: "Ruby and Howard came tonight. 
I went to town with them. We ate lunch, then went to bed. 
Howard went back to town to the show. Howard came home at 
3 o 'clock. After the show, he went down to see Sortor's. Phyllis 
was there so he could not stay. It rained a little tonight. 

September 21, Sunday: "Ruby and Howard went home at 6 
this morning. I did not get up till 7. 

October 4, Saturday: "Ruby and Howard came after me at 
5:20. Howard took Amy out where Emmett was working, he 
came right back. We loaded and went. It sure was raining and 
snowed all the way. 

October 5, Sunday: "It snowed a lot last night. We did not do 
anything all day. Johnnie came over. Ruby had chicken dinner. 

October 6, Monday: "Johnnie, Ruby, and myself went to the 
Falls to get my chickens. We ate dinner in Rigby on Johnnie. 
Sure was good. We started for (Idaho Falls) at 7:00. We ate 
supper with Amy. 

October 7, Tuesday: "/ sewed four slips for Wanda and 
Beverly, and cut out Wanda a coat. Ruby and I went to Ralph 
Moffat's for a surprise party. Sure had a good time. Johnnie 
and Ruby sang some songs. Came home at 1:00. 

October 8, Wednesday: "/ sew a coat for Wanda and a blouse 
for Marlene. Wanda doesn 'tfeel very good. She has a pain in 
her stomach. 

October 9, Thursday: "I sewed Wanda a dress and cut out 
two aprons for Ruby and me. Howard is cutting grain. Stell, 
Orrin, and the kids came over tonight for a little while. Ruby 
bought a bushel of apples off a peddler. 



290 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



October 10, Friday: "/ sewed two aprons for Ruby and me. 
Ruby cleaned house today. Howard went to Rexburg to get the 
wire for the house. 

October 11, Saturday: "Ruby cleaned the front room. We 
went to town with Howard. He got us some root beer and 
baloney. 



Japan bombed Pearl Harbor 

December 7, 1941. U.S. declared war 

on Japan. World War II. 

Massive rationing for war effort. 



October 12, Sunday: "Marlene, Wanda, and myself went to 
Sunday School but there was none so we came home. Ruby and 
I went up to the other place. We got some dirt for our flowers. 
We got stuck. We had dinner then Maxine, Ruby, and I went for 
a long ride. 

December 25, Thursday: "I went over to Amy 's for dinner. 
We ate at 2:00. At 2:30 Johnnie, Mel Larsen, and Ruby, 
Howard, and all the kids came so they ate at Amy 's. Had a nice 
dinner. Johnnie and Mel went to all the club houses in town. 
Ruby and I came over here and put the kids to bed. Jeanice and 
Shirley slept here tonight. We went back over again and played 
Rummy, then Howard and Amy went to 91 and got us orangeade 
and Ruby a hamburger. Then we all played cards till 11:30. 
We came and went to bed. 



Ruby M. Sortor in "The Madsen 

Family." 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



December 26, Friday: "Beverly was sick all night. " 

On May 18, 1942, Ruby gave birth to a "dear little baby girl, 
Ruby Darlene, who died shortly after she was born. " 

The Sortor family was living in Tetonia, Idaho, when Ruby was 
taken to the hospital in Rexburg where she gave birth to a baby 
girl who died at birth. The baby was named Ruby Darlene and 
was buried at Sugar City. 



Conversation. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004-2005) 



(Marlene) "Just a few days after my sixth birthday, my mom 
gave birth to a baby girl who was stillborn. Wanda and I were 
staying with my Uncle Bill and Aunt Mary Sortor and one of 



291 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Ruby Darlene Sortor born 
and died on May 18, 1942. 




Brothers, sisters, and cousins 
at the grave of Ruby Darlene Sortor. 

Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005) 



their girls was pounding on the piano. Aunt Mary scolded her 
and told her to 'be quiet, there was a death in the house. ' 

"It frightened me because I thought she might be talking about 
my mother, and I must have asked her what she was talking 
about because she took me into the bedroom to look at the baby 
lying in her casket. For some reason, when I think about that 
tiny casket, I get the feeling it was made of cardboard." 

(Wanda) "When our baby sister, Ruby Darlene, died they put 
her tiny body in a cardboard box while Grandpa Sortor made a 
little wooden casket for her. He was a very accomplished 
carpenter. I'll never forget them carrying that tiny casket to her 
grave site." 



Conversations. 
(Caron, Marge P., 1996-2005) 



(Marge) "I remember going to see Ruby's little baby. I'm not 
sure who else went with us or anything else about the visit, but 
I remember what a beautiful baby she was." 



Various Conversations. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "Mary Madsen and George and Rose Sortor were good 
friends and Mary was often a guest in their home after they 
moved to Idaho Falls. On one occasion, Rose and Mary spent 
an afternoon applying henna packs to each other's hair. There 
was some henna left over so they decided to dye George's hair, 
which was quite gray at the time. As a result of their mischief, 
his hair was bright red for some time. George was good natured 
about it and went off that evening to play at a dance with his 
new look! The family chuckled about this prank for years. 



"George Sortor constructed several buildings and homes in 
Idaho Falls, including their own home at 1 19 May Street. This 
home was built in 1947, when George was 70 years of age. 
George built most of the homes on the block where they lived. 
Both he and Rose gained great pleasure in gardening and 
George grew the first successful peach tree in Idaho Falls." 



2<)2 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



In 1942, Howard and Ruby moved to Sugar City, Idaho, with 
their six children. Howard worked at the sugar factory and they 
lived in a house just down the street from the factory and across 
the street from the school building. 



Various. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004) 



(Marlene) "When I was eight years old, I remember Grandma 
Madsen taking Mel, Bill, and Bob Trout and me to the 
tabernacle in Idaho Falls where we were baptized members of 
The Church of Jesus Christ of Later-day Saints. None of our 
parents were there and I don't remember why the Trout brothers 
were there either. They were living in Twin Falls at the time 
and we were living in Sugar City, Idaho. I attended second 
grade and part of third grade in Sugar City." 



Mel Trout was 12 years old at the time, Bill Trout was 10, and 
Bob Trout was eight. 



Mary Hansen Madsen, Nellie Madsen 

Standon, Thelma Heath Standon, and 

Sandra Standon all 

died in a boating accident 

July 19, 1943. 

Conversations with Merry F. Shaw. 
(Freeman, Joy F., Undated) 



(Joy) "Our family reunion was usually held close to my 
mother's (Lavina) birthday, which was July 18. We met at the 
park in St. Anthony. Uncle George and Aunt Nell Standon 
stayed the night with Mom and, in the morning, gathered their 
things and said they were going to drive up to Island Park 
Reservoir to go fishing. Grandma Madsen loved to fish and 
asked to go along. The boat developed a leak and slowly sank. 
George and Nell, their son Bill, his wife Thelma, and 
granddaughter, Sandra, were also in the boat when it went 
down. My grandmother died of a heart attack. The only ones 
to survive were Uncle George and Bill. It was really a tragic 
experience." 



Telephone Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2003) 



(Wanda) "Mom was home ironing when Dad came home to tell 
her about Grandma Madsen and Aunt Nell. She was so in 
shock, she just kept ironing and repeating, 'And Nell too. And 
Nell too.'' It was a horrible experience for her." 



Ruby M. Sortor in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Ruby) "Our family continued to grow with Judy Jean born 
June 14, 1945." 



293 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Conversations. 
(Anderson. Marlene S., 2005) 

Judy Jean Sortor 
born June 14, 1945. 



^!7\§ 




Ruby Madsen Sortor. 
Circa 1970s. 



(Marlene) "While we were living in Firth, Mama was very sick 
for a long time. Jeanice Goodson, who was about 13 years old 
then, came and stayed with us to help with all the work. 

"In Spring 1946, Aunt Luella and Uncle Wes brought their three 
boys and came to live with us. Bob and I were 10 at that time, 
Bill was 12, and Mel was 14. Wes was helping with the farming 
and Luella helped Mom with all the cooking and cleaning. Wes 
smoked and had a habit of leaving his cigarettes on the cupboard 
in the kitchen. Bob, Bill, and I decided to try smoking so we 
snuck a cigarette from the pack and scampered out to the old 
sheep camp. We lit up and each took a puff. When it was Bob's 
turn, he inhaled too much and nearly chocked to death. He had 
his head hanging out the back of the camp coughing and 
chocking. We weren't so sure he was going to live. 

"That didn't teach us anything so we tried it again. We gathered 
close to the house and planned how to snatch another of Uncle 
Wes's cigarettes but, when we walked in the house, Uncle Wes 
was sitting in the living room, just watching us. He didn't tell 
on us but that was the end of the smoking. 



"When Uncle Wes and Aunt Luella left our place, they moved 
in with Aunt Amy and Uncle Harold in Shelley." 



Conversation. 
(Campbell, Phil, 2003) 



(Phil) "When Howard and Ruby lived in the Basin, Wanda and 
I became very good friends and continued our friendship by 
becoming pen pals. We often visited when they returned to the 
Basin for a visit. Howard drove a Henry 'J' at that time." 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1947-1951) 



Letter to Merry F. Shaw. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2003) 



(Lavina) Friday, November 25, 1948: "Ruby's home burned 
down last Tuesday. Will and I went up to see them." 

(Marlene) "What pictures Mom had were destroyed when our 
home burned to the ground when I was 13 years old. We lost 
everything. We also moved around a lot when I was younger. 
I think by the time I was 15 we had moved 12 or 13 times. 



294 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



"Many of those moves were to new towns and new schools.' 



Telephone Conversation. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "Dad carried a baby picture of me in his wallet and that 
is the only picture of me that survived the fire." 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "In March 1951, Daddy decided to try something 
different than farming so we moved to Pocatello, Idaho. We 
lived in a basement apartment at 466 E. Pine Street. Daddy 
went to Alaska to work. Delmer and Ella moved to Pocatello, 
too, and they lived in an apartment on Ninth Street. Delmer 
went to work at Wes Vaco. I enrolled at Pocatello High School 
and finished ninth grade. Marlene didn't go to school the rest 
of that year but started her sophomore year over the next year 
with me. She quit after a couple of months. 



Sandra Lee Sortor 
born July 31, 1951. 



"On July 31, 1951, Sandra Lee was born. She was a sweet baby. 
Aunt Luella called her Sammy. Aunt Luella and Mama were so 
close and Aunt Luella was always there when Mama needed 
her. 




"When Sandra was only a couple of months old, Judy came 
down with scarlet fever. She was only six and she was very 
sick. Mama had the Elders come and administer to her. Right 
after they left she started to feel better. Mama also got scarlet 
fever but she wasn't nearly as sick as Judy had been. 

"In June 1952, Mama went to Anchorage, Alaska, to be with 
Daddy. She took Judy and Sandra with her. JoAnn Marshall, 
LaVerl's fiance, also went. LaVerl was working in Alaska and 
they planned to be married once she got there. Mama left 
Marlene, Beverly, and me at home. The Andersons that lived 
above us were to look after us. Delmer and Ella and Aunt 
Luella also agreed to look after the three of us. At that time, we 
were 17, 15, and 13. Dad and Mom came home in September 
just before school started." 



Amy and Ruby at the Eastern Idaho 

State Fair. 



After that, the family moved to Alameda, Idaho, and Howard 
was hired as a patrolman for the Alameda Police Department. 



295 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Later, he was hired to work for the Alameda Fire Department 
and became the fire chief. Then on June 2, 1955, Howard was 
also hired to be the police chief and held both positions of 
leadership for several years. 



Luella Colleen born August 23, 1953. 



Richard Leslie born July 25, 1955. 



The police and fire departments were located at 429 Washington 
Avenue in the township of Alameda. 

"Howard worked both of these positions until Alameda was 
annexed to the city of Pocatello. He also bought and managed 
several businesses. 



Ruby M. Sortor in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1958-1961) 



(Ruby) " Luella Colleen was born August 23, 1 953; and Richard 
Leslie was born July 25, 1955." 

(Lavina) Tuesday, November 18, 1958: "Johnnie and Ruby 
came this afternoon. Stayed for supper. Johnnie bought the 
harness. 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte, Lavina M., 1963-1967) 



(Lavina) Saturday, July 2, 1966: "Went up to Temple. Ruby 
and Howard went through. Stell, Vernice, Dorothy, Anna, Will, 
Merlyn, and L We all ate dinner with Amy and Harold. " 



Luella Viola Madsen Trout 
died November 26, 1966. 



On November 26, 1966, Luella Viola Madsen Trout passed 
away at Pocatello, Idaho. She and Ruby had been very close 
throughout their lives. 



Five Year Diary. 
(Whyte. Lavina M., 1968-1972) 

Anna Christina Madsen Thorsted 
died September 9, 1969. 

Johnnie William Madsen 
died September 3, 1972. 



(Lavina) Saturday, April 6, 1968: "Had a birthday dinner for 
Ruby. Beverly, Marlene, Bud, Amy, Harold, DeLoy, and Shirley 
were here. " 

On September 3, 1972, Johnnie William Madsen passed away 
following a sudden heart attack. He was at home in his little 
trailer when he died. 



296 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



Uncle Johnnie. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "Uncle Johnnie played a very important role in our 
family. He and mom were exceptionally close. Mom grieved 
hard when Uncle Johnnie passed away. She literally fainted at 
the grave site." 



Various conversations. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 




Sisters: Ruby, Amy, Stella, and 

Lavina. 
Circa 1985. 



(Judy) "When I was young, I just loved the mineral water from 
Hooper Springs. My grandmother made root beer with it. 
There probably isn't enough gold to bribe me to drink it now. 

"My mother was very spiritual and very wise. She was a 
woman of few words but her words often had deep meaning. 
For example, on the eve of my wedding, I expected my mom to 
give me a little talk about the marriage night and so on, but my 
mom's advise to me was to remember I had a name and I should 
make my husband use it. I later knew she was telling me to 
maintain my own identity and not lose who I was in being 
someone's wife. And, when motherhood came to me, she meant 
that the title 'Mom' or 'Mother' was reserved for my children. 
The responsibilities of marriage and motherhood should not take 
away a woman's self-worth but should enhance it. That little 
talk has stayed with me for a lifetime. 




"A few years later, Mom and Marlene came to visit me in 
Illinois. We visited Nauvoo and had a marvelous time. The 
storms in Illinois are a bit more severe than in Idaho. Mom was 
very frightened by the lightning and thunder. Of course, my 
family was used to it and slept through everything, which was 
difficult for Mom to understand." 



Wanda and Beverly pictured with the 
Alameda fire truck. Circa 1953. 



In late 1976, Ruby slipped and fell as she was walking down 
Nada Lane on her way home from work, resulting in a broken 
hip. She was rushed to St. Anthony Hospital in Pocatello where 
she underwent surgery. She was still in the hospital when Ricky 
and Pam Deeg were married on January 21, 1977, so they were 
married at the hospital and again later at the reception hall. 



297 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



(Amy) "On Wednesday, Mell Larsen and I drove to Pocatello. 
He stayed with Howard while I went to my ceramics class. On 
Thursday afternoon, I brought Ruby home with me for the night. 
Then on Friday, we went down to see Lavina in Groveland, then 
back to Pocatello. Howard had dinner ready when we got there. 
He made good hot stew. I was so glad, because we were 
starved." 



A Mother's True Story. 
(Child, Amy M, 1971) 



Howard not only cooked, he liked to watch boxing, politics, 
current affairs, and enjoyed rodeos. He walked with a group of 
friends called the Pine Ridge Pacers and loved gardening, yard 
work, and horseback riding. But Howard truly enjoyed farming. 
He loved the Soda Springs area and dreamed of returning there. 
He realized his dream when, in 1992, he and Ruby moved to 
Soda Springs. However, it was a short stay. Ruby's health 
forced them to return to Pocatello where several of their 
daughters lived and could help with her care. 



Various. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "My mom had the same sebaceous cysts on her scalp that 
her mother had and so do two of her daughters. Mom suffered 
a massive stroke in about 1992, which began a very hard six- 
year struggle. My father's true character became very evident 
during the next few years until his death. He was so devoted to 
my mom and tried so hard to make her life enjoyable." 



Conversation. 
(Henson, Beverly S., 2005b) 



Lavina Marie Madsen 
died February 4, 1991. 



(Beverly) "When Mom got out of the hospital, Delmer came by 
the house every day and walked her to help speed her recovery. 
His wife, Nadine, also came and helped. Mom loved Nadine. 
Before she had her stroke, she and Nadine went to church 
together every Sunday. 

"My sisters and I also took turns helping Mom. When I helped 
her shower and such, I always joked with her to help her cope 
with her embarrassment. She told me I had way too much of 
Aunt Luella in me. And when I cleaned her house, she told me 
I was too much like Aunt Anna, always cleaning. But that's 
how I am." 



2 ( >X 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



Various. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2005) 



(Marlene) "My mom never wanted grey hair. As I grew a bit 
older and my heart problems became more severe, coloring my 
hair was just too much work (besides which it doesn't do your 
hair any good), so I had it cut short to remove all the colored 
ends and left it grey. 



Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005) 



"When Mom saw me she told me I'd better get it colored; she 
i couldn 't possibly have a daughter with white hair. ' Right up 
to the end of her life, we helped her keep her hair colored." 

(Wanda) "For many years, Mom collected dolls, which she 
displayed around her home. I loved her doll collection and have 
spent many years collecting dolls of my own. My doll 
collection is displayed all around my home, just like Mom used 
to." 



Howard Leslie Sortor 
died November 17, 1997. 



On November 17, 1997, Howard Leslie Sortor suffered a heart 
attack and passed away at Bannock Regional Hospital in 
Pocatello, Idaho. He was interred at Soda Springs, Idaho, near 
his family. 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
died September 10, 1998. 



On September 10, 1998, Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor passed away 
at the home of her daughter, Colleen, at Pocatello, Idaho. She 
is buried in the Soda Springs Cemetery alongside Howard. 



Howard Delmer Sortor married Ella Marie Burwell on 
November 9, 1947. They have four children: Sandra, Shelley, 
Shirlene; and Stacy. On September 10, 1964, Ella passed away. 
On March 30, 1968, Delmer married Nadine. Delmer and 
Nadine live in Pocatello, Idaho. 

LaVerl Dean Sortor married JoAnn E. Marshall in June 1951 . 
They adopted two sons: Stephen and Michael. JoAnn passed 
away April 7, 1999. 

Dale George Sortor married Beverly Robinson. They had five 
children: Ronald, Donald, Rodney (Bim), Renae, and Rocky. 
They were later divorced and Dale married Jean Sanders 



299 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



DiVesti. Jean had three children from a previous marriage: 
Connie, John, and Vic. Dale and Jean had three children: 
Debbie, Sheila, and Justin. Justin was shot and killed when he 
was 20 years old. Dale and Jean were later divorced but 
remained good friends. Dale passed away on February 12, 
2004. 

Erma Marlene Sortor was born May 8, 1935. She married 
LaMont C. (Bud) Anderson on September 25, 1952. Bud was 
born July 12, 1931, at Fair View, Wyoming. The couple have 
two sons, LaMont Randy and John Anderson, and seven 
grandchildren. 

Wanda Lou Sortor was born November 13, 1936. She married 
Orville Raymond Bock. They are the parents of three 
daughters: Vicki Lou, Barbara Jean (Bobbi), and Sheri Jo; and 
six grandchildren. 

Beverly Joyce Sortor was born September 14, 1938. She 
married Austin Ray gene Henson. They are the parents of four 
children: Darla Rae Arnold, James Leslie Henson, Danny Ray 
Henson, and Kimberly Jo Henson. Beverly and Ray have six 
grandchildren. 

Ruby Darlene Sortor was born and died on May 18, 1942. 

Judy Jean Sortor was born June 14, 1945. She married Dan 
Craig Gillies and the couple have four sons: Dan Sheldon, 
David Craig, Anthony Samuel, and Robert Christian. They 
were later divorced. Judy has five grandchildren. 

Sandra Lee Sortor was born July 31, 1951. She married David 
Tarbet. They have two children: Stephanie and John. 

Luella Colleen Sortor was born August 23, 1953. She is 
married to Michael VanLeuven. The couple had three 
daughters: Brandy (who died at birth), Kate, and Emily. 



M)() 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 



Richard Leslie Sortor married Pamela Kay Deeg. Pam had 

one daughter, Amanda Deeg. Rick helped raise Amanda and he 
and Pamela had two sons: Ricky and Troy. Rick and Pam were 
later divorced and he married Tiare Maher Ferguson. Tiare had 
a son, Lance Ferguson, and Rick helped raise him as well. 




Ruby Sortor and Amy Child at the old Madsen Homestead in Tetonia, Idaho. Easter Sunday. 

Circa 1973. Courtesy Rick Sortor. 



301 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Ruby Nada (upper right) 
with Merry Powell, age two 
and one-half. Taken at the 
Powell home at the Swan 
place in St. Anthony. 
Circa 1931. Courtesy Merry 
F. Shaw. 

Ruby Nada (far right) 
some time before her 
marriage to Howard Sortor. 




These five sisters (lower left) appear to be having a 
fun summer day. Pictured from L to R: Ruby 
Nada, Lavina Marie, Luella Viola, Amy Pearl, and 
Velna Syble. 




Shown in the photo at lower right, L to R, are Ruby 
Nada, Lavina Marie, Velna Syble, Luella Viola, and 
Amy Pearl. Both pictures circa 1932. Courtesy Merry 
F. Shaw. 




302 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 




On May 18, 1942, Ruby Nada Sortor gave birth to a baby girl whom they named Ruby Darlene. The 
tiny girl died shortly after birth. Shown at her grave site are her brothers, sisters, and cousins. Back 
row, L to R: Delmer Sortor, LaVerl Sortor, Elvin Goodson, Doris Standen, Geneal Douglass, Ilene 
Douglass, and Jeanice Goodson. Front row, L to R: Shirley Hubbard, Barbara Sortor, Marlene 
Sortor, Beverly Sortor, Connie Hubbard, Wanda Sortor, and Bonnie Hubbard. Not pictured was 
Dale Sortor who went to the car crying. Circa 
1942. Courtesy Merry F. Shaw. 

The photo at left is inscribed: "At Ruby's, 1943." 

The building in the background is the two-story 

grade school located across the street from the 

Sortor home and a short distance from the old 

sugar factory in Sugar City. Pictured are, back 

row L to R: Lew Trout, Johnnie Madsen, Grant 

Powell, Luella Madsen Trout, and Wes Trout. 

Middle row, L to R: Maxine Douglass Trout, 

Howard Sortor, Stella Madsen Douglass, Ruby 

Madsen Sortor, Lavina Madsen Powell, Marge 

Powell, and Amy Madsen Hubbard. Front row, 

L to R: Vernice Douglass and Virgil Powell. This picture was taken shortly after the funerals for 

Mary Madsen, Nell Madsen Standen, Thelma Heath Standen, and Sandra Standen. Courtesy Merry 

F. Shaw. 



c 

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(-r 
I — 

Cfl 
X 

IXi 

;: ' 




303 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




While attending a Madsen family reunion in about 1950, the men (above) posed for the camera. 
They are (back row, L to R) Howard Sortor, Orrin Douglass, and Paul Bluhme; and (front row, L to 
R): Will Whyte, and Harold Thorsted. The Madsen sisters (below) took their turn as well. L to R: 
Lavina Whyte, Amy Child, Stella Douglass, Anna Thorsted, Ruby Sortor, and Luella Trout. 




304 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 




Amy Pearl and Ruby Nada (above) 
were very close and spent a great deal 
of time together enjoying the mountains 
they loved. 

They are shown (upper right) in 
matching shirts, probably created by 
Amy Pearl. 

The four (at right) surviving sisters 
from the Madsen family are: L to R: 
Ruby Nada Sortor, Amy Pearl Child, 
Stella Rose Douglass, and Lavina Marie 
Whyte. Circa 1989. 

All photos courtesy Merry F. Shaw. 




AMY PEARL—RUBY NADA 




305 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Pictured at left are six of the 
Madsen children, L to R: Ruby 
Sortor, Johnnie Madsen, Luella 
Trout, Stella Douglass, Amy 
Child, and Anna Thorsted. 
Circa 1956. Courtesy Wanda 
Lou Bock. 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
passed away on September 10, 
1998. The program for her 
funeral is shown below. 
Courtesy Wanda Lou Bock. 



In Loving Memory Of 




April 4, 1915 
Cache, Idaho 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 



September 10, 1998 
Focatello, Idaho 



Funeral Services 

1 1 :00 am -Saturday, September 12, 1998 

225 Oakvvood LDS Chapel 

Pocatello, Idaho 

Services directed by Colonial Funeral Home 

Burial 

Fairview Cemetery 
Soda Springs, Idaho 



Service 

Family Prayer Jayson Corpus 

Pre and Postlude Music Lana Borgholphaus 

Invocation Jannelle Chavarria 

"How Great Thou Art" 

Congregational Hymn Pg. 86 
Speaker Judy J. Gillies 

"When I Take My Vacation In Heaven" 

Dr. Ryan Anderson 

Speaker j onn Hansen 

"/ Know That My Redeemer Lives" 

Congregational Hymn Pg. 136 

Closing Prayer Marcus Chavarria 

Grave Dedication Dewey Anderson 

Casket Bearers 

UMont Anderson John Tarbet 

MikeVanLeuven Robert Gillies 

David Tarbet Dan Gillies 

Honorary Casket Bearers 

Richard Leslie Sortor 



306 



Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard Leslie Sortor 




OBITUARIES 

Howard Sortor 

POCATELLO - Howard Leslie 
Sortor, 92, died Tuesday, November 18, 
1997 at a local medical center. 

He was born May 5, 1905, the sec- 
ond of five children of George Henry 
and Rose May Hart Sortor in Soda 
Springs, Idaho. In his youth he moved 
to Hagerman, 
Idaho, where he 
was involved in 
tanning and as a 
ranch hand. 

In 1928 he 
married Lucy 
Higley; three 
sons were born of 
this union. She 
preceded him in 
death. On Au- 
gust 8, 1934 he 
married Ruby 
Madsen in Rigby, Idaho. They were 
later sealed in the Idaho Falls LDS 
Temple in 1966. 

He farmed in the Salem, Idaho 
Falls, Firth and the American Falls 
areas. He also worked construction in 
Anchorage, Alaska. In 1951 he moved 
to Pocatello, and was the chief of police 
in Alameda until the time of the 
Pocatello annexation. 

He was a businessman and owned 
several businesses, but loved farming 
the best. He enjoyed walking with his 
friends, the Pine Ridge Pacers. Howard 
was a member of the LDS Foothill 
Ward. He enjoyed watching boxing, 
politics, current affairs, rodeos, garden- 
ing and yard work, and horseback rid- 
ing. For the past five years he cared for 
his wife of 63 years. 

He is survived by his wife, Ruby; six 
daughters, Sandra Tarbet (Dave) of 
Soda Springs, Colleen VanLueven 
(Mike), Judy Gillies, Wanda Bock 
(Orville), Marlene Anderson (LaMont), 
Beverly Henson (Ray), all of Pocatello; 
four sons, Verl D. Sortor tJoAnn) of 
Winnemucca, Nev., Howard D. Sortor 
(Nadine) of Pocatello, Dale G. Sortor of 
McCammon, Richard Leslie Sortor 
(liana) of Las Vegas, Nev.; and a 
younger brother, Bill Sortor. He was 
preceded in death by his first wife, one 
daughter. Ruby Darlene, two grand- 
sons and one granddaughter. He had 
35 grandchildren and 51 great-grand- 
children. 

Funeral services were held Friday, 
Nov. 21, 11 a.m., at the Foothill LDS 
Ward Chapel on 225 Oakwood Drive, 
Bishop Houghton officiating. A viewing 
was held at the church from 9:30 a.m. 
until 10:45 a.m. prior to the service. 
Services are under the direction of the 
Colonial Funeral Home, Interment was 
in the Soda Springs Cemetery. 



Howard Sortor 

Service Held 

I 

l Funeral services were held 

( Friday, Nov. 21, at the Foothill 

I LDS Ward chapel in Pocatello, for 

Howard Leslie Sortor, 92, who died 

Tuesday, Nov. 18, 1997 at a local 

medical center in Pocatello from a 

: heart attack. Burial was in the 

jFairview Cemetery in the Soda 

[Springs Cemetery, under the 

I direction of the Colonial Funeral 

[ Home. 

Howard was born May 5, 1905 
in Soda Springs, the second of five 
children of George Henry and Rose 
jMay Hart Sortor. In his youth he 
• moved with his family to 
» Hagerman, where he was involved 
| in farming and as a ranch hand. 

In 1927 he married Lucy Higley. 
They had three sons. Lucy died in 
i 1933. He married Ruby Nada 
:Madsen Aug. 8, 1934. They were 
isealed in the Idaho Falls Temple in 
;T966. They had seven daughters 
'.and one son. 

Sonor farmed in the Salem, 
(Idaho Falls, Firth and American 
[Falls areas. He also worked 

i 

^construction in Anchorage, Alaska. 
In 1951 he moved to Pocatello and 
was chief of police in Alameda 
until the time of the Pocatello 
annexation. He was a businessman 
and owned several businesses, but 
loved farming best 

Howard loved Soda Springs and 
had dreamed of moving back 
someday. This dream was realized 
when he and his wife, Ruby, moved 
to Soda Springs in 1992. The dream 
was short lived, however, when 
after a short time here Ruby 
suffered a stroke requiring hospital- 
ization and extensive therapy. A 
decision was made to return to 
Pocatello where they had five 
daughters and it was more 
convenient for treatments? Howard 
was able to care for his wife at 



home with help from their 
daughters, until his death. 

He is survived by his wife of 
Pocatello; six daughters, Sandra 
(Dave) Tarbet of Soda Springs, 
Marlene (Buc) Anderson, Wanda 
(Orville) Bock, Beverly (Ray) 
Henson, Judy Gillies, Colleen 
(Mike) Van Leuven, all of 
Pocatello; four sons, Howard D. 
(Nadine) Sortor, Pocatello, La Verl 
(Joanne) Sortor, Winnemucca, NV, 
Dale G. Sortor, McCammon, 
Richard Leslie (Tiare) Sortor, Las 
Vegas; and one brother, William 
Sortor of Logan. He was preceded 
in death by one daughter, Ruby' 
Darlene, two grandsons, one 
granddaughter, his parents, one 
sister, Alma Hendrickson, and two 
brothers, Syral and Frank Sortor. 
He had 35 grandchildren and 51 
great-grandchildren. 

Bishop Glen Houghton 
officiated for the funeral services. 
The family prayer was offered by a 
grandson-in-law, Tioni Valli. The 
invocation was by Fred Applington 
and benediction by John Hansen. 

Tributes were given by Judy J. 
Gillies, family and friends. A poem 
written by his daughter Beverly was 
read by a grandson Jason. A 
nephew, Vernes Douglas, shared 
fond memories of his Uncle 
Howard. 

Linda Anderson and sister-in- 
law, Marlene Hall, sang a duet, 
Silver Haired Daddy of Mine. 
Speaker was Bob Allen, followed 
by congregational singing, God Be 
With You. 

Casket bearers were grandsons, 
John Tarbet, Thorny and Robert 
Gillies, Danny Henson, Ricky and 
Troy Sortor. Honorary bearers were 
Howard's sons, Richard, Howard, 
LaVerl and Dale Sortor. 

Dedication of the grave was by 
Jason Corpus. 






Above are two obituaries printed in the local newspapers for Howard Leslie Sortor who passed away 
on November 18, 1997. Courtesy Wanda Lou Bock and Beverly Joyce Henson. 



307 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Luella Viola Madsen Trout, Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor, and Amy Pearl Madsen Child pose together. 
The three sisters were very close and many happy hours were spent together. Circa 1965. Courtesy 
Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



308 



Chapter 15 

HOWARD DELMER SORTOR, 

ELLA MARIE BURWELL, 

AND NADINE BROWER 




Howard Delmer Sortor and 

Ella Marie Burwell Sortor 

on their wedding day 

and a few years later. 



■ ■■■'■■; 



Information for this chapter provided 

by various family members. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Lucy May Higley 

Born: 19 Jun 1909, Hibbard, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 9 Sep 1933, St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 1 7 Nov 1 997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Howard Delmer Sortor 

Born: 30 May 1 928, Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Ella Marie Burwell 



Born: 13 Oct 1928, 



., Idaho 



Died: 10 Sep 1964, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Sandra Sortor 

Born: 18 Mar 1950, Vancouver, Clark, Washington 
Died: Living 



Shelley Sortor 

Born: 24 Sep 1957, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Shirlene Sortor 

Born: 30 Mar 1959, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Stacy Sortor 

Born: 7 Aug 1960, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Nadine Brower 



Born: 



., Idaho 



Died: Living 



Phillip Andrew Dunn 

Born: 6 Oct 1963, 



_, Idaho 



Died: 31 Dec 1968, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Howard Delmer Sortor, Ella Marie Burwell, and Nadine Brower 

HOWARD DELMER SORTOR 



1928 



Howard Delmer Sortor 
born May 30, 1928. 

LaVerl Dean Sortor 
born July 25, 1929. 

Dale George Sortor 
born August 28, 1930. 

Lucy May Higley Sortor 
died September 9, 1933. 




Howard Delmer Sortor. 

Notes. 
(Sortor, H. Delmer, 2005) 



On September 13, 1927, Howard Leslie Sortor married Lucy 
May Higley, the daughter of Alfred Dewey and Bessie Hart 
Higley. Lucy May was born at Hibbard, Madison County, 
Idaho, on June 19, 1909. Howard Leslie was born May 5, 1905, 
at Soda Springs, Caribou County, Idaho. The couple were 
blessed with three sons: Howard Delmer, born May 30, 1928, 
at Richvale, Teton County, Idaho; LaVerl Dean, born July 25, 
1 929, at Richvale, Teton County, Idaho; and Dale George, born 
August 28, 1930, at Richvale, Teton County, Idaho. 

Howard moved his family from the Basin to either Sugar City 
or St. Anthony. On September 9, 1933, Lucy May Higley 
Sortor gave birth to a tiny baby girl at St. Anthony, Idaho; both 
mother and baby died. Lucy was laid to rest in Sugar City, 
Madison, Idaho. 

(Delmer) "My first meeting with the Madsen family was early 
spring 1934. They were seated around a crowded table in a very 
small kitchen in the log house in the community of Cache. 
Little did I know that, later, Ruby would become my 
stepmother. 

"I don't think Ruby and I liked each other much during the early 
years. However, later on she became a true friend that I loved 
and respected. 



c 

« 

■ 



"Those of Ruby's siblings who had a big part in shaping my 
early life included Stella, Anna, Amy, Luella, and last but not 
least, Johnnie. And of course, Velna. She was a happy fun- 
loving individual. What I remember most about her was how 
good she always treated me. 

"Because of the union between Dad and Ruby, I gained six 
wonderful sisters: Marlene, Wanda, Beverly, Judy, Sandra, and 
Colleen. And another great brother, Ricky." 



311 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Ruby M. Sortor in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 

Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard 
Leslie Sortor married August 8, 1934. 

Erma Marlene Sortor 
born May 8, 1935. 

Wanda Lou Sortor 
born November 13, 1936. 



(Ruby) "I married Howard Leslie Sortor on August 8, 1934, at 
the court house in Rexburg, Idaho. He had three little boys 
when we were married: Delmer, age 6; LaVerl, age 5; and Dale, 
age 4." 

Howard farmed in the Sugar City area for a few years and 
during this time Ruby gave birth to two little girls: Erma 
Marlene was born May 8, 1935; and Wanda Lou was born 
November 13, 1936. In about 1937, Howard moved his growing 
family to Teton Basin where they lived at the Martin place and 
later in the home owned by Mary Madsen. 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



Beverly Joyce Sortor 
born September 14, 1938. 

U.S. declared war on Germany 

in 1940. 

Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor 

December 7, 1941. 

U.S. declared War on Japan. 

Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 



Ruby Darlene Sortor born 
and died on May 18, 1942. 



(Marlene) "Delmer has always been a very good, big brother to 
me. He saved my life once. Wanda was just a baby so I would 
have been about two. From what I was told, I was swinging on 
the pump handle or something and fell down the well. Delmer 
was watching and ran into the house and got Daddy. He jumped 
in the well and pulled me out." 

Howard and Ruby moved back to Sugar City and were living 
there in 1938 when their third daughter, Beverly Joyce, was 
born on September 14. 

Mary Madsen kept a diary in 1941, and mentioned that someone 
had come into her house and eaten some of her biscuits and 
donuts. A few days later she wrote that it was Delmer, Dale, 
and a friend of theirs who ate the food. She expressed relief that 
she wasn't robbed and the boys had found some good food to 
eat. For Christmas that year, she recorded Howard and Ruby 
and their six children coming for dinner. Dinner was at Amy's, 
who lived just across the street, and then everyone, including 
Uncle Johnnie and Uncle Mel, went to Grandma Madsen's. She 
lived in a tiny house so conditions were certainly crowded. 

On May 18, 1942, Ruby gave birth to a baby girl who died at 
birth. They named her Ruby Darlene. She was laid to rest in 
Sugar City, Idaho. Delmer turned 14 on May 30 of that year. 



$12 



Howard Delmer Sortor, Ella Marie Burwell, and Nadine Brower 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Dorothy and Vernice, 2005) 



(Dorothy) "Delmer was in eighth grade when Howard and Ruby 
moved to Sugar City in 1942. He wanted to stay in the Basin 
and finish school so it was arranged that he would live with 
Orrin and Stella Madsen Douglass. When it came time for 
graduation, Delmer lacked clothes for the occasion, so Orrin 
bought him what he needed. His parents did not attend his 
graduation. I don't think he attended any school after that." 



Mary Hansen Madsen, Nellie Madsen 

Standen, Thelma Heath Standen, and 

Sandra Standen drowned at Island 

Park Reservoir July 19, 1943. 




Howard Delmer Sortor as a 
young boy in school. 

Judy Jean Sortor 
born June 14, 1945. 



On July 19, 1943, Delmer's beloved Grandmother Mary 
Madsen, drowned in a boating accident on Island Park 
Reservoir. Nellie Madsen Standen, Mary's daughter, Thelma 
Heath Standen, Mary's granddaughter-in-law, and Sandra 
Standen, Thelma's daughter, also drowned. This was a great 
loss to the family. 

In Spring 1944, Howard moved his family to a farm outside 
Firth, Idaho. The younger children attended school here and 
Delmer probably helped his father with the farming. 

World War II was just coming to a close when Delmer joined 
the Marines in 1945. He was 17 years old. 

When Delmer completed his tour of duty in the Marines, he 
returned to his parent's home and again farmed with his father. 
Howard and Ruby were then farming at Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

HOWARD DELMER SORTOR AND ELLA MARIE 
BURWELL 

Delmer met and married Ella Marie Burwell on November 9, 
1947. 



c 

r 

■ 






Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Marlene) "After Delmer and Ella were married, they lived just 
down the road from us not too far from Fielding Memorial 
Cemetery. They had an old car and I wanted to drive. Even 
though I was only about 13, Ella agreed to let me try. I had 
driven tractors before but it's not the same. I had to back out of 



313 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



the driveway and then turn quickly because there was a really 
big, deep canal on the other side of the road. When I backed 
out, my foot missed the brake and hit the gas. That car sped 
backwards right into the canal and ended up nearly 
perpendicular. 

"We weren't hurt but we were scared to death and badly shaken. 
Irrigation season was over and, luckily, there wasn't much water 
in the canal or we might have drowned. We were afraid to tell 
Delmer so Ella said she would tell him she was driving and just 
got dizzy somehow and backed into the canal. It was a long 
time before he found out it was really me. That was my first and 
last driving experience for a long time." 



Interview. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005) 



(Wanda) "Ella was like a big sister to us. We loved her a lot and 
she was so much fun. After they were married, they lived in a 
little house about a half mile away on our farm." 



Sandra Lee Sortor 
born July 31, 1951. 

Luella Colleen Sortor 
born August 23, 1953. 



"Two days before Thanksgiving 1948, our house burned down 
in the middle of the night. We lost everything except the new 
winter coats Mama had just bought for us. In March 1949, we 
moved to a farm in American Falls, Idaho. Delmer and Ella 
moved with us and lived in a little house next to ours. 

"In 1951, Daddy gave up farming and moved us to Pocatello. 
He went to Alaska to work. Delmer and Ella moved to 
Pocatello, too, and they lived in an apartment on Ninth Street. 
Delmer went to work at Wes Vaco." 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Marlene) "My brother, Delmer, worked at FMC and he and his 
wife were good friends with Bud's sister, Alice Donetta 
Anderson. Bud had just gotten out of the Army and hadn't been 
home very long. One night they introduced Bud and me and 
took us to a movie. I was only 1 6 and Bud was 2 1 . That's how 
I met my future husband. 



314 



Howard Delmer Sortor, Ella Marie Burwell, and Nadine Brower 



Ella Marie Burwell Sortor 
died September 10, 1964. 




Delmer with a big catch. 

Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



"Delmer and Ella had four children: three daughters, Sandra, 
Shelley, and Shirlene; and one son, Stacy. Stacy was only three 
years old when Ella suffered a heart attack and died on 
September 10, 1964. She was just 35 years of age. For the next 
few years, Delmer raised his four children alone. 

Four years after Ella's death Delmer met and married Nadine 
Brower. Nadine had a young son from a previous marriage, 
Phillip Andrew Dunn. Phillip was born October 6, 1963. 

HOWARD DELMER SORTOR AND NADINE BROWER 

Delmer and Nadine were married March 30, 1968. 

(Marlene) "In April, just three weeks after Delmer and Nadine 
were married, her little boy was diagnosed with kidney cancer. 
He died on December 31,1 968." 



i 



Howard Leslie Sortor 
died November 1, 1997. 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
died September 10, 1998. 



Delmer and Nadine lived and worked in Pocatello, Bannock, 
Idaho. Nadine and Ruby were good friends and attended church 
together every Sunday. Ruby loved Nadine very much. 

After Ruby went home from the hospital following her stroke, 
Delmer and Nadine visited her every day. They helped her up 
and walked with her to help build her strength. Following the 
death of Howard Leslie Sortor, Delmer and Nadine helped even 
more with Ruby's care. 



Notes. 
(Sortor, H. Delmer, 2005) 



(Delmer) "At the time of this writing, the grand total of my 
descendants is: children — 5; grandchildren —11; and great 
grandchildren — 10 and 1/3." 



Sandra Sortor, born March 18, 1950, is married to Eric Empey. 
They have two daughters and three sons: 

John Wesley Empey was born September 6, 1974. He 
married Sherry Jean and they have five daughters: Samantha 



315 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Eloise Mayo, born November 26, 1988; Cassandra Rose Mayo, 
born December 4, 1990; Wylynn Monroe, born March 8, 1993; 
Bailey Kaylynn Empey, born April 8, 1997; and Jennefer Jorden 
Empey, born May 8, 1998. 

Amy Marie Empey was born November 18, 1975. She 
married Steve Webb, born November 5, 1964. They have 
two daughters and one son: Joanee Beebe, born August 29, 
1991; Daniel Beebe, born October 27, 1993; and Sydni 
Webb, born August 16, 2001. They are expecting a fourth 
child in early May 2006. 

Joshua Saul Empey was born January 27, 1978. 

Mariha Michelle Berrett was born September 3, 1980, and 
is married to Scott Lee Bales, born September 8, 1972. They 
have two sons: Deacon Jackson Berrett, born May 9, 2000; 
and Michial Zane Bales, born June 7, 2005. 

Ferron James Empey was born June 30, 1982. 

Shelley Sortor Smith was born September 24, 1957. She has 
one daughter, Cashell Marie, born January 13, 1986. 

Shirlene Sortor was born March 30, 1959. She is married to 
Tioane Johnney Poni Tufuga Valai. They have two children: 
Cassandra Sariah Valai, born August 10, 1991; and Auro Stacy 
Poni Tufuga Valai, born August 11, 1993. 

Stacy Delmer Sortor was born August 7, 1960. Stacy has three 
children: Ella Marie Sortor, born January 23, 1982; Travis 
Howard Sortor, born March 17, 1983; and Sutton Leslie Sortor, 
born July 8, 1985. 

Phillip Andrew Dunn was born October 6, 1963. He died from 
kidney cancer on December 31,1 968. 



316 



Howard Delmer Sortor, Ella Marie Burwell, and Nadine Brower 




Howard Leslie Sortor (above, right) with his first 
wife, Lucy May Higley, and a cousin. The couple 
were married September 13, 1927. 



Delmer's grandparents, Alfred Dewey and Bessie 
Hart Higley (at right), on their wedding day, 
November 24, 1904, at Soda Springs, Caribou 
County, Idaho. Alfred Dewey Higley was born 
December 20, 1882. Bessie Hart was born 
November 20, 1887, at Blue Hills, Webster 
County, Nebraska. They are the parents of Lucy 
May Higley, who was born June 19, 1909. Circa 
1904. Courtesy Wanda Lou Bock and Beverly 
Joyce Henson. 






317 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




f *£ *£jb 



. f- 



Lucy May Higley (above left) and Howard Leslie Sortor with their three young boys at their home in 
Teton Basin. Lucy is holding Dale George, born August 28, 1930; Howard is holding LaVerl Dean, 
born July 25, 1929; Howard Delmer, born May 30, 1928, is standing between his parents. Circa 
1931. The three boys (upper right) lost their mother on September 9, 1933. Circa 1934. 



On September 12, 1998, the 
brothers (right) attended 
funeral services for their step- 
mother, Ruby Nada Madsen 
Sortor, in Pocatello, Idaho. 
They are, L to R: Delmer, 
Dale, and LaVerl Sortor. 



All pictures courtesy Wanda 
Lou Bock. 




318 



Chapter 16 
LAVERL DEAN SORTOR 

AND 
JO ANN E. MARSHALL 





X'. 



X. 

::• 
u 



LaVerl Dean and Howard Delmer Sortor (back row). 
Wanda Lou, Beverly Joyce, and Erma Marlene Sortor (middle row). 

Judy Jean Sortor (front). 



Information for this chapter provided by 

various family members. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Lucy May Higley 

Born: 1 9 Jun 1 909, Hibbard, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 9 Sep 1933, St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 1 7 Nov 1 997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



LaVerl Dean Sortor 

Born: 25 Jul 1929, Driggs, Teton, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: JoAnn E. Marshall 

Born: 5 Jun 1934, Salina, Sevier, Utah 

Died: 7 Apr 1999, Winnemucca, Humboldt, Nevada 



Stephen Sortor 

Born: 1 1 Feb 1964, Reno, Washoe, Nevada 
Died: Living 



Michael Sortor 

Born: 7 Sep 1966, Reno, Washoe, Nevada 
Died: Living 



LaVerl Dean Sortor and JoAnn E. Marshall 



LAVERL DEAN SORTOR 



1929 



LaVerl Dean Sortor 
born July 25, 1929. 




LaVerl Dean and his dad, 
Howard Sortor. 



On September 13, 1927, Howard Leslie Sortor married Lucy 
May Higley, the daughter of Alfred Dewey and Bessie Hart 
Higley. Lucy May was born at Hibbard, Madison County, 
Idaho, on June 19, 1909. Howard Leslie was born May 5, 1909, 
at Soda Springs, Caribou County, Idaho. 

The couple were blessed with three sons: Howard Delmer, born 
May 30, 1928, at Richvale, Teton County, Idaho; LaVerl Dean, 
born July 25, 1929, at Richvale, Teton County, Idaho; and Dale 
George, born August 28, 1930, at Richvale, Teton County, 
Idaho. 

Howard moved his family from the Teton Basin to either Sugar 
City or St. Anthony, Idaho. On September 9, 1933, Lucy May 
Higley Sortor gave birth to a tiny baby girl at St. Anthony, 
Idaho; both mother and baby died. Lucy was laid to rest in 
Sugar City, Idaho. 



Ruby M. Sortor in "The Madsen 
Family." (Trout/Piquet, 1992) 

Ruby Nada Madsen and Howard 
Leslie Sortor married August 8, 1934. 



Erma Marlene Sortor 
born May 8, 1935. 

Wanda Lou Sortor 
born November 13, 1936. 



(Ruby) "I married Howard Leslie Sortor on August 8, 1934, at 
the court house in Rexburg, Idaho. He had three little boys 
when we were married: Delmer, age 6; LaVerl, age 5; and Dale, 
age 4." 

Howard farmed in the Sugar City area for a few years and 
during this time Ruby gave birth to two little girls: Erma 
Marlene was born May 8, 1935; and Wanda Lou was born 
November 13, 1936. In about 1937, Howard and Ruby moved 
their growing family to Teton Basin where they lived at the 
Martin place and later in the home owned by Ruby's mother, 
Mary Madsen. 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Marlene) "LaVerl used to call me Calamity Jane because 
everything happened to me. 'Here comes Calamity!'' he always 
said. Maybe that's why I enjoyed books. It was safer that way." 



321 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Beverly Joyce Sortor 
born September 14, 1938. 



Howard and Ruby moved back to Sugar City and were living 
there in 1938 when their third daughter, Beverly Joyce, was 
born on September 14. 



Uncle Johnnie. 
(Sorter, LaVerl D., 2003) 



Ruby Darlene Sortor born 
and died on May 18, 1942. 

Judy Jean Sortor 
born June 14, 1945. 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005) 



Zf\*Z> 




LaVerl Dean Sortor. 



(LaVerl) "One day when I was about 10 years old, I didn't get 
my chores finished before it was time for my dad to get home. 
Uncle Johnnie warned me that as soon as Daddy got home, my 
behind would be whacked hard. I was scared but knew there 
was no time to finish and I knew what awaited me. Uncle 
Johnnie went to his truck and called me over. He pulled a 
couple of magazines out and put them in my overalls, nicely 
padding my behind. Just then, Daddy drove up in his pickup. 
Daddy got out, called me over to him, and proceeded to use his 
belt across my behind. After about three whacks, I yelped 
appropriately and ran to the house. Just before Daddy and 
Uncle Johnnie were out of sight, I looked back and caught them 
winking at each other." 

On May 18, 1942, Ruby gave birth to a baby girl who died at 
birth. They named her Ruby Darlene. She was laid to rest in 
Sugar City, Idaho. LaVerl turned 13 years old in July 1942. 

LaVerl attended schools in Sugar City, Tetonia, Idaho Falls, and 
Firth, and quit school to join the U.S. Army. 

(Wanda) "Two days before Thanksgiving 1948, our house 
burned down in the middle of the night. We lost everything 
except the new winter coats Mama had just bought for us. It 
was a very sad time for all of us. A neighbor gave us a house to 
live in until spring. When LaVerl came home at Christmas, he 
bought Mama a new dinette set and Christmas gifts for all of us. 

"In March 1949, we moved to a farm in American Falls, Idaho. 
In June 1950, LaVerl and Dale were home on furlough but were 
called back to base because of the Korean War. Both of my 
brothers were sent to Korea and both were wounded. 



322 



LaVerl Dean Sortor and JoAnn E. Marshall 



"Daddy finally gave up farming and we moved to Pocatello. He 
got a job in Alaska and spent his summers there and winters 
with us. 



U.S. joins Korean Conflict 
June 25, 1950. 



"When LaVerl returned from his tour of duty in Korea, he began 
dating JoAnn Marshall, whom he had dated while he was home 
on leave. They decided to marry and he went to Alaska to work 
with Daddy. Daddy came home for the birth of our sister, 
Sandra Lee Sortor, on July 31, 1951. 



Sandra Lee Sortor 
born July 31, 1951. 



"In June 1952, Mama went to Anchorage, Alaska, to be with 
Daddy. She took Judy and Sandra with her. JoAnn Marshall, 
LaVerl's fiance, also went with her. LaVerl was working in 
Alaska and they planned to be married once she got there. 
Mama left Marlene, Beverly, and me at home. The Anderson 
family that lived above us were to look after us. Delmer and 
Ella and Aunt Luella also agreed to look after the three of us." 



JOANN E. MARSHALL 



Life Sketch of JoAnn E. Marshall. 
(Sortor, Michael A., 1999) 



(Michael) "I am going to tell you about my grandmother, JoAnn 
E. Marshall, and how she was born on June 5, 1934, in a cabin 
on a ranch in Salina, Utah, which is located on the northern edge 
of Fishlake National Forest. 



"During my many visits with her, she told me about this cabin. 
It was built sometime in the 1800s and had one room and a great 
fireplace. It even had rifle slits in the walls, which the settlers 
used for protection. 

"The place had a merry-go-round made from an old wagon 
wheel on which the kids played. For an ice box, they went to 
the nearby lake and cut chunks of ice to put in the box to keep 
their food cold. My grandmother liked this cabin and told me 
how she would like to go and see it again. 



323 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"Grandma's parents were John and Opal Furnise Marshall. She 
was the big sister of Monty and John. Her father was a 
carpenter who crafted furniture and such, and her mother was a 
housewife." 

JoAnn attended elementary school in Alameda, Idaho, and like 
most children, she spent her summers riding bicycles, swinging, 
and swimming at the nearby canal where she and her brothers 
went to escape the hot summer sun. 

JoAnn attended high school at Pocatello High. She was a very 
good student with good academic skills and also participated in 
other extracurricular activities. While she was in high school, 
JoAnn met a young man named LaVerl Sortor, who had enlisted 
in the U.S. Army and was due to be shipped out to Korea soon. 

LAVERL DEAN SORTOR AND JOANN E. MARSHALL 



LaVerl Dean Sortor and JoAnn E. 
Marshall married June 26, 1952. 



Life Sketch of JoAnn E. Marshall. 
(Sortor, Michael A., 1999) 



Luella Colleen Sortor 
born August 23, 1953. 



On June 26, 1952, LaVerl Dean Sortor and JoAnn E. Marshall 
were married in Anchorage, Alaska. 

(Michael) "My grandmother told me how, during the summer, 
they went fishing at an enchanting place called Ship Creek and 
about the large salmon they caught. They stayed in Alaska for 
a brief time and lived quite nicely. Grandpa LaVerl worked 
construction." 

LaVerl developed medical problems and was unable to obtain 
the care he needed locally, so he and JoAnn returned to 
Pocatello, Idaho. LaVerl took a job in law enforcement and 
JoAnn began working as a waitress. 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005) 



Richard Leslie Sortor 
horn July 25, 1955. 



(Wanda) " I was engaged to Orville for a year while he was 
stationed in the Philippines. In the fall of 1955, I got a job 
working on a combine for a local farmer. Marlene, JoAnn 
(LaVerl's wife), and I worked together. We needed transpor- 
tation to and from so we pooled our resources (about $30.00, 1 
think) and bought this old, old car. It was a Chevrolet or 



324 



LaVerl Dean Sortor and JoAnn E. Marshall 



something and it had no lights. We had no problem getting out 
there in the morning but we often worked until after dark and it 
was really hard to get home with no lights. We stayed on the 
back roads so we wouldn't get picked up." 

On April 1, 1959, LaVerl and JoAnn moved to Reno, Nevada. 
Here LaVerl worked at a variety of jobs including moving 
furniture, working at a dairy where he eventually became a sales 
manager, selling restaurant supplies, and eventually obtaining 
a real estate license. JoAnn worked as a waitress at various 
restaurants including the Nugget. 



Stephen Sortor 
born February 11, 1964. 

Michael Sortor 
born September 7, 1966. 




JoAnn Sortor and her father-in-law, 
Howard Leslie Sortor. 



LaVerl and JoAnn settled into a pleasant life in a nice 
neighborhood in Reno. On St. Patrick's Day, they adopted the 
first of their two boys, Stephen, who was born February 11, 
1964, in Reno, Washoe County, Nevada. In 1966, they adopted 
Michael, who was born September 7, 1966, in Reno, Nevada. 

In 1972, LaVerl and JoAnn purchased an undeveloped lot near 
Winnemucca, Nevada. They worked together to develop this 
property and eventually created a home in which to live. They 
remained on their property for two years before moving back to 
Winnemucca, Nevada. JoAnn again sought work as a waitress, 
working nights, which allowed her to be at home with her sons 
during the day. The boys attended junior high and high school 
in Winnemucca. 

In later years, LaVerl worked as an EMT for an ambulance 
company and JoAnn retired from the restaurant. She had always 
dreamed of having a garden and carefully planned and planted 
flowers and trees around their home. 



Life Sketch of JoAnn E. Marshall. 
(Sortor, Michael A., 1999) 



(Michael) "I remember my grandmother watering her trees and 
flowers. When she came in, we would discuss something for the 
day; sometimes just something silly and other times the most 
serious things. 



325 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Howard Leslie Sorter 
died November 17, 1997. 

Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
died September 10, 1998. 



JoAnn E. Marshall Sortor 
died April 7, 1999. 



"Holidays were important to Grandma. She was there for us at 
Christmas, our birthdays, and Easter. She liked to hide the eggs 
and my brother and I hunted for them in her back yard." 



JoAnn was diagnosed with cancer and battled to overcome this 
disease. As her condition worsened, she was cared for by 
LaVerl, and Michael and his wife, Maeline. JoAnn passed away 
on April 7, 1999. 



Verl continues to live in Winnemucca, Nevada. He and JoAnn 
have two sons and two grandsons: 

Stephen Sortor was born February 1 1, 1964, in Reno, Washoe 
County, Nevada. 

Michael Sortor was born September 7, 1966, in Reno, Washoe 
County, Nevada. He married Maeline and they have two sons: 

Michael A. Sortor is an M.P. in the U.S. Air Force and is 
currently stationed in Turkey. 

Chase Sortor is a senior in high school. 



326 



LaVerl Dean Sortor and JoAnn E. Marshall 



\SjJUvvjl^ 




A group of Sortor brothers and cousins (above) together for a picture. Back row, L to R: Lloyd, 
Darrell, Delmer, Dale and LaVerl. Front row, L to R: Billy and Russell. Circa 1936. Courtesy 
Wanda Lou Bock. 



Pictured at right are JoAnn E. Marshall 
Sortor and her father-in-law, Howard 
Leslie Sortor. Circa 1996. Courtesy 
Wanda Lou Bock. 







327 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



32X 



Chapter 1 7 

DALE GEORGE SORTOR, 

BEVERLY ROBINSON AND 

JEAN SANDERS DIVESTI 




u 



Dale George Sortor. 



Information for this chapter provided 

by several of Dale's sisters. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Lucy May Higley 

Born: 19 Jun 1919, Hibbard, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 9 Sep 1933, St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 17 Nov 1997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Dale George Sortor 

Born: 8 Aug 1930, Richvale, Teton, Idaho 
Died: 1 2 Feb 2004, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Married: Beverly Robinson 



Born: 7 Dec 1938, 
Died: Living 



Ronald Sortor 

Born: 10 Jun 1953, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Donald Sortor 

Born: 10 Jun 1953, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Rodney (Bim) Sortor 

Born: 21 Jul 1954, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Rocky Sanders 

Born: 5 Sep 1961 , Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Renae Sortor 








Born: 


14 May 1956, 


Pocatello, 


Bannock, 


Idaho 


Died: 


Living 










Marri 

Born: 
Died: 


ed: Jean Sanders DiVesti 


Living 






Connie Sanders 

Born: 25 Sep 1956 
Died: Living 




Vic Grudzinski 

Born: 22 Aug 1957 
Died: Living 




John 

Born: 
Died: 


Sanders 

29 Nov 1958 
Living 






Debbie Chapman Sortor 

Born: 7 Dec 1959, Pocatello, 
Died: Living 


Bannock, Idaho 




Sheila Sortor 

Born: 1 Oct 1962, Pocatello, 
Died: Living 


Bannock, Idaho 




Justin 

Born: 
Died: 


Dale Sortor 

30 Aug 1966, Pocatell 
, 1986, Salt L; 


o, Bannock, Idaho 
ike City, Utah 





Dale George Sortor, Beverly Robinson, and Jean Sanders DiVesti 



DALE GEORGE SORTOR 



1930 

Obituary. 
(Idaho State Journal, 2004) 

Dale George Sortor 
born August 28, 1930. 

Howard Leslie Sortor and Ruby Nada 
Madsen married August 8, 1934. 



Dale George Sortor, born August 28, 1930, was the third son 
born to Howard Leslie and Lucy May Higley Sortor. They were 
living in Tetonia, Teton County, Idaho, at that time. Dale's 
older brothers are Howard Delmer, born May 30, 1928; and 
LaVerl Dean, born July 25, 1929. The family later moved to 
St. Anthony, Idaho, and it was here Dale's mother died 
following childbirth on September 9, 1933. He was just three 
years old. 




ju.UJ J I ! i l.-IW ll .1 ■! UIL ' .JM 



— 



„ 



On August 8, 1934, just before Dale's fourth birthday, Howard 
married Ruby Nada Madsen. She became a mother to Dale and 
his two brothers in every sense of the word. 

After Howard married Mary Madsen 's daughter, Ruby Nada, 
Mary took Dale everywhere with her. 




Dale George Sortor with his mother, 
Lucy May Higley Sortor. 

Erma Marlene Sortor 
born May 8, 1934. 

Wanda Lou Sortor 
born November 13, 1936. 

Beverly Joyce Sortor 
born September 14, 1938. 



On May 8, 1935, the first of Dale's little sisters was born. Her 
parents named her Erma Marlene. She was followed on 
November 13, 1936, by Wanda Lou, and on September 14, 
1938, by Beverly Joyce. 

Dale's grandmother, Mary Madsen, kept a diary during 1941, 
and mentioned that someone had come into her house and eaten 
some of her biscuits and donuts. A few days later she wrote that 
it was Delmer, Dale, and a friend of theirs who ate the food. 
She expressed relief that she wasn't robbed and the boys had 
found some good food to eat. For Christmas that year, she 
recorded Howard and Ruby and their six children coming for 
dinner. Dinner was at Amy's, who lived just across the street, 
and then everyone, including Uncle Johnnie and Uncle Mel, 
went to Grandma Madsen 's. She lived in a tiny house so 
conditions were certainly crowded. 



331 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Ruby Darlene Sortor 
born and died on May 18, 1942. 



On May 18, 1942, Ruby gave birth to a baby girl who died at 
birth. They named her Ruby Darlene. She was laid to rest in 
Sugar City, Idaho. Dale was nearly 12 years old at that time. 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "Grandpa Sortor made the pretty, wooden casket for 
Ruby Darlene and lined it with white satin. Later, at the 
cemetery, Dale was crying and ran back to the car so he wasn't 
included in the picture that was taken." 



Mary Madsen, Nellie Standen, 

Thelma Standen, and Sandra Standen 

drowned July 19, 1943. 



On July 19, 1943, Dale's grandmother, Mary Madsen, drowned 
in a boating accident on Island Park Reservoir. Also drowned 
were Nellie Madsen Standen, Mary's daughter, Thelma Heath 
Standen, Nellie's daughter-in-law, and Sandra Standen, 
Thelma's daughter. This was a great loss to the family. 



Judy Jean Sortor 
born June 14, 1945. 



In 1945, another little sister was added to the Sortor family. She 
was born June 14, and named Judy Jean. 



Dale lived in Tetonia, Sugar City, Firth, and Idaho Falls as he 
was growing up. During the time he attended high school, he 
lived with his Sortor grandparents. Dale was loved by three 
families: the Sortors, Higleys, and Madsens. 



U.S. joined Korean Conflict 
June 25, 1950. 



On August 28, 1947, his 17th birthday, Dale joined the U.S. 
Army. Following boot camp, he was stationed in Japan. Dale 
had served in Japan for one year when he returned home on 
leave. On July 26, 1950, he was deployed to Korea. He was 
there only two months when, on September 24, 1950, he was 
shot in the leg. He was only 20 years old. Dale was shipped to 
the hospital in Tacoma, Washington, where his injury was 
treated and his leg placed in a cast up to his hip. Howard drove 
the family to Tacoma, Washington, in his Henry 'J' to pick Dale 
up and the entire family went along. 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "In January 1951, Daddy, Mama, Marlene, Beverly, 
Judy, and I all went to Tacoma to get Dale (with his leg still in 
a cast) for a furlough. It was a crowded trip home but a very 



332 



Dale George Sortor, Beverly Robinson, and Jean Sanders DiVesti 

happy one. Later, LaVerl was sent to Korea and he was also 
wounded." 



LaVerl was home on leave with one of his friends, Wally 
Gibson, at this same time and the three young men decided to 
take Marlene and Wanda and some of their friends to the Sage 
Brush Inn in American Falls. Dale hid his crutches under the 
table and taunted others in the club. When the guys came over 
to fight, Dale pulled out his crutches and said, 'Go ahead and hit 
me if it makes you feel like a big man!'' Everyone just laughed. 
Dale was always a lot of fun. 



Sandra Lee Sortor 
born July 31, 1951. 



Too soon Dale returned to the hospital in Washington for more 
treatments, but he got homesick and returned home. Everyone 
was glad to see him; unfortunately, he was AWOL. While Dale 
was home, he got tired of his cast, so he sawed it off. Soon the 
MPs came and took him back. His leg finally healed and he 
came home again. Again he was AWOL. The MPs again 
returned him. Dale was stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas, for a 
time, and again he returned home. The MPs never had trouble 
finding Dale and he never gave them any trouble. Dale just 
grinned and explained he signed up for three years but, due to 
the cease fire in Korea, the Army extended his time to five, and 
he was tired of being there. 



c 



Korean Armistice signed 
July 27, 1953. 

Luella Colleen Sortor 
born August 23, 1953. 

Richard Leslie Sortor 
born July 25, 1955. 



On July 31, 1951, Sandra Lee Sortor joined the family. 

In 1952, Dale received an honorable discharge and was proud of 
his time in the service. He later applied for disability payments 
due to the injury to his leg. 

Ruby and Howard added two more children to their family: 
Luella Colleen was born August 23, 1953; and Richard Leslie 
was born July 25, 1955. 



333 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Howard, Dale, and George Sortor 
with twins, Donald and Ronald. 



In 1955, Dale bought a black Cadillac sedan and took two of his 
sisters, Wanda and Beverly, ages 18 and 16, on several 
memorable trips. They drove to California and Mexico on one 
excursion, and another time visited Yellowstone National Park 
and Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Dale loved his family and often 
brought gifts home for his young sisters, little brother, and 
parents. He spent hours entertaining them with his adventures. 
Dale was a lot of fun and a great host to his little sisters. 

Dale loved animals, especially horses. He had one horse in 
particular that he cherished and named Dove. The Sortor family 
had a dog named Collie who insisted on digging up the 
neighbors flowers. The neighbor finally got fed up with this 
behavior and threatened to shoot the dog. Dale took Collie to 
his home and cared for him. Dale also had a cat named Amy 
and she became his new-found animal love. 

Not all animals loved Dale, however. When Beverly was 
young, Howard gave her a goat and that animal took an instant 
dislike for Dale. The goat butted Dale every chance it got. 
Finally, Howard took pity on Dale and told him to tie the goat 
to a tree in the orchard. By luck or coincidence, the goat twisted 
the rope and eventually hanged itself. 



Dale George Sortor and 

Beverly Robinson married 

August 1952. 




Dale Sortor with his twin sons, Donald 
and Ronald, and Rodney. 



DALE GEORGE SORTOR AND BEVERLY ROBINSON 

In August 1952, Dale married Beverly Robinson. They made 
their home in the Pocatello area. Dale worked in the 
construction industry, as a mechanic, and in maintenance. He 
was a gifted mechanic and repairman. He was employed at the 
University of Utah for many years and received many letters of 
commendation and several special awards for his excellent 
employment record at the University. 

Dale did everything in a big way. He became a father for the 
first time with twin boys: Ronald and Donald, born June 10, 
1953. On July 21, 1954, Dale and Beverly added Rodney (Bim) 



J34 



Dale George Sortor, Beverly Robinson, and Jean Sanders DiVesti 

to their family. He was followed by Renae, born May 14, 1956, 
and Rocky, born September 5, 1961. Dale and Beverly were 
later divorced. 

DALE GEORGE SORTOR AND JEAN SANDERS 
DIVESTI 

On November 27, 1958, Dale married Jean Sanders DiVesti at 
Reno, Nevada, and added Jean's three children to the family: 
a daughter, Connie Sanders, born September 25, 1956; and two 
more sons: Vic Grudzinski, born August 22, 1957; and John 
Sanders, born November 29, 1958. Dale and Jean had three 
more children: Debbie Chapman born December 7, 1959; 
Sheila, born October 1, 1962; and Justin Dale, born August 30, 
1966. Dale loved all his children and was very proud of each 
one. Dale and Jean were later divorced. 

Dale was quite muscular from his years of mechanical work and 
loved to show off his muscles to his children. He would flex his 
biceps and let his kids hang on his arms to test his strength. 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Marlene) "Dale's youngest son, Justin, was only 20 years old 
when he was killed. He and some of his friends went to a party. 
Justin got into a disagreement of some sort with another young 
kid. The young man left but came back after a bit and brought 
two of his friends with him. He called Justin out into the 
parking lot, pulled a gun, and shot Justin five times, three bullets 
hitting his heart, one in his kidney, and one in his thigh. He was 
taken to the emergency room where he walked in on his own. 
He was then life-flighted to Salt Lake City but they couldn't 
save him. In the meantime, the young kid with the gun drove to 
his grandmother's house and shot himself. 

"In his later years, Dale said, 'Losing a child is something you 
never get over, you just go on. '" 



< 

c 



335 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Following his retirement, Dale settled in McCammon, Idaho, 
where he continued to enjoy his various hobbies, which included 
knife-making, hunting, fishing, gambling at the casino at Fort 
Hall, Idaho, western movies, and horses. His main interests in 
life, however, were his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. 
Dale has 26 grandchildren and 23 great-grandchildren as of this 
writing. 



Howard Leslie Sortor 
died November 17, 1997. 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
died September 10, 1998. 



One of Dale's greatest achievements was conquering the habits 
of smoking and drinking. This was very difficult for Dale and 
shows the strength of character he possessed. This same 
strength enabled him to fight the cancer with which he was 
diagnosed. As his health failed, he moved in with his daughter, 
Debbie. 

Others of his family also assisted in his care. Delmer and 
Nadine helped care for Dale, and Delmer spent a great deal of 
time with his younger brother. LaVerl was also a frequent 
visitor. All of Dale's sister's helped as well, including Beverly, 
who visited him often. On one occasion, his innate sense of 
humor showed when Beverly made him drink several glasses of 
water each day. He told her that she was not only flushing out 
his kidneys but his lungs as well. 



Dale lived life to the fullest. At one time he told his youngest 
brother, Ricky, 'I've made some mistakes in my life and have a 
few regrets, but it's been a hell of a party! ' 

He was good friends with Jean and told his sister, Judy, 'We get 
along fine now that I've got some brains. ' 

While Dale was ill, Beverly made him an afghan and brought 
him a sweat suit for Christmas. He loved both and asked to be 
dressed in the sweat suit and covered with the afghan when he 
left this world. 



336 



Dale George Sortor, Beverly Robinson, and Jean Sanders DiVesti 



Dale George Sortor 
died February 12, 2004. 



Dale told Debbie, a short time before his death, Justin would be 
the first person he wanted to see on the other side. Dale never 
joined an organized religion, but believed in God and in life 
after death. His family is certain he was helped across to the 
other side by his mother and beloved son, Justin. Dale passed 
away Thursday, February 12, 2004, at the home of his daughter, 
Debbie, with his family present. He was 73 years of age. His 
ashes are with his mother in Sugar City, Idaho. 

Dale and Beverly had the following children: 

Ronald Sortor was born June 10, 1953, and lives in Phoenix, 
Arizona. He is not married at this time. 

Donald Sortor was born June 10, 1953, and lives in Atomic 
City. 

Rodney (Bim) Sortor was born July 21, 1954, in Pocatello, 
Idaho, where he still lives. 



a 



Renae Sortor was born May 14, 1956, in Pocatello, Idaho. She 
is married to Mike Sievers. They live in Pocatello. 



Rocky Sortor was born September 5, 1961, Pocatello, Idaho. 
He married Heidi and lives in Kentucky. 

The following three children became Dale's when he married 
Jean: 

Connie Sanders was born September 25, 1956. She married 
Glen Leckband. They live in Minnesota. 

Vic Grudzinski was born August 22, 1957, and lives in Nampa. 

John Sanders was born November 29, 1958. He married Teri 
and they live in Pocatello. 



337 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



The following three children are Dale and Jean's: 

Debbie Chapman Sortor was born December 7, 1959, at 
Pocatello, Idaho. She is not married at this time. 

Sheila Sortor was born October 1, 1962, at Pocatello, Idaho. 
She married Kevin Taresh, but they were later divorced. 

Justin Sortor was born August 30, 1 966. He married Karmen 
and resided in Pocatello, Idaho. He was shot and killed when he 
was 20 years old. 



338 



Dale George Sortor, Beverly Robinson, and Jean Sanders DiVesti 



3£t)tS Certified that cPaJJr .7/^^V^ s ifa.zto-t 



Son 01 Daughter 



Born GMsiL^y.nJb^ 



was bap 



and confirmed a member 

n 



by Elder. 
Signed l .'tl - 




Certificate of papttem anb Confirmation 



Fatkai'i fimmm 







Ciif o» Town 



^^i/> 30-l3-%2l, by. 



Cd^uZJ^ 



&lsl 




&#£_ . C&t&X 



tide i or fii«M 



of the Church' of 3Te$ua Cljrisst of Hattec-oap fe>ainM,_^^U^l^Z / *££r~L> 




ishop 



Signed- 



_C!erk 



. . ...«. 






Dal 

e George Sortor was baptized (top photo) by Elder Charles 

Fullmer on July 7, 1940, at Richvale, Teton, Idaho. Dale 

was the proud father of twin sons (above left), 

Ronald and Donald Sortor. 

Dale lost one son, Justin Dale Sortor (right), when he was 
shot at age 20 during a disagreement with another young 
man at a party in Pocatello, Idaho. He was rushed to Salt 
Lake City, Utah, where he passed away. Circa 1986. All 
courtesy Wanda Lou Bock and Beverly Joyce Henson. 




JUSTIN SORTOR 

• 

Justin Dale Sorter, 20, 3920 Stockman, 
died Sunday morning at a hospital in Salt j 
Lake City. 

He was born 
Aug. 30, 1966 in 
Pocatello, to Jean 
Sanders and Dale 
Sortor. 

He was educat- 
ed in the Pocatel- 
lo schools, and 
enjoyed hunting, 
fishing and cars. 
He was employed 
by Main Auto 
Body. 

He is survived by his wife, Karmen, 
Pocatello; his parents, Jean Sanders of 
Pocatello, and Dale Sortor of Salt Lake 
City; grandparents, Mary Talbott of Po- 
catello, and Ruby and Howard Sortor, 
Chubbuck; six brothers, John Sanders, ' 
Pocatello, Vic Grudzinski, Nampa, Ron- 
ald Sortor and Rodney Sortor, both of 
Chubbuck, Donald Sortor, Blackfoot, and 
Rocky Sortor, West Germany; four sis- 
ters, Debbie Chapman and Shelia Sortor, " 
both of Pocatello, Connie Leckband, 
Rochester, Minn., and Renae Seivers, 
Chubbuck; and four nieces and four 
nephews. / t' f • ■ 

Funeral services will be in the Hender- 
son Funeral Chapel, 431 N. 15th, on 
Friday at 2 p.m. Visitation will be at the 
funeral home today and Thursday from 
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Friday from 10 
a.m. until time of services. Burial will be 
in Mountainview Cemetery. 



3 
j 



339 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Dale George Sortor joined the U.S. Army on 
August 28, 1947, at age 17 (right). He served two 
years in Korea and one year in Japan. He was 
released in 1952. 



Dale (below) worked construction most of his life. 
His main interest was his children, grand- 
children, and great grandchildren. He also loved 
animals and had a new little cat named Amy at the 
time of his death. 



IIIiHHMllllil 









V|() 



Chapter 18 
ERMA MARLENE SORTOR 

AND 
LAMONT C. ANDERSON 




...i 



Lamont C. Anderson and Erma Marlene Sortor married September 25, 1952. 
With them are Howard Delmer Sortor and Wanda Lou Sortor. 



Information for this chapter provided 

by Erma Marlene Sortor Anderson 

and Lamont C. Anderson. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Ruby Nada Madsen 

Born: 4 April 1915, Cache, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 1 Sep 1 998, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 17 Nov 1997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Erma Marlene Sortor 

Born: 8 May 1935, Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: LaMont C. Andersen 

Born: 1 2 Jul 1 93 1 , Fair View, Lincoln, Wyoming 
Died: Living 



Randy LaMont Anderson 

Born: 22 Mar 1959, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



John Anderson 

Born: 6 Jul 1968, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Erma Marlene Sortor and LaMont C. Anderson 



ERMA MARLENE SORTOR 



1935 



Erma Marlene Sortor born 
May 8, 1935. 

Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



"My parents were Howard Leslie and Ruby Nada Madsen 
Sortor, and I was born May 8, 1935, at the hospital in Rexburg, 
Madison County, Idaho. Daddy wanted to name me Erma but 
Mom liked the name Marlene. I've never been called Erma 
except by Delmer just to tease and one of my little 
granddaughters, who also likes to tease me. 



Delmer saved my live once! 

Marlene S. Anderson. 



Wanda Lou Sortor 
born November 13, 1936. 

Beverly Joyce Sortor 
born September 14, 1938. 



"Dad's first wife died leaving him with three little boys, Delmer, 
LaVerl, and Dale, who became my big brothers. Delmer has 
always been a very good big brother to me. He saved my life 
once. Wanda was just a baby so I would have been about two. 
From what I was told, I was swinging on the pump handle or 
something and fell down the well. Delmer was watching and 
ran into the house and got Daddy. He jumped in the well and 
pulled me out. 

"LaVerl used to call me Calamity Jane because everything 
happened to me. 'Here comes Calamity!' Maybe that's why I 
enjoyed books. It was safer that way." 



.5 



1941 



Marlene's grandmother, Mary Madsen, kept a diary for at least 
one year of her life. Following are some excerpts which provide 
a glimpse into Grandma Mary's life and her interaction with her 
daughters and granddaughters during 1941: 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 



(Mary) Wednesday, June 25: "Nell came over and stayed all 
night. We went to bed at 10:30 when someone walked in on us. 
It was Ruby, Marlene, and Beverly. They had been to see Luella 
and had gone to Logan." 



Wednesday, October 8: "7 sewed a coat for Wanda and a 

blouse for Marlene. " 

Sunday, October 12: "Marlene, Wanda, and myself went to 
Sunday School but there was none so we came home. " 



343 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Japan bombed Pearl Harbor 
December 7, 1941. 

U.S. declared war on Japan 
December 8, 1941. 
Massive rationing. 



Sunday, December 7, 1941: "War broke out on the Hawaiian 
Islands today. The day was just spoiled when we heard of the 



war. 



The world was at war with Germany and its allies and, 
following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the United States 
declared war on Japan. 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Marlene) "I was only six when the war started. We were living 
in Sugar City then. Everyone was so frightened. We didn't 
know if the United States would be attacked or not. We had to 
put blankets over all the windows to keep the light from shining 
out at night. I also remember the rationing. We had to go 
without a lot of things. 




Wanda Lou and 
Erma Marlene Sortor. 



Ruby Darlene Sortor 
stillborn May 18, 1942. 



Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005) 



"We moved back to Teton Basin and I attended first grade in the 
little school on the corner just across from the church. We lived 
in Grandma Madsen's house at that time. I loved first grade 
because I learned how to read, and I loved Miss Koontz. She 
was such a good teacher. 

"Just a few days after my sixth birthday, my mom gave birth to 
a baby girl at the hospital in Rexburg. She died at birth. Wanda 
and I were staying with my Uncle Bill and Aunt Mary Sortor 
and one of their girls, maybe Barbara, was pounding on the 
piano. Aunt Mary scolded her and told her to 'be quiet, there 
was a death in the house. ' It frightened me because I thought 
she might be talking about my mother, and I must have asked 
her what she was talking about because she took me into the 
bedroom to look at the baby lying in her casket. For some 
reason, when I think about that tiny casket, I get the feeling it 
was made of cardboard." 

(Wanda) "When our baby sister died, they put her tiny body in 
a cardboard box while Grandpa Sortor made a little wooden 
casket for her. He was a very accomplished carpenter. I'll 
never forget them carrying that tiny casket to her grave." 



344 



Erma Marlene Sortor and LaMont C. Anderson 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Marlene) "Sometime after this, we moved to Sugar City where 
Dad rented a farm. We lived there for about two years. Our 
house was right across the street from the little two-grade 
school. They only taught first and second grade there. 




Old tabernacle in Idaho Falls was 
remodeled in 1941-1942. 

Conversations. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004) 



"Bill and Bob Trout lived with us for a time. We loved to play 
Monopoly and Bill begged us to play. He was the middle boy 
and, inevitably, he lost his temper and the board went flying in 
the air and the pieces went everywhere. He got so mad! Then 
later he'd beg us to play again. 

"On June 5, 1943, when I was eight years old, Grandma Madsen 
took Mel, Bill, and Bob Trout, and me to the tabernacle in Idaho 
Falls where we were baptized members of The Church of Jesus 
Christ of Later-day Saints. None of our parents were there and 
I don't remember why the Trout brothers were there either. I 
was fascinated by the word 'tabernacle' and repeated it over 
and over. We were living in Sugar City, Idaho, at that time. I 
attended second grade and part of third grade in Sugar City." 

Mel Trout was 12 years old in 1943, Bill Trout was 10, and Bob 
Trout was eight. They had been living in Twin Falls, Idaho. 



Mary Madsen died 
July 19, 1943. 



(Marlene) "Wanda and I got into some trouble with Grandma 
Sortor one day. We weren't really used to being in town and, 
when we found a letter in her mailbox, we were so excited 
because we thought she had gotten mail. We pulled the letter 
out and took it to her. In the meantime, the mailman came and 
missed her letter. She was so mad at us. 



1945 



Judy Jean Sortor 
born June 14, 1945. 



"I remember my birthday when I was 10. We were living in 
Firth and Daddy took me with him to sell some sheep at the 
auction in Idaho Falls. Afterward, he took me to a jewelry shop 
and bought me a watch. I wasn't expecting it and I was stunned 
and shocked. The watch cost $40.00, and at that time, that was 
really a lot of money. I'm not sure what I did to deserve that. 
I was always so scrawny and sick and maybe that's why he did 



345 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



it. I'd been sick a lot but wasn't diagnosed with rheumatic fever 
until I was 12 or 13. I still have that watch. 




Delmer and Marlene Sortor. 
Circa 1946. 



"In Spring 1946, Aunt Luella and Uncle Wes brought their three 
boys and came to live with us. Bob and I were 10 at that time, 
Bill was 12, and Mel was 14. Wes was helping with the farming 
and Luella helped Mom with all the cooking and cleaning. Wes 
smoked and had a habit of leaving his cigarettes on the cupboard 
in the kitchen. Bob, Bill, and I decided to try smoking so we 
snuck a cigarette from the pack and scampered out to the old 
sheep camp. We lit up and each took a puff. When it was Bob's 
turn, he inhaled too much and nearly chocked to death. He had 
his head hanging out the back of the camp coughing and 
chocking. We weren't so sure he was going to live. 

"That didn't teach us anything so we tried it again. We gathered 
close to the house and planned how to snatch another of Uncle 
Mel's cigarettes but, when we walked in the house, Mel was 
sitting in the living room, just watching us. He didn't tell on us 
but that was the end of the smoking. 



"Dad farmed for a living and rented or leased the farms. We 
rarely spent more than one year on any farm. We stayed in Firth 
longer than our average and I attended the rest of third, fourth, 
and part of fifth grade there. Then we moved to Idaho Falls 
where I finished grade school." 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "Marlene got rheumatic fever when she was in seventh 
grade and had to go to the hospital for two weeks. Then she had 
to stay in bed all summer. She couldn't even get up to walk 
anywhere. Daddy carried her whenever she wanted to gt up. 
She was able to go back to school that fall. We were attending 
O.E.Bell Junior High." 



Interview. 
(Anderson. Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Marlene) "I love books and, if I could get my hands on a book, 
I could make myself happy all day long. When we moved to 
Idaho Falls, the library was just across the street from the junior 



J46 



Erma Marlene Sortor and LaMont C. Anderson 



high and I went there on my lunch hour to get new books. I 
could have all the books I wanted. 

"The only thing I did for money was pick potatoes in the fall. 
I did that even after I was married. LaVerl's wife, JoAnn, was 
my partner and Mom and Delmer's first wife, Ella, were 
partners. We always went out to the same big farm to work. 
Our goal was to pick 200 sacks before lunch break, which we 
spent sitting on the ground leaning against a sack of potatoes. 
Then we picked 100 sacks after lunch. If we did that every day, 
we could earn $350 during potato harvest. That was good 
money at that time. Hard work pulling those baskets along 
though. The potato picking days are gone and now it's a lost 
art. 



1949 



Sandra Lee Sortor 
born July 31, 1951. 



"After Delmer and Ella were married, they lived just down the 
road from us not too far from Fielding Memorial Cemetery. 
They had an old car and I wanted to drive. Even though I was 
only about 13, Ella agreed to let me try. I had driven tractors 
before but it's not the same. I had to back out of the driveway 
and then turn quickly because there was a really big, deep canal 
on the other side of the road. When I backed out, my foot 
missed the brake and hit the gas. That car sped backwards right 
into the canal and ended up nearly perpendicular. 



"We weren't hurt but we were scared to death and badly shaken. 
Irrigation season was over and, luckily, there wasn't much water 
in the canal or we might have drowned. We were afraid to tell 
Delmer so Ella said she would tell him she was driving and just 
got dizzy somehow and backed into the canal. It was a long 
time before he found out it was really me. That was my first and 
last driving experience for a long time." 



Letter to Merry F. Shaw. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2003) 



(Marlene) "All the pictures Mom had were destroyed when our 
home burned to the ground when I was 13 years old. It was just 
two days before Thanksgiving in 1948. We lost everything. 
The next spring we moved to American Falls, Idaho." 



347 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Marlene) "We lived in American Falls for a short time and, 
when we moved from there to Pocatello, we lived in a basement 
apartment. I never attended school after we left American Falls. 
I was 15 and I think we had moved 11 or 12 times by then. 
Many of those moves were to new towns and new schools. It 
was really hard to keep friends moving as often as we did. 
While we lived in Idaho Falls, Wanda and I had a good friend 
named Ardith. Wanda saw her a few times after we grew up but 
I didn't. 



"My brother, Delmer, worked at FMC and he and his wife were 
good friends with Bud's sister, Alice Donetta. Bud had just 
gotten out of the Army and hadn't been home very long. One 
night they introduced Bud and me and took us to a movie. I was 
only 16 and Bud was 21. That was in February 1952, and we 
were married in September. I turned 17 on May 8 that year." 

LAMONT C. (BUD) ANDERSON 



LaMont C. Anderson born 
July 12, 1931. 

Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Bud) "My parents were Orlando and Annetta Frandsen 
Anderson. My dad was born May 15, 1904, in Chesterfield, 
Bannock County, Idaho, and Mother was born February 5, 1910, 
in Paradise, Cache County, Utah. Her parents were Nephi and 
Margaret Kay Willes Frandsen. My father's parents were Alice 
Elinora Tolman and Hans Peter Anderson. The Tolman family 
went broke because they owned so much land around 
Chesterfield and that's when my grandparents moved to Afton, 
in Star Valley, Wyoming. Dad followed and that's where all us 
kids were born. I was born July 12, 1931, at Fair View, Lincoln 
County, Wyoming." 

(Marlene) "Annetta was a tiny little thing. I always thought she 
was so cute." 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Bud) "In the early 1990s, my brothers and sisters and I learned 
we had an older sister we'd never heard of. It's a really 
heartbreaking story. In 1925, when my mother was 15, she 



J48 



Erma Marlene Sortor and LaMont C. Anderson 



started dating some guy and must have really liked him. He 
told her he was going to marry her and took her to Shoshone, 
Idaho. But Mother got pregnant and he abandoned her. She 
found a doctor in Shoshone and stayed there until her baby girl 
was born. The doctor arranged an adoption and a family named 
Johnson took the baby and named her Dorothy Jean. Annetta 
came back to Pocatello but those who found out about her 
pregnancy treated her terribly. In those days, it was always on 
the girl and the boy just walked away. 

"On October 1, 1927, Annetta married my dad, but she never 
told him about the baby she'd given up two years before. 

"Jean knew who her birth mother was and, when she turned 18, 
she contacted Annetta and begged to please let her come and be 
part of the family. But Annetta had never told Orlando about 
this little girl, she already had six children, and was afraid it 
would break up her marriage. 

"Years later, Jean decided to contact her family again. She 
obtained the phone number for one of my brothers and called. 
She asked if he was sitting down and then proceeded to tell him 
she was his sister and lived in New Mexico. She said she had 
proof, and sent letters written to her by our mother. They are 
heart wrenching and tell about the way people treated her 
because they knew she had a baby out of wedlock. Jean also 
had her birth certificate and adoption papers. We invited her to 
visit and as soon as she walked in the yard, we knew who she 
was. She looks just like our mother. Neither of my two other 
sisters look like her at all. 

"Jean had a completely different life from the rest of Annetta's 
children. Annetta took that to her grave. Her heart must have 
broken when she turned that girl away and she never did tell our 
dad. She probably lived in fear that Jean would one day return. 
In our hearts we feel like Mother knows Jean is reunited with us 
and is very happy. 



349 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"We grew up in Star Valley and there wasn't much in the way 
of stores in Thayne and no mall to hang out in and still isn't. At 
night, we used to build a big bonfire out in the pasture and all 
the kids gathered there and played games like run sheep run, fox 
and geese, and many others. There is a real advantage in living 
in a less populated area. 

"We lived close to my grandparents and I got in a little trouble 
with my grandpa once in awhile. I like cantaloupe and, in those 
days, we bought it by the case and stored it in the barn where it 
was cool most of the time. A hay knife and cantaloupe work 
pretty well together. Granddad didn't think too much of that. 
My grandpa never whipped me but my dad believed in corporal 
punishment. 

"One Sunday, my oldest brother and I hooked the team of horses 
up to the sleigh and took it to town. We were cutting shiners in 
the street. The sleigh box came off the runners and the team 
took off and ran into a barbed wire fence. The wire cut the 
shoulder of one horse wide open. Granddad wasn't too happy 
about that either. 

"One of my most frightening experiences was when I was 
raking hay and the neck yoke broke on the rake letting the 
tongue come down, which broke the tongue. The horses took 
off running and went through a ditch and the rake went up in the 
air. I came down on the double tree. I was really lucky I wasn't 
thrown into the teeth where I'd have been baled up with the hay. 

"I had plenty of work that should have kept me out of trouble. 
We milked cows and put up hay. When I was 17, I got my 
Social Security card and went to work for the new cheese 
factory there in Thayne. Star Valley is noted for it's Swiss 
cheese factories. At that time, you didn't need a Social Security 
card until you started work. Now you have to get one as soon 
as you're born. 



350 



Erma Marlene Sortor and LaMont C. Anderson 



"I didn't graduate from high school, which wasn't that 
uncommon at that time. Later I attended trade school and 
several other training schools. 



U.S. involved in 
Korean Conflict, June 25, 1950. 




Beverly, Wanda, JoAnn, and Marlene. 

They were having a fun day and posed 

with an empty beer bottle they found. 



"While I was in the Army, I was at Fort Carson, Colorado; and 
Fort Campbell, and Fort Knox, Kentucky. I joined the Army 
before the United States got involved in the Korean Conflict. 
Our unit got ready to ship out but anyone who had less than six 
months active duty left didn't have to go, and that included me.. 

"In 1951, while I was in the service, my parents moved to 
Pocatello where Dad got a job with Caterpillar. He later worked 
at Deseret Industries for a couple of years. My mother died in 
1968, from complications of diabetes. She was 58. Six weeks 
later, Dad died in his sleep one night. Dad was almost blind 
from diabetes. All my siblings have diabetes but I didn't get it. 
I guess Marlene got it for me. 

"I got out of the service in January 1952, and came home to 
Pocatello. That's when I was introduced to Marlene by Delmer 
and my sister, Alice Donetta Anderson. 



ERMA MARLENE SORTOR AND LAMONT C. (BUD) 
ANDERSON 



Conversations. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004) 



(Marlene) "My life really started when Bud and I were married. 
At least that's how I've always felt about it. My wedding was 
a very small event. It was held September 25, 1952, in the 
basement apartment where my parents lived in Pocatello, 
Idaho." 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Bud) "I worked for the Pocatello Police Department for nine 
and a half years. I was a motorcycle patrolman and we'd just 
been issued new crash helmets two or three weeks earlier. 
There are two sides to Pocatello: east side and west side. This 
young couple had just gotten married on the east side and their 
friends were honking and following headed west. They were 



"Bud is my very best friend 



351 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



and always has been." 

Marlene Anderson 

Luella Colleen Sortor 
born August 23, 1953. 



still on the east side when they stopped at a light and I pulled up 
alongside and was talking to them. They were in the right lane 
and I was in the turn lane. Suddenly a car came around the 
corner too fast and hit me head on. It took me back 20 or 30 
feet. Without that helmet, I could have been hurt a lot worse 
than I was. That was one of my most frightening experiences. 



Ricky Leslie Sortor 
born July 25, 1955. 



(Marlene) "After Bud and I were married, I wanted a baby so 
badly and a baby didn't come. I used to kneel by the bed and 
plead with Heavenly Father. I said I would go through anything 
to have a baby. I finally went to a doctor and he said there was 
nothing wrong with me in that respect, but in his opinion, based 
on the condition of my heart, he advised me not to have 
children. Two months later I was back to his office pregnant 
with Randy. 



Randy LaMont Anderson 
born March 22, 1959. 



"The pregnancy went pretty well, but the delivery was really 
bad. They told Bud they were afraid they wouldn't save me or 
the baby. Toward the end of the delivery there were three 
doctors attending: a cardiologist and two obstetricians. I didn't 
see Randy until sometime the next day because they took me 
right from delivery to surgery where they spent three hours 
working on me. Then they poured blood into me for two days 
straight. The whole ordeal really damaged my heart. 



"By the time Randy was 10 months old, the doctors in Pocatello 
didn't know what to do for me and referred me to the closest 
heart specialists. That meant a trip to Washington D.C. for Bud 
and me. I underwent all kinds of tests and they told me to come 
back in two years. 



I960 



"When Randy was about 18 months old, we were sealed in the 
Idaho Falls temple. That was on October 17, 1960. Mom and 
Dad hadn't been to the temple yet so they couldn't go with us, 
but Aunt Lavina was there. I was so surprised when she came 
in. She waved to me and then spent the whole time by my side 
helping me. 



352 



Erma Marlene Sortor and LaMont C. Anderson 



John Anderson born 
July 6, 1968. 



"By the early 1960s, artificial valve replacement surgeries were 
being performed in Salt Lake City, and my doctors gave me the 
choice of Salt Lake or Washington D.C. Of course, we chose 
Salt Lake. I left Randy with my mom, and Bud and I went to 
Salt Lake where I had a valve put in my heart. 

"My most terrifying experience was when I took Randy to 
Mom's house and walked out headed for that first surgery. I can 
still feel how I felt then and I don't like to think about it. 

"My heart started on it's own after that surgery. I felt somewhat 
better and it kept me going, but I also had to take blood thinners 
and other medications. I felt like I was tied to the doctor's 
office. And of course, the longer you take any medication, the 
more difficult it is to regulate how much you need. 

"My sister-in-law, Ella Burwell Sortor, died just before I got 
home from the hospital and Aunt Anna came to stay for two or 
three days. She was still there when I got home and she never 
sat down the whole time she was there. She did laundry, 
ironing, cooking, and whatever else she could find. She kept so 
busy. It was chaos but she worked through it. 

"I knew I could never have more children, so we adopted John 
when he was three days old. 

"In 1967, we bought a house on a one-acre lot in Pocatello, and 
it was here we raised our two boys. We loved the big yard; it 
was all planted in lawn and trees. The bad part was, even with 
a ride-on lawnmower, it took four hours to mow the lawn. 

"We flood-irrigated from the ditch and our water turn was at 
8:00 a.m. on Sunday mornings. We had to be there to make sure 
we got our water turn or someone else would just take the turn 
and our grass would burn. Once we turned the water on the 
grass, we had to stay there to watch it or risk flooding someone 
out. Whenever we wanted to be gone on Sunday, we had to get 



353 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



someone to take care of watering for us. Usually, my brother, 
Delmer, came to our rescue. 




John Anderson at age 14. 



"I had an empty space near my house so Wanda and I decided 
we would raise lots of tomatoes. We went to town together and 
bought dozens and dozens of tomato plants, got the ground 
ready, and planted our tomatoes. Wanda came out every other 
day to help me water and to lovingly care for our crop. Oh, we 
didn't have visions of sugar plums dancing in our heads, we had 
visions of shelf after shelf of tomatoes, salsa, and green tomato 
relish in sparkling jars. 

"As the summer wore on, it became quite apparent there was 
something wrong with our tomatoes. Especially since I lived 
near Delmer and he and Nadine always had the loveliest garden. 
Ours sure didn't look at all like theirs. 

"The truth finally dawned on us. It wasn't a total loss, however. 
Every morning I could look out my kitchen window and see row 
after row after row of the brightest yellow marigolds anyone 
ever saw. 



"Bud drove tanker truck for Chevron USA for more than 35 
years. In the late 1980s or early 1990s, Chevron moved the 
company to Oregon. At Christmas that year, they just dropped 
the bomb on us. If we wanted to work, we had to follow the 
company. We decided not to make a permanent move and 
bought a camper trailer in which to live. Bud got six weeks off 
each year, so we split that up and came back to Pocatello to take 
care of our home. 

"When Uncle Mel Larsen died (we always called him Uncle), 
Aunt Amy was visiting her son, Terry, in Portland, Oregon, so 
she and I decided to take the train to Pocatello so we could 
attend the funeral. We got on the train at 10:00 a.m. and didn't 
get into Pocatello until 3:00 a.m. We sat right across the isle 
from two young men who smoked up a storm. They were very 
nice to us and, whenever they went to the next car, they brought 



354 



Erma Marlene Sortor and LaMont C. Anderson 



Howard Leslie Sortor 
died November 17, 1997. 



us back cokes and stuff; but we nearly choked on the smoke. 
When we got off the train in Pocatello, our luggage didn't get 
off with us. I wanted to fall through the floor. All my 
medications were packed in those suitcases and I needed that 
medication. And Aunt Amy had all her clothes and stuff in her 
luggage as well. One of the women who worked for the railroad 
said she would find our luggage, so we drove to our place in 
Chubbuck and waited. She chased that train all the way to 
McCammon before she caught up with it but she brought our 
luggage to us. She didn't get back until 6:00 a.m. Overall, it 
was a fun experience but I'd never do it again. 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
died September 10, 1998. 



"By 1998, my condition was getting worse and we knew we had 
to do something. I had managed with that valve for 34 years 
and all the doctors were afraid to operate since they'd never left 
a valve in that long before. I finally found a doctor who agreed 
to do the surgery. The night before my surgery, they came into 
my room and asked me why I didn't tell them I had diabetes. I 
argued that I was sure I didn't, but they insisted. I manage it 
very well with diet and pills. Following that surgery, my heart 
didn't start on it's own and the doctors worked to get it going 
again. And now I don't have to take blood thinners! I feel like 
a new person. The doctors wanted to keep the old valve because 
it's somewhat of an antique, but I paid for that thing for 34 
years, so I kept it. 



"After our two youngest grandsons were born, Bud and I 
decided to move to Auburn to be closer and help with our 
grandchildren. Once we got settled, we swore we'd never move 
again." 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Bud) "When I was young, I lived in Auburn, Wyoming, just a 
few miles from Afton, then we moved to Thayne, which is close 
to Auburn. And now I live in Auburn again, but in California. 
I've come full circle." 



355 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Interview. 
(Anderson. Marlene and Bud, 2004) 




Bud and Marlene in Hawaii in 2004. 



(Marlene) "We spend a lot of our time at baseball games. All 
four of the grandsons play baseball and when we're not at their 
games, we're in Oakland to see the A's play. We love it. We 
take blankets and bundle up and yell till we're hoarse. And the 
girls are big fans, too. Twice a year they have fireworks after 
the game. Everyone moves out on the grass, spreads out a 
blanket, and lays down to watch. The display lasts about 
45 minutes and is really a lot of fun. 

"One of my favorite music performers is Neil Diamond. 

"In 2004, Bud and I went to Hawaii with Randy and our 17 
year-old grandson, Trenton. I was really nervous about the 
plane ride (it's nearly a five hour flight and I'm not a seasoned 
traveler), but it was fine. Our granddaughter, Brooklyn, was a 
student at BYU-Hawaii and we were going to bring her home 
with us. We rented two cars in Honolulu so we could split up 
and do what we wanted. Randy and Trenton went surfing and 
I wasn't about to do that. Bud and I toured Pearl Harbor and the 
Polynesian Center, which was wonderful. We also visited a 
huge flea market our granddaughter wanted to see. We stayed 
out at Laie, which is an hour out of Honolulu. There was only 
one hotel out there but it only cost us $88.00 per night. 



"We also visited the Dole pineapple place. We ate so much 
pineapple! We even had pineapple desert in shells at one place. 
It was so delicious." 



Conversations. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2004-2005) 



(Marlene) "I am so looking forward to being 70. I love my age; 
every year of it. My hair has gone from brown to white. My 
eyes are green like my mom's, and I am 5 feet, five inches tall. 
I've always been so thin but I've gained a little weight and 
that's good. My grandkids call me Grandma or Granny. 



_W) 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



Erma Marlene Sortor and LaMont C. Anderson 



"My youngest two grandsons spend a lot of time at our home 
and we have sort of a tradition. I have a clock with chimes and 
when the chimes sound on the hour, we have hug time. It 
doesn't matter what I'm doing, I have to drop it and run give 
those boys hugs. I love it!" 



Interview. 
(Anderson, Marlene and Bud, 2004) 



(Bud) "I have blue eyes and brown hair and a mustache. My 
hair is mostly gray now and thick just like it was when I was 
younger. I am 5 feet, 1 1 inches tall. The grandkids call me 
Grandpa, Pops, or Gramps." 

(Marlene) "Bud had a mustache when we first met but he 
shaved it off. A few years later he let it grow back and still has 
it. Right after Randy and Tami were married, Randy let his 
beard grow and a mustache as well. I didn't like it and harped 
at him for months to shave it off. One day Randy and Tami 
came over and they kept looking at each other, just holding back 
giggles. I couldn't figure out what was going on. 

Finally, Randy said, 7 guess I have to say it. Don 't you notice 
anything different?' I said, 'No. ' 'I shaved off the beard and 
mustache! ' he said. I hadn't even noticed! And after I'd made 
such a fuss about it." 



My Sister, Sandra. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2005) 



(Marlene) "When we were in Pocatello this summer, I had to 
pinch myself to be sure I wasn't the Queen at Buckingham 
Palace. We stayed with Stephanie and Travis (Sandra's 
daughter and son-in-law) and every night my bath was drawn, 
candles were lit providing a soft glow, a cassette player 
provided quiet music, and a thick terry bathrobe was waiting for 
me. Each night Stephanie provided a different fragrance of 
bubble bath for me. I really had the royal treatment. 



"One Saturday, Bud and his brother went to Star Valley to a 
rodeo and I went to Idaho Falls with Sandra, Stephanie, John 
Michael, Colleen, and Emily. We had such a good time 
shopping. Later we met Judy and her grandson, Morgan, at a 
restaurant where we talked, laughed, at ate. It was all fun until 



357 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



about 1:00 a.m. when we got back to Pocatello and hit 
Wal*Mart for more shopping. I was beginning to wonder if this 
wasn't the shopping trip from H-E-double toothpicks. My back 
was killing me. Stephanie bought some Icy Hot and rubbed my 
back while we stood in the parking lot. When we got back to 
Soda Springs at 4:00 a.m., I was feeling somewhat better. And 
yes, my bath was prepared with all the same care even though 
it was nearly dawn. I slept until after noon that day." 

"Randy has green eyes like mine, but Tami's are brown. 
Interestingly, Randy's first two children have brown eyes, the 
next two have blue eyes, next one has brown, and the youngest 
has blue eyes." 




Tayler Anderson was born 
December 2, 2003. 



LaMont Randy Anderson graduated from Highland High 
School in 1977. Randy served a mission in the Fort Lauderdale- 
Miami Florida Mission in 1978-1980. He married Tami J. 
Turner on February 14, 1981. Tami was born September 11, 
1962, in the Bay area. They have five children: Dallas, born 
June 5, 1983; Brooklyn, born November 16, 1985; Trenton, born 
August 7, 1987; Lacey, October 3, 1989; Dayton, born 
November 22, 1996; and Tracy, born November 30, 1998. 

Randy has worked for the Modesto Fire Department for many 
years. He and his wife moved to Auburn, California, to provide 
a better environment in which to raise their children, but Randy 
continues to commute to Modesto. In 2003, he was promoted 
to Captain and was involved in fighting the terrible wildfires in 
Southern California. On October 27, 2004, Randy was awarded 
the fire department's Silver Cross for heroism. 

John Anderson married Lorri Fletcher. They had no children 
and were later divorced. John lives in Caldwell, Idaho, and has 
one daughter, Tayler, born December 2, 2003. John has big 
brown eyes as does his daughter. 



358 



Erma Marlene Sortor and LaMont C. Anderson 



John is a talented artist and his work is much in demand in 
Caldwell and Parma, Idaho, and as far south as Elko, Nevada. 
He does Old West drawings and makes his own greeting cards. 
He also does wall murals and other special order paintings. 




Marlene Sortor Anderson (far left) with her aunt, Amy Child (center), and mom, Ruby Madsen Sortor 
(right). Circa 1980. Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 



359 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 





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Randy Anderson was awarded the Modesto Fire Department's Silver Cross for heroism at a banquet 
in Modesto. Pictured following the presentation are Randy, his parents, and family: back row, L to 
R: Tami, Brooklyn, Trenton, Marlene, Randy, Bud, and Dallas. Front row, L to R: Lacey, Tracy, 
and Dayton. Circa 2003. Courtesy Marlene Anderson. 



360 



Chapter 19 
WANDA LOU SORTOR 

AND 
ORVILLE RAYMOND BOCK 




Wanda Lou Sortor at age 17, and 
Orville Raymond Bock in 
his Marine Uniform. 
Circa 1956. 



Information for this chapter provided by 

Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Ruby Nada Madsen 

Born: 4 April 1915, Cache, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 10 Sep 1998, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 1 7 Nov 1 997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Wanda Lou Sortor 

Born: 13 Nov 1936, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Orville Raymond Bock 

Born: 6 Mar 1 935, Anaconda^ Deer Lodge, Montana 
Died: Living 



Vickie Lou Bock 

Born: 23 Jan 1958, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Barbara Jean Bock 

Born: 10 Jul 1959, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Sheri Jo Bock 

Born: 30 Sep 1961, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Died: Living 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 



WANDA LOU SORTOR 



1936 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 

Wanda Lou Sortor 
born November 13, 1936. 

Beverly Joyce Sortor 
born September 14, 1938. 




Wanda Lou Sortor in about 1939. 



Johnnie William Madsen. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Wanda) "I was born on November 13, 1936, at the hospital in 
Idaho Falls, Bonneville County, Idaho. I was the second child 
born to my parents, Howard Leslie and Ruby Nada Madsen 
Sortor. I have three older brothers, Delmer, LaVerl, and Dale. 
My older sister, Marlene, was born on May 8, 1935. My family 
was living in Rexburg, Idaho, at the time of my birth. 

"The next child born in our family was Beverly Joyce, who was 
born on September 14, 1938, at Sugar Salem, Idaho. 

"We later moved to the Tetonia area where we lived on what 
was called the Martin place, and at Cache in the house 
belonging to our Grandma Madsen. That was the home where 
my mom was born. I remember one Christmas while we lived 
there, Santa brought me a little washing machine made of red 
metal and clear glass. It had a red agitator in it and the little 
wringer worked by turning a hand crank. Daddy helped me do 
my first laundry, which consisted of little bits of cloth. 

"I also remember sitting on Daddy's lap one night after supper 
and I stuck a bean in his ear. With my tiny fingers, the bean 
went in quite far and Daddy had to go to the doctor to have the 
bean removed." 

(Judy) "Uncle Johnnie was good friends with Dad and Mel 
Larson (whom we called Uncle Mel). These three men 
frequently worked together teaming horses, harvesting crops, 
calving, and conducting funerals. When Wanda Lou was about 
four years old, Daddy gave her a baby chick that she loved with 
her entire little heart. To keep the baby chick warm, Mom put 
it in a box on the oven door. Wanda Lou sat by the oven door 
day after day watching her baby chick get bigger and stronger. 
One sunny day something outside distracted Wanda Lou. No 



363 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



"My parents and both uncles told and 

retold this story over the years with 

great relish and much laugher." 

Judy Jean Sortor Gillies 



sooner had she left her seat by the oven, than her older sister, 
Marlene, came by and closed the oven door. Mom discovered 
the mishap too late to save the little chick. Wanda Lou was 
inconsolable. Daddy promised three more chicks to take it's 
place. This was not good enough for Wanda Lou and nothing 
was going to get her to stop crying. Finally, he persuaded her to 
have a funeral for the chick. Daddy drove Wanda Lou in his 
truck to get Uncle Johnnie and Uncle Mel for the solemn event. 
Back home, Mom and Marlene prepared a matchbox as a final 
resting place for the little chick. Uncle Johnnie carved a cross 
with the words 'Chickie Lou Sortor' to mark the grave. Uncle 
Mel was asked to say a few words, which were, 'Dear Lord, 
bless this @#**# #@#% chicken. Now let's cut hay.' The 
children all thought the laughter emanating from the adults was 
hysteria over the loss of Chickie Lou." 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "It's really nice to remember the love of a father and 
uncles to help a little girl deal with the loss of a pet." 



U.S. at war with Germany 
in 1940. 



"I have a few memories of visiting Grandma Madsen at her little 
log house in Idaho Falls. When we went there, she made us 
Mormon tea, which was hot water with a little milk and sugar. 
Her kitchen was so small and I would ask, 'Grandma, where can 
I sit?' She would say, 'Sit on your thumb. ' I wondered how 
anyone could sit on their thumb. She made hot chocolate or 
something for her and Mama. 



Wanda's grandmother, Mary Madsen, kept a diary for at least 
one year, 1941, in which she recorded some of the incidents 
from her daily life. Below are a few in which Wanda is 
mentioned. 



Personal Diary. 
(Madsen. Mary H., 1941) 



(Mary) Tuesday, October 7: "/ sewed four slips for Wanda and 
Beverly, and cut out Wanda a coat. Ruby and I went to Ralph 
Moffett 'sfor a surprise party. Sure had a good time. Johnnie 
and Ruby sang some songs. Came home at 1:00." 



364 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 



Japan bombed Pearl Harbor 
December 7, 1941. 



Wednesday, October 8: "/ sewed a coat for Wanda and a 
blouse for Marlene. Wanda doesn 'tfeel very good. She has a 
pain in her stomach." 



Thursday, October 9: "I sewed Wanda a dress and cut out 
two aprons for Ruby and me." 



Conversation. 
(Campbell, Phil, 2003) 



(Phil) "When Howard and Ruby lived in the Basin, Wanda and 
I became very good friends and continued our friendship by 
becoming pen pals. We often visited when they returned to the 
Basin for a visit. Howard drove a Henry 'J' at that time." 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



Ruby Darlene Sortor 
born and died on May 18, 1942. 




Wanda Lou Sortor at the grave site 
for her baby sister, Ruby Darlene. 



(Wanda) "When I was five years old, Mama went to Rigby to 
have a baby. Ruby Darlene was born May 1 8, 1942, and died 
at birth. At first Marlene and I were at Aunt Stella's. Ilene and 
Geneal were so nice to us. I always loved them. We spent a lot 
of time at Aunt Stella's while we lived in Tetonia. Later, Daddy 
came to get us and took us to Aunt Mary Sortor's house in 
Sugar City. Aunt Mary took Marlene, Beverly, and me to the 
bedroom where there was a cardboard box with a blanket 
covering it. She moved the blanket and said to look at our baby 
sister who was dead. To me, Ruby Darlene looked like a big 
doll. 

"The day we buried Ruby Darlene, Aunt Mary made all the kids 
go outside. I remember being on the front porch looking 
through the screen door and watching Mama's sisters and 
Grandma Madsen washing the baby and getting her ready for 
her little casket. Grandpa Sortor made the pretty, wooden casket 
and lined it with white satin. Later at the cemetery, Dale was 
crying and ran back to the car so he wasn't included in the 
picture that was taken. 



"Sometime after that, we moved to Sugar City. I started school 
that fall at the school house across the street from our house. 
My birthday was too late and I didn't qualify to begin school 
that fall, but somehow Mama got them to let me start. My 



365 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



teacher was Mrs. Peterson. I loved school and the friends I had. 
My best friend was a Japanese girl named Alice Nakagawa. 

"I came down with measles that winter. I remember being very 
sick and how I hated those big red blotches; I wouldn't look at 
them. Mama put gloves on my hands so I could feed myself. 
When she bathed me, I kept my eyes shut very tight so I didn't 
have to see the blotches. I also got mumps that year." 



Mary Madsen, Nellie Standen, 

Thelma Standen, and Sandra Standen 

drowned July 19, 1943. 



On July 19, 1943, Wanda's grandmother, Mary Madsen, Aunt 
Nell Madsen Standen, Thelma Heath Standen, and Sandra 
Standen were all drowned in a boating accident in Island Park. 
The only ones to survive were George Standen and Bill Standen. 



Telephone Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2003) 



(Wanda) "Mom was home ironing when Dad came home to tell 
her about Grandma Madsen and Aunt Nell. She was so in 
shock, she just kept ironing and repeating, ' And Nell, too. And 
Nell, too.'' It was a horrible experience for Mama." 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "When I was in second grade, Marlene and Beverly 
both came down with whooping cough. I didn't get it but I still 
couldn't go to school. It seems like we had a big red quarantine 
sign tacked to our house a lot. Marlene also got lockjaw that 
year. I remember how terribly sick she was." 



"In Spring 1944, we moved to a farm outside Firth. We 
attended school in a one-room building called the Lower Presto 
country school with grades one through eight all in the same 
room. The school was about a mile away and we walked to and 
from school. When I was in fourth grade, we went to Upper 
Presto school. This school had two rooms and the eight grades 
were divided between them. It was farther away so we rode an 
old bus until it broke down, then Mr. Just took kids to school in 
the back of his pickup truck. 

"Then in fifth grade, we returned to Lower Presto school. 
School was always a lot of fun, especially at Christmas. The 
teacher, Mrs. Brewington, had us put on Christmas plays. At 



*66 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 



Thanksgiving she pushed all the desks together to make room 
for a stage and we began practicing our parts. When we weren't 
on stage, we were busy making red and green paper chains to 
decorate the classroom. The year that Marlene was in sixth 
grade, I was in fifth, and Beverly was in third, Marlene played 
the part of Mary, and Beverly and I were angels in the first play. 
In the second play, we were dolls." 

On January 5, 1945, Wanda was baptized a member of The 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S„ 2005b) 

Judy Jean Sortor 
born June 14, 1945. 



(Wanda) "On June 14, 1945, Judy Jean was born and I was so 
thrilled to have a baby sister that I refused to go outside to play. 
I wanted to stay in and take care of Judy. When she was six 
months old, she got pneumonia and had to go to the hospital. 
We were so happy when she got better and came home. 



"During the summer of 1946, Aunt Luella and Uncle Wes and 
their three boys came to live with us. Uncle Wes was working 
for Daddy. We had a lot of fun with Bobby and Bill, except 
when we played Monopoly. If any one of us dared to buy Park 
Place or Broadway, Bill would throw a fit and throw the game 
board and everything with it all over the kitchen. The rest of us 
wound up cleaning up the mess. You'd think we'd refuse to 
play with him again, but he begged and promised and we gave 
in only to have the same mess to clean up again. I hate that 
game to this day. 

"In 1947, we moved to Idaho Falls, Idaho. I went to Hawthorn 
Elementary for the remainder of fifth and all of the sixth grade. 

"One day Beverly and I decided to make a swing by tying a rope 
between two columns on our porch. I sat on the rope first and 
Beverly took hold of my feet to pull me out so I would swing 
back and forth. Well, I didn't swing. The rope slipped and my 
knees caught the rough edge of the porch. I was scraped and 
bruised and bleeding. My legs stiffened and I couldn't 



367 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



straighten them. I missed a week of school and still had trouble 
walking for a long time after that. 




Marlene and Wanda. 
Circa 1950s. 



"Marlene got rheumatic fever when she was in seventh grade 
and had to go to the hospital for two weeks. Then she had to 
stay in bed all summer. She couldn't even get up to walk 
anywhere. Daddy carried her whenever she wanted to get up. 
She was able to go back to school that fall and we attended O.E. 
Bell Junior High. 

"Marlene and I were in band at school. Marlene played drums 
and I played trumpet. I really hated playing trumpet and didn't 
want to be in the band, but Daddy wanted me to since Marlene 
was in it. The only thing I liked about it was going to the music 
festivals and going to Blackfoot to march in the parade for the 
Eastern Idaho State Fair in the fall. 



"Marlene and I also went to Mutual together and really loved 
going there every week. 

"Delmer, LaVerl, and Dale were all in the military. Delmer was 
in the Marines and LaVerl and Dale were in the Army. When 
Delmer came home, he married Ella Marie Burwell. Ella was 
like a big sister to us. We loved her a lot and she was so much 
fun. They lived in a little house about a half mile away on our 
farm. 

"Two days before Thanksgiving 1948, our house burned down. 
The fire started in the middle of the night. Daddy had just 
gotten home from work and he got us all out, but he kept 
coming back to the car to make sure we were all there. When 
the fire truck got there, the wires to the pump were burned so 
they couldn't get any water. We lost everything except the new 
winter coats Mama had just bought for us. It was a very sad 
time for all of us. 



.*6X 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 



"We stayed with Aunt Amy for a few days and then went to 
Grandma Sortor's. A neighbor lady named Mrs. Hatch took 
Marlene, Beverly, and me to town and bought us some new 
clothes. Another neighbor gave us a house to live in until 
spring. When LaVerl came home at Christmas, he bought 
Mama a new dinette set and Christmas gifts for all of us. 

"In March 1949, we moved to a farm in American Falls, Idaho. 
Delmer and Ella moved with us and lived in a little house next 
to ours. I finished eighth grade there and then went to the ninth 
grade at the American Falls High School. High school there 
was so much fun. Marlene and her best friend, Bonnie 
McManus, my best friends, Myrna Morris and Sharon Viken, 
and I chased around together. On weekends Marlene and I went 
horseback riding with our friends. 

"There was plenty of work for everyone on the farm. I milked 
cows, cleaned milk cans, fed pigs, and raised chickens. That 
summer Mama and I set 10 hens and hatched 100 baby chicks. 
I also weeded the garden and in the fall, of course, I picked 
potatoes. 

"Beverly and I had our ears pierced that fall and we put alcohol 
on them to help them heal. One morning Beverly and I were in 
the bathroom putting the alcohol on our ears before going to the 
field and I fainted. I didn't have to pick potatoes that year. 

"In June 1950, LaVerl and Dale were home on furlough but 
were called back to base because of the Korean War. Dale was 
wounded in September and was sent to a hospital in Tacoma, 
Washington. In January 1951, Daddy, Mama, Marlene, 
Beverly, Judy, and I all went to Tacoma, Washington, to get 
Dale for a furlough. It was a crowded trip home but a very 
happy one. Later, LaVerl was sent to Korea and he was also 
wounded. 

"In March 1951, Daddy decided to try something different than 
farming so we moved to Pocatello, Idaho. We lived in a 



369 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Sandra Lee Sortor 
born July 31, 1951. 



basement apartment at 466 E. Pine Street. Daddy went to 
Alaska to work. Delmer and Ella moved to Pocatello, too, and 
they lived in an apartment on Ninth Street. Delmer went to 
work at Wes Vaco. I enrolled at Pocatello High School and 
finished ninth grade. Marlene didn't go to school the rest of that 
year, but started her sophomore year over the next year with me. 
She quit after a couple of months. 

"On July 31, 1951, Sandra Lee was born. She was a sweet 
baby. Aunt Luella called her Sammy. Aunt Luella and Mama 
were so close and Aunt Luella was always there when Mama 
needed her. 

"When Sandra was only a couple of months old, Judy came 
down with scarlet fever. She was only six and she was very 
sick. Mama had the Elders come and administer to her. Right 
after they left she started to feel better. Mama also got scarlet 
fever but she wasn't nearly as sick as Judy had been. 

"In June 1952, Mama went to Anchorage, Alaska, to be with 
Daddy. She took Judy and Sandra with her. JoAnn Marshall, 
LaVerl's fiance, also went with her. LaVerl was working in 
Alaska and they planned to be married once she got there. 
Mama left Marlene, Beverly, and me at home. The Andersons 
that lived above us were to look after us. Delmer and Ella and 
Aunt Luella also agreed to look after the three of us. At that 
time, we were 17, 15, and 13, respectively. 

"Daddy sent us $20.00 each week for groceries, but we each 
took $5.00 to spend as we wished. That only left $5.00 a week 
for food. Needless to say, we got pretty hungry. Marlene was 
dating her future husband, Bud, at the time, and he took us out 
for hamburgers sometimes, and his mother invited us over to her 
house for dinner and on picnics with them once in a while. One 
night Bud was working and Marlene and I were hungry, so we 
fixed what was in the cupboard to eat: a can of peas and a piece 
of bread. We didn't even bother warming the peas, we just 



370 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 



Luella Colleen Sortor 
born August 23, 1953. 



poured them over the bread and ate our dinner. Beverly was out 
with her boyfriend, Dar, and they had hamburgers. Whenever 
Bud came over, which was quite often, he made sure we had 
something to eat. 

"Mama and Daddy came home the first of September, just 
before school started, and I started my junior year at Pocatello 
High School. Daddy started to work for the Alameda Police 
Department. 

"Uncle Johnnie came to stay at our home during the winter, 
especially after we moved to Pocatello. He had a couple of 
women he was dating. When he got ready to go on a date, he'd 
spend hours in the bathroom and he sang while he was in there. 
When he came out, he smelled so good! The aroma! 

"He also took us for rides in his Studebaker. That car was his 
pride and joy. He always gave us a little money when he came 
and we went to Harry Shimata's and bought us a candy bar. 

"On September 25, 1952, Marlene married Bud Anderson and 
I was her bride's maid. She was just 17 years old. 

"On August 23, 1953, Mama gave birth to her seventh baby girl. 
She had red hair and was a sweet little baby. They named her 
Luella Colleen. 

"That fall I started my senior year at Pocatello (Poky) High. It 
was one of the best years of school. I had great friends and a lot 
of fun: roller-skating, dancing, and drive-in movies. I 
completed my second year of sewing, I've always loved to sew. 
On May 24, 1954, 1 graduated from high school, the first of my 
brothers and sisters to graduate. 

"All the years that I was growing up, I've had a very close and 
loving relationship with Mama and Daddy. I loved all my 
family. And I always went to church, mostly because I wanted 
to, but also because Daddy said if we couldn't get up and get to 



371 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Sunday School on Sunday morning, we couldn't go out on 
Saturday night. 

"On November 8, 1954, 1 met Orville Raymond Bock. He was 
a Marine stationed at the Naval Ordinance Plant here in 
Pocatello. We were engaged two weeks later. Orville was 
transferred overseas to the Philippine Islands in January 1955. 



Richard Leslie Sortor 
born July 25, 1955. 



"When Ricky was born, I was so happy to have a baby brother. 
He was a sweetheart! When he got old enough to talk, he called 
Orville 'Nunny,' I guess that's because I called him 'Honey.' 



"During the year that I was engaged and Orville was away in the 
Philippines, I got a job working on a combine for a local farmer. 
Marlene, JoAnn (LaVerl's wife), and I worked together. We 
needed transportation to and from so we pooled our resources 
(about $30.00, I think) and bought this old, old car. It was a 
Chevrolet or something and it had no lights. We had no 
problem getting out there in the morning but we often worked 
until after dark and it was really hard to get home with no lights. 
We stayed on the back road so we wouldn't get picked up. 
After a while we both quit the job because we both developed 
slight injuries from pulling those heavy weeds and working 
around the chains. 

"In December 1955, Orville returned due to an illness in his 
family and we decided to get married before his leave was over. 
His next transfer was to Pearl Harbor and I wanted to join him 
there. He had to obtain permission from his commanding 
officer in the Philippines. He sent a telegram but, by the time 
the permission came, we didn't have much time left." 

ORVILLE RAYMOND BOCK 



Orville Raymond Bock. 
(Hock, O.Ray, 2005) 



"I was born March 6, 1935, in Anaconda, Montana. My parents 
were Orville Daniel and Delphine Vernice Edwards Bock. 



372 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 



, .....//. >. j, <.~* .1. 




Birth announcement for 
Orville Raymond Bock. 




Orville with his parents, Orville 
Daniel and Delphine Bock. 



Orville Daniel Bock was born June 11, 1910, and Delphine 
Vernice Edwards was born August 31, 1918. My parents were 
married October 24, 1931, in Dillon, Beaverhead County, 
Montana. 

"I am the oldest of 10 children. My brothers and sisters are: 
Charles Thomas Bock, born October 9, 1936; Kenneth Loren 
Bock, born October 8, 1939; Donald Kay Bock, born 
November 22, 1941 ; Delores Fay Bock, born July 23, 1943; Leo 
Darwin Bock, born April 25, 1944; Shirley Ann Bock Corriea, 
born March 30, 1947; Diane Marie Bock Jewett, born April 
1949 (the date is unknown because fire destroyed the records); 
Kathleen Rae Bock Keating, born December 15, 1950; and 
Chester Dale Bock, born February 2, 1953. 

"My mother died on March 1 1, 1953, and my youngest brother, 
Chester Dale, died seven days later on March 19, 1953. I was 
just 18 years old at that time. Then on March 25, 1956, my little 
sister, Delores Fay, died. She was only 12 years old. 

"I grew up in Montana where I attended schools in Butte and 
Sheridan. We also lived for a couple of years in Tacoma, 
Washington, during the Second World War. My dad was in the 
Army. He lived until March 6, 1988. 

"For a few years, I lived with my grandparents, Charles and 
Susan Taylor Bock, in Sheridan, Montana, and that is where I 
graduated from high school. In December 1953, I joined the 
Marine Corps and served in San Diego, California; Pocatello, 
Idaho; Subic Bay, Philippine Islands; Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; and 
Bremerton, Washington. I met my wife, Wanda Lou Sortor, 
while I was stationed in Pocatello." 



373 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



WANDA LOU SORTOR AND ORVILLE RAYMOND 
BOCK 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 




Orville and Wanda were married 
January 2, 1956. 



(Wanda) "Orville and I were married January 2, 1956, in 
Pocatello, Idaho, and he left on January 3, 1956, for Subic Bay, 
Philippines. We had very little time together. I lived with my 
parents, worked, and saved enough money for a plane ticket. It 
took me until July but I finally got enough money saved up and 
bought my ticket. By this time Orville had been reassigned to 
Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 

"The morning I was scheduled to leave, Mama invited everyone 
over for a big breakfast. Grandpa and Grandma Sortor were 
there and Aunt Luella. Also there were Marlene and Bud, 
Delmer and Ella, LaVerl and JoAnn, and my younger sisters, 
Beverly, Judy, Sandra, and Colleen, and our baby brother, 
Ricky. Then everyone went to the airport with me to tell me 
goodby. My mom was not very demonstrative and kept her 
emotions well under control but that morning she cried and 
cried. She said, 'Of all the boys you could have chosen and you 
picked someone who was going to take you clear across the 
ocean.'' I had such a big lump in my throat I could hardly 
swallow. I was happy to go and be with Orville and, yet, when 
I saw Mama like that I didn't want to leave her. 



"I joined Orville in Hawaii and we spent six months there. It 
was a wonderful six-month honeymoon. I got a little homesick 
because I'd never been away from home before. Orville's next 
transfer was to Bremerton, Washington, where we stayed until 
his discharge." 



Orville Raymond Bock. 
(Bock, O. Ray, 2005) 



Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005a) 



(Orville) "After I got out of the Marines, we made our home in 
Pocatello. I worked for 18 years for FMC. Then I started my 
own janitorial business. I finally retired in March 1996." 

(Wanda) "We decided to live in Pocatello because we were 
expecting our first baby and I wanted to be close to Mama. On 



374 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 



Vicki Lou Bock 
born January 23, 1958. 



January 23, 1958, our first baby was born. We named her Vicki 
Lou." 



"When Vicki was a baby, I dressed her in those fancy little 
nylon dresses and kept her clean all the time. Vicki was sick a 
lot and, on one of Uncle Johnnie's visits, he told me she needed 
to get dirty once in awhile. He told me if I'd let him take her 
home with him, he'd let her play in the dirt and she'd be 
healthy. He was probably right but I never could let her go. I 
was just that fussy with all my girls. They had to be clean, hair 
in ringlets, and dressed before they could play. 



Barbara Jean Bock 
born July 10, 1959. 

Sheri Jo Bock 
born September 30, 1961. 



"Our second daughter, Barbara Jean (Bobbi), was born July 10, 
1959, and our last child, Sheri Jo, was born September 30, 
1961." 

On June 5, 1969, Orville and Wanda were sealed to each other 
in the Idaho Falls temple and Vicki Lou, Barbara Jean, and 
Sheri Jo were sealed to them. 



Wanda Lou Sortor. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "I was fortunate to be able to be a stay-at-home mom 
and always be there for my girls. Orville bought me a sewing 
machine when Bobbi was a baby and I sewed all of my girl's 
clothes. When they were in junior high, I taught them to sew 
and they made their own clothes after that. 



"Orville has always been a wonderful husband, father, and 
grandfather. He loves his family unconditionally." 



Howard Leslie Sortor 
died November 17, 1997. 

Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
died September 10, 1998. 



Wanda and her sisters worked together to care for their mother, 
Ruby, following a massive stroke she suffered in about 1992. 
Wanda's father passed away on November 17, 1997, and Ruby 
eventually moved into Colleen's home. The brothers and their 
wives, and sisters living in the Pocatello area continued to care 
for their mom until she passed away on September 10, 1998. 



375 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Wanda Lou Sortor. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "The worst three days of my life were the days that 
Daddy, Mama, and Dale died. I miss them so much. 

"My greatest pleasure in life is spending time with my girls and 
their families. Whenever Judy is in town, Beverly, Colleen, 
Sandra, Judy, and I all get together for a good visit. My other 
pleasures include sewing, crocheting (thanks to my dear 
Mother), reading, collecting porcelain dolls, and traveling. 

"Beverly and Ray moved next door to Bobbi last October so we 
all live in the same little community and enjoy getting together 
to barbeque and just visit. Most nights this summer, we have 
gathered in Bobbi's yard to visit and enjoy the beauty of the 
evening." 




Tony Raymond Bock. 



Wanda and Orville will celebrate their 50 th wedding anniversary 
on January 2, 2006. They have three daughters, seven 
grandchildren, and three great grandchildren: 

Vicki Lou Bock was born January 23, 1958. She and James 
Root have been married for 18 years. Vicki Lou is a wonderful 
daughter, and she and Jim do a lot to help Orville and me. Vicki 
works at Hancock Fabric where she sews many of the displays. 
Vicki has two sons, one step-son, three grandchildren, and two 
step-grandchildren: 

Tony Raymond Bock was born March 21, 1978. When 
Tony was born, he looked just like Orville. 

(Wanda) "When we first saw Tony, Orville and I both cried 
because he was so beautiful. He used to cry when they 
wanted to take him home because he loved being with me. 
When he was two years old, he said, "Gramma, why do I 
remember crying for you when I was still with Heavenly 
Father? ' I truly believe he is the same little spirit baby boy 
I miscarried when I was 34 years old. He has always been 
very special to us. Tony lived with us from the time he was 
in third grade until he was out of high school. He now lives 



376 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 



in Gooding, Idaho, where he owns a painting company 
called 'Long Stroke Painting.'" 

Andrew LaMont Cominotti was born October 9, 1979. He 
is the father of two boys and one daughter. 

Barbara Jean (Bobbi) Bock was born July 10, 1959. She is 
married to Victor Cedeno. Bobbi's first daughter, Vikki Jo, was 
stillborn. Bobbi suffered with toxemia. Bobbi's second 
daughter, Mary Lou, was born nine weeks early and weighed 
two pounds 13 ounces. She is our miracle baby. Bobbi worked 
at Ballard Medical but quit when Mary Lou became ill so she 
could care for her and take her to her many doctor appointments 
in Salt Lake City. Bobbi lives next door to us and is a 
wonderful daughter. She does so much for us. 




Mary Lou Cedeno, age 16. 



Mary Lou Cedeno was born April 14, 1989. She is a 
beautiful girl and a sweetheart. She will be a junior in high 
school and is a third-year Indianette Dancer at Pocatello 
High School. She has been dancing since she was three 
years old. Mary Lou has a rare autoimmune disease called 
Dermatomyositis. It destroys the muscles. Mary Lou was 
granted a wish from the 'Make A Wish' Foundation. She 
had a wonderful vacation in Hawaii with Bobbi. Orville 
and I went along for the fun. After three years of steroid 
treatments, the great care of her doctors in Pocatello and 
Salt Lake City, and the blessing she received, she is in 
remission and able to go back to the dancing she loves. 
Mary Lou is 16 years old. 

Sheri Jo Bock was born October 17, 1960. She married Robert 
Peterson. They were married for 18 years, and lived in 
Washington and Nevada. Their marriage ended in divorce in 
2002. Until recently, Sheri was attending school in Salt Lake 
City, Utah. 



377 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



In November 2005, she and her two daughters moved to Ann 
Arbor, Michigan. Sheri Jo is a wonderful daughter and we will 
miss them. She has three children who are special to us: 




Chantyl Peterson. 



Jared Peterson was born December 3, 1985, and is a 
wonderful young man. He has been working full time and 
attending night school in Elko, Nevada. In January 2006, 
he will attend Boise State University where his major will 
be Physics. We have a special bond with Jared. Tony and 
Jared are more like brothers than cousins. They have a 
great relationship and get together whenever they can. 

Chantyl Peterson was born June 1 1, 1988, and will be a 
junior in high school this fall. She attended Pocatello High 
School with Mary Lou during September and October 
2005, then left with her mom for Michigan. Chantyl is a 
beautiful girl. She had Aplastic Anemia, and the only cure 
was a bone marrow transplant, which was performed when 
she was five years old. Her donor was a New York City 
firefighter named Terry Farrell. We went to New York and 
met Terry and his family a year after the transplant. Terry 
was tragically killed at the World Trade Center on 
September 1 1 , 2001 . Chantyl was given a wish with 'Make 
A Wish' Foundation. She took her family on the Disney 
big red boat. Chantyl is now a healthy 17-year old, thanks 
to Terry. 



Savanya Peterson was born June 8, 1993. Savanya lived 
with Orville and me for five months while her mother 
attended school in Salt Lake City. She attended seventh 
grade in Pocatello at Irving Middle School. Savanya is 
excited to be with her mother again. 



378 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 










Pictures from Orville's childhood include his grandfather, Charles Bock (upper left), grandmother, 
Suzy Bock (upper right), Orville and his cousin, Gert (lower left), and Orville at age 15 (lower 
right). All courtesy Orville and Wanda Lou Bock. 



379 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Bock cousins. 
Included are, back 
row, L to R: Gert, 
Orville, Bud, Bob, and 
Bill. Middle row, L to 
R: Janet, unknown, 
Dan. Front row, L to 
R: Shirley, Delores, 
Leo, unknown, Ken, 
and unknown. Diane 
is in front of Delores. 
Circa 1952. Courtesy 
Orville Raymond 
Bock. 




Pictured below are four of the Bock brothers,: L to R: Dan Bock, Leo Bock, Bud Bock, and Orville 
Bock. Courtesy Orville Raymond Bock. 




3X0 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 




When Wanda was leaving to join Orville in Hawaii, the family came to see her off. She is shown 
(upper left) with Colleen, Sandra, Marlene, Wanda, Grandma Sortor, Beverly and Judy. Pictured 
(top right) are: Wanda, Bud Anderson, Ruby holding Ricky, Beverly, Howard, and Judy. Sandra is 
in front. 




Pictured (above left) are: Marlene, Wanda, Grandpa Sortor, Beverly, and Judy. Sandra and Colleen 
are in front. Pictured (above right) are: Marlene, Beverly, Ruby, Wanda, and Judy. The three little 
ones in front are Colleen, Sandra, and Ricky. Circa July 1956. Courtesy Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 



381 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 







K 



i 




Orville was in the Marines stationed in Hawaii and Wanda Lou met him there in July 1956. The 
photo (above left) is dated January 27, 1957. Orville and Wanda again visited Hawaii in 2004 
accompanied by their daughter, Bobbi Cedeno (above far right) and granddaughter, Mary Lou 
Cedeno (above, middle). Wanda collects dolls and a small 
sampling of her collection is shown below (left and right). 
Also, one of the many doilies she has made is shown with 
the doll at bottom left. Courtesy Wanda Lou Bock. 





3X2 



Wanda Lou Sortor and Orville Raymond Bock 





Sheri Jo Bock Peterson 
(right) and her three 
children, Jared, Chantyl, 
and Savanya (left). 



Barbara Jean (Bobbi) and Victor Cedeno (below 
right) and their daughter, Mary Lou. Circa 1995. 
Tony Raymond Bock (below left) is the son of 
Vicki Lou Root. 





HHnu : '-iwllir 1 ^ 




383 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Vicki Lou Bock Root with her oldest son, Tony Raymond Bock. 



3X4 



Chapter 20 
BEVERLY JOYCE SORTOR 

AND 
AUSTIN RAYGENE HENSON 




^^■IHMMH 



Beverly Joyce Sortor Henson and her daughter, 
Darla Rae Arnold Corpus. 



Information for this chapter provided by 
Beverly Joyce Sortor Henson. 
Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Ruby Nada Madsen 

Born: 4 April 1915, Cache, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 10 Sep 1998, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 1 7 Nov 1 997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Beverly Joyce Sortor 

Born: 14 Sep 1938, Sugar City, Madison, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Austin Raygene Henson 

Born: 28 Apr 1 93 1 , Belle City, Maries, Missouri 
Died: Living 



Darla Rae Arnold 

Born: 18 Dec 1954, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



James Leslie Henson 

Born: 18 Dec 1960, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Danny Ray Henson 

Born: 18 Oct 1962, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Kimberly Jo Henson 

Born: 12 Aug 1970, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Beverly Joyce Sortor and Austin Raygene Henson 



BEVERLY JOYCE SORTOR 



1938 



Beverly Joyce Sortor Henson. 
(Henson, Beverly S., 2005b) 

Beverly Joyce Sortor 
born September 14, 1938. 




Ruby Sortor holding Beverly Jean. 



(Beverly) "I was born September 14, 1938, in Sugar City, 
Madison County, Idaho. I was the third child born to Howard 
Leslie and Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor. I have two older sisters: 
Marlene and Wanda; and three brothers: Delmer, LaVerl, and 
Dale. My parents moved us back to Tetonia, Idaho, while I was 
still quite young. Then we moved to Sugar City, Idaho Falls, 
Firth, American Falls, and Pocatello. 

"I started school while we were living in Firth, Idaho. The 
school was a one-room building where first through eighth 
grade attended. Mrs. Brewington was the teacher and I was the 
only first grader. 

On March 1, 1947, Beverly was baptized a member of The 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The family was 
living in Idaho Falls at that time, and Beverly attended Eagle 
Rock Elementary School. 

(Beverly) "Just two days before Thanksgiving in 1948, our 
house burned down. We lost virtually everything we owned. 



Beverly Joyce Sortor Henson. 
(Henson, Beverly S., 2005b) 



"The next spring, we moved to American Falls and I attended 
sixth grade there. When I was in seventh grade, we moved to 
Pocatello and I attended Alameda Junior High and Pocatello 
High School." 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "Beverly and I had our ears pierced in the fall of 1950 
and we put alcohol on them to help them heal. One morning 
Beverly and I were in the bathroom pouring the alcohol on our 
ears before going to the field and I fainted. I didn't have to pick 
potatoes that year." 



In 1951, Howard Sortor decided to try something different and 
went to Alaska to work. In June 1952, Ruby took Judy and 
Sandra and went to Alaska to be with Howard. She left Beverly, 



387 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Wanda, and Marlene at home. The upstairs neighbors, Aunt 
Luella, and Delmer and Ella all agreed to look after the girls. 



Beverly Joyce Sortor Henson. 
(Henson, Beverly S., 2005b) 



(Beverly) "Uncle Johnnie stayed at our house every winter, 
especially after the folks moved to Pocatello. We loved to see 
him come because we knew he would give us each a little 
money and we could go to the little store and buy a candy bar. 







Beverly Sortor with her brother, Dale. 



Darla Rae Arnold 
born December 18, 1954. 



"In 1953, I married at a very young age and really picked 
wrong. We weren't married very long when my marriage fell 
apart and, in 1954, 1 got a divorce. I was pregnant with my little 
girl, Darla Rae Arnold, so I moved home and got a job to help 
support myself and my baby. While I was pregnant, I craved 
rhubarb and that sweetheart, Aunt Luella, kept me supplied by 
stealing it from other people's gardens. She was pretty brash, 
but a lot of fun. I am a lot like her, I love to kid around and 
have a good time! 

"When I was in labor with Darla Rae, Aunt Luella and Wanda 
went to the hospital with me. Mom didn't go, she was too 
sensitive to be part of that kind of ordeal. We went to 
St. Anthony Hospital in Pocatello. At that time the labor room 
was just that, one big room filled with beds, divided by drawn 
curtains, with all these women in various stages of labor. Aunt 
Luella was so tender-hearted that she ran from bed to bed 
saying, l Are you having a pain, honey? Are you having a pain?' 
She was all over the ward tending to all those women and then 
back to me. What a sight. Darla Rae was born December 18, 
1954. 



"I had a very difficult time after my divorce and Uncle Johnnie 
did everything he could to make life a little easier for me. He 
and I had long talks about everything. He often came down- 
stairs to my room to spend time with me and make sure I was 
doing okay, and sometimes he gave me a little money. 



.WX 



Beverly Joyce Sortor and Austin Raygene Henson 



"Uncle Johnnie loved little kids and really enjoyed Darla. He 
often put her to bed at night for me and you could hear him, with 
that distinctive voice, singing her to sleep. It was Uncle Johnnie 
who potty-trained Darla. He tried to get me to bring Darla and 
come live with him in the Basin so he could help me with her. 
I've often wondered how different my life would have been if 
I'd chosen to do that. 

; 'Years ago I took Uncle Johnnie to a drive-in theater. It was his 
first time! We took his red Studebaker but I drove. Once we 
were parked, I told him to roll his window down and put the 
speaker box on it, then roll it back up. When the movie started, 
I told him to turn the little knob so we could hear the sound. He 
turned it too far and sound blasted out. It startled him and he 
said, ' These gall danged new-fangled contraptions; what '11 they 
think of next?' 

"In 1958, 1 met my husband, Austin Ray gene Henson." 

AUSTIN RAYGENE (RAY) HENSON 

Austin Ray gene Henson was born April 28, 1931, in Belle City, 
Maries County, Missouri. His parents were John Wesley and 
Aura Matheney Henson. John Wesley Henson was born May 3, 
1894, in Missouri. Aura Matheney was born February 12, 1896, 
in Tennessee. They were married in 1913, at Bloomfield, 
Missouri. Ray has seven brothers and eight sisters. In 1942, the 
family moved to Gooding, Idaho, where the children were 
raised. Most of Ray's family have passed away as of this 
writing. 

In 1956, Ray moved to Pocatello, Idaho, where he met Beverly 
Joyce Sortor. 



389 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



BEVERLY JOYCE SORTOR AND AUSTIN RAYGENE 
HENSON 



1959 



Beverly Joyce Sortor and 

Austin Raygene Henson 

married May 30, 1959. 

Conversation. 
(Henson, Beverly S., 2005a) 



James Leslie Henson 
born May 3, 1960. 

Danny Ray Henson 
born October 18, 1962. 

Kimberly Jo Henson 
born August 12, 1970. 



(Beverly) "On May 30, 1959, I married Ray Henson. 
worked for Simplot for 38 years before he retired. 



He 



"I've worked ever since I was first married and that limits my 
time for crafty things. Mom crocheted all the time and I had a 
desire to learn how to crochet. I sat next to her and she told me 
stitch by stitch how to do it. When I thought I had it down, I'd 
go home and work on it. Soon, my crocheted piece would be 
completely messed up and back to Mom I'd go. She took one 
look at my crocheting and laughed. She used to call me a dumb 
cluck because I just could not figure it out. Finally, I bought a 
crochet instruction book and practiced until I could crochet. 
Mom was so proud of me when I showed her what I'd 
accomplished! Now I crochet all the time just like Mom. After 
my housework is done, I pick up my crocheting and spend 
hours. I get lost in my project." 



Howard Leslie Sortor 
died November 17, 1997. 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
died September 10, 1998. 



Beverly and her brothers and sisters worked together to care for 
their mother, Ruby, following a massive stroke she suffered in 
about 1992. Beverly's father passed away on November 17, 
1997, and Ruby eventually moved into Colleen's home. The 
brothers and sisters living in the Pocatello area continued to care 
for their mom until she passed away on September 10, 1998. 



Conversation. 
(Henson, Beverly S., 2005a) 



(Beverly) "Ray and I recently stopped in Firth to visit Connie 
Martin and her husband, Richard. Connie and Ray had not met 
previously and Connie was intrigued by his Southern accent. 
She finally asked him if he would teach her how to speak with 
a Southern accent so she could travel to Nashville and sing. 



"I love to read, crochet, and spend time with our family. Our 
children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren are the biggest 
joy of our lives." 



390 



Beverly Joyce Sortor and Austin Raygene Henson 



Darla Rae Arnold was born December 18, 1954. She and Jay 
Corpus were married on June 28, 1975. They have one son, 
Jayson Darrell Corpus, born December 17, 1976. Darla and Jay 
were divorced in 2003. Darla lives in Pocatello, Idaho. 

Jayson Darrell Corpus married Emilee Larsen on 
October 20, 1995, in the Logan Temple. They have four 
children: Andrew Darrell, born September 6, 1997; 
Cameron Lee, born July 1, 1999; Mikaela Jane, born 
April 17, 2002; and Emma Katherine, born January 4, 2005. 
Jayson is a Registered Nurse and works at Portneuf Medical 
Center as a clinical director for the operating room. They 
live in Chubbuck, Idaho. 

James Leslie Henson was born May 3, 1960. He attended 
Lewis and Clark Elementary School, Alameda Junior High, and 
Pocatello High School. James also attended Votech where he 
studied welding. He married Linda Robin Sharp in 1979 at 
Pocatello. James and Robin live in Chandler, Arizona, where he 
worked for John Mansfield until his retirement five years ago. 
James was diagnosed with M.S. Robin works for Tolt Service 
Group. James and Robin have two children: 

Jaime Rae Henson was born November 29, 1979. She lives 
in Chandler, Arizona, where she works for Kinkos. She has 
one daughter, Mya Rayne Ames. 

Evan Raygene Henson was born November 23, 1982. He 
lives in Phoenix, Arizona, and works for Tolt Service 
Group. 

Danny Ray Henson was born October 18, 1962. He attended 
Lewis and Clark Elementary School, Alameda Junior High, and 
Pocatello High School. Danny served two years in the U.S. 
Army in Germany. He married Lisa Whittier on August 18, 
1986. Danny works for Premier Technology and Lisa works for 
Health and Welfare in American Falls, Idaho. 



391 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



They live in Pingree, Idaho. Lisa has one son, Jesse, from a 
previous marriage. 

Kimberly Jo Henson was born August 12, 1970, at Boise, 
Idaho. She was adopted by Ray and Beverly when she was just 
12 days old. Kimberly attended Lewis and Clark Elementary 
School, Alameda Junior High, and Pocatello High School. She 
graduated from Idaho State University with a degree in 
economics. Kimberly married Eric Forbis on January 25, 1994. 
They had one daughter, Jordyn Joy, born June 3, 1995. Kim and 
Eric were divorced in 1997. Kim married Chris Bartos on 
July 25, 1999. They have two daughters: Cassidy Marie, born 
November 7, 2001, at Gig Harbor, Washington; and Dylan Ruth, 
born July 7, 2003, at Tucson, Arizona. Kim and Chris were 
divorced in 2004. Kim is a manager for Target and lives in 
Tucson, Arizona. 



392 



Beverly Joyce Sortor and Austin Raygene Henson 




John Wesley and Aura Matheney Henson, parents of Austin Raygene Henson. 



393 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Kimberly Jo Henson (right) with her three 
daughters (L to R) Cassidy Marie, Dylan 
Ruth, and Jordyn Joy. Courtesy Beverly 
Joyce Henson. 



Five generations (below) with Ruby Nada 
Sortor seated in middle. Back, L to R: 
Beverly Jean Sortor holding Andrew Darrell 
Corpus, Jayson Darrell Corpus, and Darla Rae 
Arnold Corpus. Circa 1997. Courtesy 
Beverly Joyce Henson. 





m 



Chapter 21 
JUDY JEAN SORTOR 

AND 
DAN CRAIG GILLIES 




Three little sisters: Judy, Colleen, and Sandra Sortor. 



Information for this chapter provided 

by Judy Jean Sortor Gillies 

and several of her sisters. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Ruby Nada Madsen 

Born: 4 April 1915, Cache, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 1 Sep 1 998, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 


^ t 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 17 Nov 1997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Judy Jean Sortor 

Born: 14 Jun 1945, Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Dan Craig Gillies 



Born: 



Died: Living 



Dan Sheldon Gillies 






Born: 


3 Sep 1966, Pocatello, 


Bannock, 


Idaho 


Died: 


Living 







David Craig Gillies 

Born: 3 Mar 1970, Scottsdale, Maricopa, Arizona 
Died: Living 



Anthony Samuel Gillies 

Born: 6 Feb 1974, Scottsdale, Maricopa, Arizona 
Died: Living 



Robert Christian Gillies 

Born: 30 Jan 1979, Scottsdale, Maricopa, Arizona 
Died: Living 



Judy Jean Sortor Gillies 



JUDY JEAN SORTOR 



1945 



Judy Jean Sortor 
born June 14, 1945. 



On June 14, 1945, Judy Jean Sortor was born in Shelley, 
Bingham County, Idaho. She is the fifth daughter of Howard 
Leslie and Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor. Judy has three older 
brothers and four older sisters: Howard Delmer, LaVerl Dean, 
Dale George, Erma Marlene, Wanda Lou, Beverly Joyce, and 
Ruby Darlene (who died at birth). Judy's father was farming in 
the Firth area at that time. 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



(Wanda) "I was so thrilled to have a little sister that I refused to 
go outside to play. I wanted to stay in and take care of Judy. 
When she was six month old, she got pneumonia and had to go 
to the hospital. We were so happy when she got better and came 
home." 



Judy Jean Sortor Gillies. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2005) 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 



Telephone Conversation. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



Wanda Lou Sortor Bock. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005b) 

Sandra Lee Sortor 
born July 31, 1951. 



(Judy) "I was told later, Aunt Luella came to the hospital every 
day when I had pneumonia. Every time the nurses approached 
with a syringe of penicillin, I started to cry, so Aunt Luella 
nicknamed me 'penicillin.'" 

(Wanda) "Two days before Thanksgiving 1948, our house 
burned down. The fire started in the middle of the night and we 
were unable to save anything except the new coats Mama had 
bought for us. The next spring we moved to American Falls." 

(Judy) "Dad carried a baby picture of me in his wallet and that 
is the only picture of me that survived the fire." 

(Wanda) "In March 1951, we moved to Pocatello and Daddy 
decided to try something different. He got a job with a 
construction company in Anchorage, Alaska. Sandra was born 
July 3 1 , 195 1 . In June 1 952, Mama went to Alaska to be with 
Daddy. She took Judy, who was six years old, and Sandra, who 
was nearly one, with her. She left Marlene, Beverly, and me at 
home." 



397 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Beverly Joyce Sortor Henson. 
(Henson, Beverly S. 2005b) 




Judy Jean Sortor at about age two. 

Judy Jean Sortor Gillies. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2005) 




Judy Jean Sortor in her dance 
costume. 



(Beverly) "Judy came down with scarlet fever. She was only six 
and she was very sick. Mama had the Elders come and 
administer to her. Right after they left she started to feel better. 
Mama also got scarlet fever but she wasn't nearly as sick as 
Judy had been." 

(Judy) "I remember when I came down with scarlet fever. I 
loved school from my first day of kindergarten and never 
wanted to miss one day. Mom brushed my hair in the morning 
to help me get ready. One September morning when I was in 
first grade, I didn't feel well but still wanted to go to school. 
Instead of taking the hair brush to Mom, I asked her if she could 
come to where I was sitting and brush my hair. That tipped her 
off that I didn't feel well so she insisted I stay home that day. 
Later that day, Mom received a check in the mail from Daddy, 
who was working in Alaska. 

"These were fun days when Mom went shopping. Aunt Luella 
went with Mom, baby Sandra, and me (this was one of the few 
times I remember Mom driving until I was a teenager). When 
we got to Albertson's on Clark and Sixth, I really wanted to go 
in but felt too dizzy so I lay down in the back seat. Mom and 
Aunt Luella became very worried because this was not normal 
behavior for me. A couple of days later, I was running a fever, 
so Mom took me to Doctor Howard who diagnosed me with 
scarlet fever. My fever was so high, the skin on my hands 
blistered and peeled. Mom got the illness from me. 
Fortunately, Sandra didn't get it nor did anyone else in the 
family. 

"I recovered and returned to school, but one day I came home 
from school very sick again. I went back to school too soon and 
had a relapse. Beverly and Wanda asked our neighbor, 
Mrs. Gladys Anderson, to come help me. 

"I was away from school for several weeks and was way behind 
the rest of the class in reading. My teacher, Mrs. Staddaheur, 
used a long pointer to tap each word on a flash chart. The 



V)X 



Judy Jean Sortor Gillies 




Judy Jean Sortor. 



students took turns saying the word. My word was 'and,' 
however, I guessed 'they' (remember I had been absent nearly 
all semester). Mrs. Staddaheur just tapped the word again and 
went to the next student behind me, Dee Wheeler, who said the 
correct word. I was not only embarrassed but felt so stupid. 
However, that snub from my first grade teacher did not deter me 
from learning to read. 

"By second grade, I was the teacher's helper along with some 
other students. My teacher, Mrs. Marlene Snyder, was the most 
wonderful woman in the world. She was pretty, kind, and very 
smart. Mrs. Snyder had long, black hair that she wore curled up 
on the ends and kind of wavy in the back. She wore knit suits, 
high-heels, and matching necklaces and earrings. And best of 
all, she smiled all the time. One day shortly after the first of the 
year, I was late coming home and Mom began to worry. Her 
fears were laid to rest when she learned I was still in my 
classroom listening to other students read. Throughout 
elementary school, I continued to be a student tutor. 



"Both of my parents loved reading and passed that love on to 
their children. Daddy was good at math and Mom was fantastic 
at spelling. I was involved in a spelling bee when I was in the 
sixth grade and Mom helped me prepare by saying the words 
and listening to me spell them out loud. She knew when I'd 
made a mistake without ever looking at the printed words." 



Luella Colleen Sortor 
born August 23, 1953. 

Richard Leslie Sortor 
born July 25, 1955. 

Various conversations. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



On July 1 1 , 1953, Judy was baptized a member of The Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

(Judy) "When I was young, I just loved the mineral water from 
Hooper Springs. My grandmother made root beer with it. 
There probably isn't enough gold to bribe me to drink it now." 



399 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Judy Jean Gillies. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2005) 



Judy's father obtained a job as a policeman with the Alameda 
Police Department. In 1955, he was appointed chief of both the 
police and fire departments for the City of Alameda, positions 
he held until Alameda was annexed to Pocatello. 




Judy Jean about the time she 

graduated from high school. 

Circa 1963. 



(Judy) "Mom started working outside the home when I was 16. 
She found a job at Lamb Weston, which was hard physical 
work. Mom encouraged me to take as many business classes as 
possible in high school. She told me that office work would be 
so much better than the work she did. These talks about typing, 
shorthand, and bookkeeping were pivotal in my life. The 
connection between education and career seemed clear. 

"Daddy read the Bible frequently and engaged in lively debates 
with my Grandpa Sortor. Mom didn't join the debates but, once 
the topic changed, she quietly stated her opinion. The church 
was very important to Mom. She embraced the gospel with her 
whole being. Mom served many years in Primary, and was a 
faithful Relief Society teacher. Many times she demonstrated 
the power of fasting and prayer. Mom was thrilled when, in 
1966, she and Daddy were sealed in the temple. Sandra, 
Colleen, Ricky, Wanda and Orville, and Beverly and Ray, were 
able to attend. That day remained a high point in her life." 



The family continued to live in Pocatello and Judy attended 
schools there, graduating from Pocatello High School in 1963. 



Various conversations. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "My mother was very spiritual and very wise. She was 
a woman of few words but her words often had deep meaning. 
For example, on the eve of my wedding, I expected my mom to 
give me a little talk about the marriage night and so on, but my 
mom's advise to me was to remember I had a name and I should 
make my husband use it. 



"I later knew she was telling me to maintain my own identity 
and not lose who I was in being someone's wife. And, when 
motherhood came to me, she meant that the title 'Mom or 
Mother' was reserved for my children. The responsibilities of 



100 



Judy Jean Sortor Gillies 



marriage and motherhood should not take away a woman's self- 
worth but should enhance it. That little talk has stayed with me 
for a lifetime." 

JUDY JEAN SORTOR AND DAN CRAIG GILLIES 



Dan Sheldon Gillies 
born September 3, 1966. 



In about 1965, Judy married Dan Craig Gillies. Her first son, 
Dan Sheldon Gillies, was born September 3, 1966. Judy 
continued her education at Idaho State University graduating 
with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1968. Judy and her family 
moved to Illinois. 



(Judy) "Years ago, after I was married, Mom and Marlene came 
to visit me in Illinois. We visited Nauvoo and had a marvelous 
time. The storms in Illinois are a bit more severe than in Idaho. 
Mom was very frightened by the lightning and thunder. Of 
course, my family was used to it and slept through everything, 
which was difficult for Mom to understand." 



David Craig Gillies 
born March 3, 1970. 



The family later moved to Scottsdale, Arizona. Judy's second 
son, David Craig Gillies, was born March 10, 1970. In 1971, 
when David was just a baby, Judy went to work for Motorola in 
Material Management. She was also attending classes at 
Arizona State University. 



Anthony Samuel Gillies 
born February 6, 1974. 



Judy gave birth to her third son, Anthony Samuel Gillies, on 
February 6, 1974. Later that same year she completed her 
studies at the Graduate Business School at Arizona State 
University. 



Robert Christian Gillies 
born January 30, 1979. 



Judy continued to work for Motorola until 1979. 

Robert Christian Gillies, Judy's fourth son, was born 
January 30, 1979, at Scottsdale, Arizona. 



Various conversations. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "Later, I moved my boys back to Pocatello and Mom was 
extremely supportive of my children in their church activities. 
She attended all Priesthood advancements and made sure she 



401 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



was in the congregation to hear every talk they gave. She 
prayed daily throughout her life for her children and 
grandchildren." 

Judy moved back to Pocatello, Idaho, and again attended classes 
at Idaho State University. In 1984, she received her second 
bachelors degree, this time in Science and Finance. In 1985, she 
went to work for Westinghouse in Scoville, Idaho, where she 
was a purchasing manager. She stayed with Westinghouse until 
1988, when she was hired by Simplot at Pocatello, Idaho, in 
Technical Services and, later, as Director of Transportation. She 
was later transferred to Boise, Idaho, where she now lives. 



Judy Jean Sortor Gillies. 
(Gillies, Judy S., 2005) 




Maxine Douglass Trout and 
Judy Sortor Gillies. 2004. 



(Judy) "Daddy and Mom were both good citizens and exercised 
their right to vote. Mom kept her vote private. She often said 
to Daddy, 'The voting booths are private for a reason. ' Daddy 
joined the Alameda Police Department during my second grade 
in school and later became Chief of Police. This contributed to 
his involvement in local politics. My parent's interest in politics 
influenced me to stay informed and participate in the political 
forum. I have voted in every election, local as well as national, 
since turning 21 years old in 1966. I always learn as much as 
possible about each candidate, the party platform, and what the 
long-term consequences of each initiative will be prior to 
casting my vote. I have served as President of the League of 
Women Voters and been active in political campaigns for 
various local and national candidates. When a cause demands 
public protesting, you'll see me waving a sign. 



"My sons were raised discussing current events and political 
campaigns at the dinner table. Everyone was allowed an 
opinion as long as that opinion was based on fact, not emotion. 
Now that my sons are adults, our discussions are quite 
passionate. The fun continues with my grandchildren. 

"My parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, and siblings all 
contributed to who I am today. I learned many things from my 
various family members. Among them are: family love and 



102 



Judy Jean Sortor Gillies 




Judy with three of her grandchildren: 

Evan Drake, Hailey Marie, and Nolan 

Jacob Gillies. Circa 2004. 



strength, work ethic, moral values, good citizenship 
responsibility, and spiritual beliefs. Mom taught me many 
lifelong skills including how to crochet, embroider, cook/can, 
yarn tie quilts, and care for children. I will always regret not 
learning from my Mom how to hand quilt or make candy. Both 
of my parents taught me compassion and the art of helping those 
in need. Our family holiday table often contained guests from 
from outside the family. Mom and Daddy opened their home to 
everyone. One frequent guest was Mrs. Corder. She was a 
widow whom my parents more or less 'adopted.' 

"Having several siblings makes life growing up very interesting, 
especially when there is only one bathroom and a limited 
number of bedrooms. 

"Being grown up is a rewarding time of life and provides the 
opportunity to know one's siblings as adults and see who they 
have become." 



Judy and Craig were later divorced. Judy has worked for 
Simplot for many years and looks forward to retiring in the near 
future. 

Judy has four sons and five grandchildren: 

Dan Sheldon Gillies was born September 3, 1966, in Pocatello, 
Idaho. Dan has one son, Morgan Tomas, born June 16, 1992. 
On December 2, 2005, he married Yvonne Scott. 

David Craig Gillies was born March 3, 1970, at Scottsdale, 
Arizona. David has four children: Evan Drake, born 
November 4, 1989; Hailey Marie, born March 30, 1991; Nolan 
Jacob, born December 2, 1994; and Connor Ward, born 
August 22, 2001. 



403 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Anthony Samuel Gillies was born February 6, 1974, at 
Scottsdale, Arizona. He is married and lives in Boise, Idaho. 

Robert Christian Gillies was born January 30, 1979, in 
Scottsdale, Arizona. He is engaged to be married in May 2006. 



404 



Chapter 22 
SANDRA LEE SORTOR 

AND 
DAVID TARBET 




John Tarbet, 

Sandra Lee 

Sortor Tarbet, 

David Tarbet, 

and Stephanie 

Tarbet. 

Circa 1985. 



Information for 

this chapter provided 

by Sandra Lee Sortor Tarbet and some of her sisters. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Ruby Nada Madsen 

Born: 4 April 1915, Cache, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 1 Sep 1 998, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 17 Nov 1997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Sandra Lee Sortor 

Bom: 31 July 1951, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: David Tarbet 

Bora: 1 8 May 1 947, Tremonton, Box Elder, Utah 
Died: Living 



Stephanie Tarbet 

Born: 13 Jun 1977, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



John Tarbet 

Born: 30 Aug 1982, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Sandra Lee Sortor and David Tarbet 



SANDRA LEE SORTOR 



1951 



Sandra Lee Sortor 
born July 31, 1951. 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005b) 

Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005a) 




Sandra Lee Sortor. April 1955. 



Luella Colleen Sortor 
born August 23, 1953. 

Richard Leslie Sortor 
born July 25, 1955. 



Sandra Lee Sortor is the sixth daughter born to Howard Leslie 
and Ruby Nada Sortor. She was born July 31, 1951, at 
Pocatello, Bannock County, Idaho. Her older brothers and 
sisters include: Howard Delmer, LaVerl Dean, Dale George, 
Erma Marlene, Wanda Lou, Beverly Joyce, Ruby Darlene, who 
died at birth, and Judy Jean. 

At the time Sandra was born, her father was working for a 
construction company in Anchorage, Alaska. He came home to 
be present for her birth. 

(Connie) "We went to visit Aunt Ruby after Sandra was born. 
She was one of the most beautiful babies I've ever seen. Really 
a gorgeous little thing with beautiful hair." 

(Wanda) "Sandra Lee was born in July 1951. She was such a 
sweet baby. Aunt Luella called her Sammy. Aunt Luella and 
Mama were so close. Aunt Luella was always there when 
Mama needed her. 

"When Sandra was only a couple of months old, Judy came 
down with scarlet fever. Fortunately, Sandra didn't get sick. 

"In June 1952, Mama went to Anchorage, Alaska, to be with 
Daddy. She took Judy and Sandra with her. JoAnn Marshall, 
LaVerl' s fiance, also went with her. LaVerl was also working 
in Alaska and he and JoAnn planned to be married once she got 
there. Mama left Marlene, Beverly, and me at home." 

In 1953, Sandra's father began working for the Alameda Police 
Department. Howard was later put in as chief of both the fire 
and police departments. When Alameda became part of 
Pocatello, Howard no longer worked for the city. 



407 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Conversation. 
(Tarbet, Sandra S., 2006) 



(Sandra) "By the time Colleen, Ricky, and I were born, our 
parents were older, more relaxed, and our brothers and sisters 
were pretty much grown. Most of them were out of the house 
so we were really pampered. We had such a wonderful 
childhood. I was never spanked. We were very mischievous 
but most of the time Mom and Daddy just laughed about our 
pranks. I guess we were really over-protected because I don't 
remember any really bad times." 



Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005a) 



(Wanda) "I remember one Christmas when Sandra was four and 
Colleen was two years old, the Montgomery Ward Store had a 
Santa Claus and Mom took them to get their pictures taken. 
Colleen was frightened of Santa and ran off and I had to chase 
her through the store to bring her back. We have a really cute 
picture of Sandra and me with Santa. None with Colleen." 



Conversation. 
(VanLeuvan, Colleen S., 2006) 















i *%£~i^nM 




T ^* *" 


W. 


■ Kr •' 


'N, 






fit 


i 







Colleen and Sandra Sortor 
with their Christmas dolls. 



(Colleen) "We were always poor but never really knew it. 
Mama made sure we had what we needed, especially a good 
Christmas. I remember one year when Ricky was just little, 
Aunt Luella and Uncle Johnnie were staying with us and we saw 
a red convertible being driven by a Santa Claus. He parked 
across the street and Aunt Luella ran out and waved him down 
and brought him over to our house. When Santa asked Ricky 
what he wanted for Christmas, Ricky said, 'a cracker!' Santa 
was so confused. What Ricky meant was a tractor but he was 
unable to say it right. 

"I think that was the year we got the walking dolls shown in the 
picture of us. They were really fun and nearly as big as we 
were. I still have mine. 

"One time, Mama gave Sandra and me oranges and sent us out 
to play. Some of the policemen were at our house to see Dad 
and their cars were parked outside. We decided to do them all 
a favor and washed their cars with our oranges. What a mess. 
When they came out, they all laughed and thought it was funny. 



•l()X 



Sandra Lee Sortor and David Tarbet 




Beverly, Judy, Wanda, Sandra, and 

Colleen at Judy's home. 

Circa 1998. 



"Mom was pretty embarrassed about the whole thing but we 
didn't get into trouble. 

"When we were little, Sandra, Ricky, and I were really 
mischievous, but we had a lot of fun together. I remember one 
incident when Sandra was five and I was about three, Marlene 
took us with her to get a permanent. Why she took two little 
girls to anyone's home while she had her hair done is beyond 
me. We were playing keep-away with Marlene's keys and the 
game got a little out of control and we broke one of the lady's 
lamps. Marlene was really mad at us and sent us out to sit in the 
car until she was finished. 

"When we got out to the car, it was locked! Sandra said, since 
she was in school and knew things, she could find the way 
home, so we took off down the street. When Marlene was 
finished, she came out and we weren't in the car. She hurried 
home and told Mom what had happened and she called Dad, 
who was a policeman. When he found us, he put us in the car 
and told us we had to tell Mom he spanked us. We walked into 
the house crying just like he said, and Mom got really mad at 
him for spanking us. 

"I especially remember the camping trips we took. We often 
went to the Teton Basin and camped out with Uncle Johnnie. 
The adults would make a bed of weeds and put blankets over 
them to create beds for us. 

"They all used to say Colleen, Ricky, and I should never be left 
alone together because we get into too much trouble. They still 
say that." 



Conversation. 
(Tarbet, Sandra S., 2006) 



(Sandra) "Mama had a very strong testimony of The Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She made sure each of us was 
blessed soon after we were born and baptized as soon as we 
turned eight years old. She continued to enforce this with each 
of the grandchildren." 



409 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



On August 1, 1959, Sandra was baptized a member of The 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 



Conversation. 
(Tarbet, Sandra S., 2006) 




Sandra, Ricky, and Colleen. 
Circa 1958. 



(Sandra) "Mama and Daddy were both really good cooks. Mom 
could whip up a wonderful meal out of practically nothing, and 
her lemon meringue pie was the best I ever ate. I always asked 
for lemon pie for my birthdays instead of cake. I wish I could 
cook like she did. And she was fanatic about keeping 
everything clean and orderly. I remember coming up the 
sidewalk on my way home from school and smelling hot bread, 
cookies, or some other wonderful aroma. It was either that or 
Clorox because she had spent the day cleaning house. 

"We used to sit out on the front porch in the evenings and 
Daddy would bring us root beer floats. He made those for us 
nearly every night. He also used to make pancakes (which we 
all called hotcakes) but he filled them with all sorts of things 
like chunks of cheese, or chopped up hot dogs, and whatever 
else looked good to him. Then he smothered them in maple 
syrup. I loved his hotcakes but a lot of my friends thought they 
were horrible, and some of the family weren't too crazy about 
them either. 



"Uncle Johnnie spent every winter with us and we loved him so 
much. He usually came in November and stayed until Spring 
and entertained us all winter with stories of Teton Basin. He 
also sang for us and he had such a wonderful voice. Aunt Luella 
was there often as well, and sometimes they sang together. She 
was also lots of fun to be around. 

"Aunt Luella and Mom were both terrified of thunder and 
lightning and so are all of us kids. In fact, if there was a thunder 
storm, all the kids wound up in our parent's bed. And Aunt 
Luella would show up in her nightgown no matter what time of 
the night it was. She refused to stay home alone." 



no 



Sandra Lee Sortor and David Tarbet 



The family continued to live in Pocatello and Sandra attended 
school in that area, graduating from Highland High School in 
about 1969. She and Colleen graduated from cosmetology 
school. 

(Sandra) "Vicki Lou Bock (Wanda's daughter) is the most 
unselfish person I've ever met and she knew a guy she thought 
was perfect for me. She pestered me for a long time trying to 
talk me into going out on a blind date with him. I just could not 
agree to blind dating, but she finally caught me at a weak 
moment and I agreed. That's how I met my husband, Dave 
Tarbet." 

DAVID TARBET 

David Tarbet was born May 18, 1947, in Tremonton, Box Elder, 
Utah. His parents are Ray and Alice Tarbet. Dave's siblings 
include: Paula, Marie, John, and Dallin. Shortly after Dave was 
born, Ray moved the family to Downey, Idaho, and Dave spent 
his youth in that very small town. Ray worked construction for 
most of each year and was rarely at home and so he had little 
interaction with his children. Nor did he provide much toward 
their support. Alice worked seven days each week in the local 
restaurant in order to feed and clothe her family. She also 
insisted they attend church on Sundays and stay in school. 

Dave and each of his siblings were baptized members of The 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints when they turned 
eight years old. 

In 1964, when Dave was 17 years of age, he joined the U.S. 
Navy and spent four years fighting in Vietnam. When he was 
discharged, he returned to Idaho. In the meantime, his family 
had moved to Soda Springs, Idaho. In 1968, Dave got a job 
with the J.R. Simplot Company, where he still works. 



411 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Conversation. 
(Tarbet, Sandra S., 2006) 



Stephanie Tarbet 
born July 13, 1977. 



John Tarbet 
born August 30, 1982. 



SANDRA LEE SORTOR AND DAVID TARBET 

Sandra Lee Sortor married David Tarbet at Pocatello, Bannock, 
Idaho. 

(Sandra) "I cried for a year after I was married. Not because I 
was unhappy with Dave but because he moved me to Soda 
Springs. I wanted to live in Pocatello, and I missed home. 
Daddy talked to me about this and told me how lucky I was to 
be able to raise my children in such a wonderful small town. 
Eventually, I fell in love with Soda and I wouldn't move away 
from here now for anything. I still miss home and my parents. 
I get homesick every time we talk about Mom and Daddy and 
when we were kids." 

Sandra and Dave are the parents of two children: Stephanie, 
born July 13, 1977; and John, born August 30, 1982. 



My Sister, Sandra. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2005) 



(Marlene) "When John was about nine years old, Stephanie 
joined the Soda Springs drill team. The entire family became 
involved in the hectic summer activities, which included drill 
practice, costume fittings, time lines and going from town to 
town to perform. I was present at one parade and we watched 
with pride as Stephanie marched past. However, John was 
watching her intently and continued to watch until she was out 
of sight. We all thought, 'What a good little brother he is. He 
is so proud of his sister! ' About that time, John turned to his 
mother (Sandra) and said, 'Mom, we used to be rich didn 't we, 
before Sis turned into a teenager? ' We laughed and laughed but 
he was dead serious." 



Howard Leslie Sortor 
died November 17, 1997. 

Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
died September 10, 1998. 



Sandra and her sisters helped their dad care for their mother, 
Ruby, following a massive stroke she suffered in about 1992. 
Sandra's father passed away on November 17, 1997, and Ruby 
eventually moved into Colleen's home. The brothers and sisters 
living in the Pocatello area continued to care for their mom until 
she passed away on September 10, 1998. 



412 



Sandra Lee Sortor and David Tarbet 



Dave and Sandra live in Soda Springs, Idaho, where Dave works 
for Simplot and is looking forward to retiring. Sandra and 
Stephanie work together at Sandra's pre-school, which is just 
across the street from her home. 

On June 13, 1998, Stephanie Tarbet married Travis Kator at 
the Greystone Manor in Soda Springs, Idaho. Travis was born 
March 1, 1975. He owns and operates an engineering design 
company. On July 13, 2003, Stephanie received a wonderful 
birthday gift when she gave birth to John Michael Kator. 



My Sister, Sandra. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2005) 




Stephanie Tarbet, age 5 years, 

and John Tarbet, age 5 months. 

Circa 1983. 



(Marlene) "When we were in Pocatello this summer, I had to 
pinch myself to be sure I wasn't the Queen at Buckingham 
Palace. We stayed with Stephanie and Travis and every night 
my bath was drawn, candles were lit providing a soft glow, a 
cassette player provided quiet music, and a thick terry bathrobe 
was waiting for me. Each night Stephanie provided a different 
fragrance of bubble bath for me. I really had the royal 
treatment." 

On July 10, 2004, John Tarbet married Tiffani Staley in an 
outdoor ceremony at her parent's home in Grace, Idaho. Tiffani 
was born September 13, 1984. John graduated from Idaho State 
University where he studied welding. He is employed at 
Premier Tech in Pocatello. Tiffani is in her second year at Idaho 
State University in the radiology program. She is on the Dean's 
list. John and Tiffani have a Saint Bernard puppy named Max, 
and live in a home in Pocatello, which they have renovated. 



413 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Travis Kator, Stephanie Tarbet 
Kator, and John Michael Kator. 
Circa December 2004. Courtesy 
Sandra Sortor Tarbet. 



John Tarbet and his wife, 
Tiffani Staley Tarbet, were 
married July 4, 2004. Circa 
2004. Courtesy Sandra Sortor 
Tarbet. 



414 



Chapter 23 
LUELLA COLLEEN SORTOR 

AND 
MICHAEL VANLEUVEN 




The VanLeuven family: Katie, Colleen Sortor, Michael, 
and Emily VanLeuven (in front). Circa 1988. 



Information for this chapter provided by 

Luella Colleen Sortor VanLeuven 

and several of her sisters. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Ruby Nada Madsen 

Born: 4 April 1915, Cache, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 1 Sep 1 998, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 


u 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 17 Nov 1997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Luella Colleen Sortor 

Born: 23 Aug 1953, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Michael VanLeuven 

Born: 1 1 Jun 1955, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Brandy VanLeuven 

Born: 6 Apr 1979, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: 6 Apr 1979, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Katie VanLeuven 

Born: 29 Jan 1982, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Emily VanLeuven 

Born: 28 Jul 1986, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Luella Colleen Sortor and Michael VanLeuven 



LUELLA COLLEEN SORTOR 



1953 



Luella Colleen Sortor 
born August 23, 1953. 



Richard Leslie Sortor 
born July25, 1955. 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2005b) 



Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005a) 




Luella Colleen Sortor. April 1955. 



Luella Colleen Sortor was born August 23, 1953, in Pocatello, 
Bannock County, Idaho. She is the seventh daughter born to 
Howard Leslie and Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor. Her older 
brothers and sisters include: Howard Delmer, LaVerl Dean, 
Dale George, Erma Marlene, Wanda Lou, Beverly Joyce, Ruby 
Darlene (who died at birth), Judy Jean, and Sandra Lee. When 
Colleen was 23 months old, her youngest brother, Richard 
Leslie, was born. 

(Connie) "I remember when Colleen was born, we went to visit. 
I was probably about 12 years old. She was one of the most 
beautiful babies I've ever seen and she has the most gorgeous 
red hair. Thick and curly." 

Colleen's father obtained a job with the Alameda Police 
Department where he worked for several years. In 1955, he was 
appointed to head both the police and fire departments in 
Alameda. He held these two positions until the town of 
Alameda was annexed into the city of Pocatello. 

(Wanda) "I remember one Christmas when Sandra was four and 
Colleen was two years old, the Montgomery Ward Store had a 
Santa Claus and Mom took the little girls to get their picture 
taken with Santa. I went along and was holding Colleen's hand. 
When she saw Santa Claus, she called him a 'wicked man' and 
took off through the mall. I really had to hurry to catch her. We 
have a really cute picture of Sandra and me with Santa, but none 
with Colleen." 



Conversation. 
(VanLeuven, Colleen S., 2006) 



(Colleen) "Another time, Mama gave Sandra and me oranges 
and sent us out to play. Some of the policemen were at our 
house to see Dad and their cars were parked outside. We 
decided to do them all a favor and washed their cars with our 
oranges. 



417 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Sandra and Colleen Sortor. 
Circa 1954. 




Jimmy Trout, Ronnie Trout, Colleen 
Sortor, and Sandra Sortor. 



"What a mess. When they came out, they all laughed and 
thought it was funny. Mom was pretty embarrassed about the 
whole thing but we didn't get into trouble. 

"When we were little, Sandra, Ricky, and I were really 
mischievous, but we had a lot of fun together. I remember one 
incident when Sandra was five and I was about three, Marlene 
took us with her to get a permanent. Why she took two little 
girls to anyone's home while she had her hair done is beyond 
me. We were playing keep-away with Marlene's keys and the 
game got a little out of control and we broke one of the lady's 
lamps. Marlene was really mad at us and sent us out to sit in the 
car until she was finished. 

"When we got out to the car, it was locked! Sandra said, since 
she was in school and knew things, she could find the way 
home, so we took off down the street. When Marlene was 
finished, she came out and we weren't in the car. She hurried 
home and told Mom what had happened and she called Dad, 
who was a policeman. When he found us, he put us in the car 
and told us we had to tell Mom he spanked us. We walked into 
the house crying just like he said, and Mom got really mad at 
him for spanking us. 



"Sandra and I loved when Aunt Luella's grandsons came to 
visit. Jimmy and Ronnie were Melvin Trout's boys and we 
always had a lot of fun together. 

"I especially remember the camping trips we took. We often 
went to the Teton Basin and camped out with Uncle Johnnie. 
The adults would make a bed of weeds and put blankets over 
them to create beds for us. 

"They all used to say Sandra, Rick, and I should never be left 
alone together because we got into too much trouble. They still 
say that." 



•1IX 



Luella Colleen Sortor and Michael VanLeuven 



On November 4, 1961, when Colleen was eight years old, she 
was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints. 



Conversation. 
(VanLeuven, Colleen, S., 2006) 



(Colleen) "The year that I was eight, Mom had no money to buy 
anything for us, so Uncle Johnnie bought our Christmas that 
year. I didn't know this until many years later. What a 
sweetheart he always was. 

"Christmas was a really fun time for us especially with Aunt 
Luella around. When we went shopping, she would sing carols 
as we walked up and down the streets. Everyone gave her funny 
looks but it didn't bother her one bit. Life was always lots more 
fun when Aunt Luella and Uncle Johnnie were around." 



Colleen attended schools in Pocatello and graduated from 
Highland High School. Following high school, Colleen attended 
cosmetology school but decided not to go any further with that 
occupation. She later got a job at Lamb Weston, a potato 
processing plant, and it was here she met her future husband, 
Michael VanLeuven. 

MICHAEL VANLEUVEN 

Michael VanLeuven was born June 11, 1950, in Pocatello, 
Bannock, Idaho. His mother was Arvella Howe and his father 
was a VanLeuven. 



Conversation. 
(Tarbet, Sandra S., 2006) 



(Sandra) "Mike was born about three months premature and was 
very tiny when he was born. He weighed only about two pounds 
and his mother really worked to save his life. It wasn't long 
after he was born that his parents were divorced. 



"Mike is very talented with computers, wood working, and many 
other things. When he was little, he took everything apart to see 
how it worked. According to family stories, they had to hide a 
lot of things (some of the small appliances and such) to keep 



419 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



them in one piece. Mike was too young to be able to put them 
all back together again." 

Arvella later married Bill Newhart, who raised Michael as his 
own. Michael loved Bill and never really knew his father. Mike 
has one sister and five brothers: Joann, Fred, Carl, Dirk, Gene, 
and Eddie. His parents were members of The Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints and, when Mike turned eight years 
old, he was baptized a member. 

He was raised in Pocatello, Idaho, and graduated from Pocatello 
High School. Following his graduation from high school, he 
worked for Lamb Weston, where he met Luella Colleen Sortor. 

LUELLA COLLEEN SORTOR AND MICHAEL 
VANLEUVEN 



Conversation. 
(Bock, Wanda S., 2005a) 



On November 4, 1976, Colleen and Michael VanLeuven were 
married at Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho. They are the parents of 
three daughters: Brandy, born April 6, 1979; Katie, born 
January 29, 1982; and Emily, born July 28, 1986. 



My Sister, Colleen. 
(Anderson, Marlene S., 2005) 



(Marlene) "The most tragic thing in Colleen and Mike's lives 
was the death of their baby girl, Brandy. She was a beautiful 
baby who lived only 29 minutes. She was a much wanted baby 
and Mike and Colleen were devastated. 



"Katie and Emily both have the most gorgeous hair. Katie's is 
red and Emily's is brown. One day while Katie was in grade 
school, a lady drove past her and ran right into a tree. When 
questioned by the police, she explained her attention was caught 
by a little girl with the most beautiful red hair: Katie! She had 
copper-colored red hair that hung way below her waist. She still 
has beautiful hair. Katie is a very talented girl and can draw 
free-hand pictures without relying on a picture. 



420 



Luella Colleen Sortor and Michael VanLeuven 



"Emily is a sophomore at Idaho State University where she is 
enrolled in the pharmacy program. Emily also is a beautiful 
young woman with the same talent for drawing as her sister. 
Emily's hair is thick, brown, and wavy, and whenever I see her, 
I can't resist touching that beautiful hair." 

Mike drives truck for Knight's Refrigeration and Colleen 
operates a day care in her home in Pocatello. She cares for 
about a dozen children ranging in age from very young to 
12 years of age. Katie works with her mom at the day care 
center. 

Colleen has always loved dogs and has had many different kinds 
throughout the years. At this time, Colleen has Ruby's little 
white poodle, Missy. 



Howard Leslie Sortor 
died November 17, 1997. 



Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor 
died September 10, 1998. 



Colleen and her sisters helped their father take care for their 
mother, Ruby, following a massive stroke she suffered in about 
1992. Colleen's father cared for Ruby until he passed away on 
November 17, 1997. 

Following her father's death, Colleen moved her mother into 
her home in Pocatello. Here, with the help of her brothers, 
sisters, and sisters-in-law, she continued to care for their mom 
until she passed away on September 10, 1998. 



Brandy VanLeuven was born on April 6, 1979. She lived only 
29 minutes. 



421 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Emily VanLeuven was born July 28, 1986. 
She is a sophomore at Idaho State 
University where she is enrolled in the 
pharmacy program. Emily also is a 
beautiful young woman with the same talent 
for drawing as her sister. Emily's hair is 
thick, brown, and wavy. 




Katie VanLeuven (right) 
January 29, 1982. She and Colleen work 
together running an in-home day care. Katie 
is a very talented girl and can draw free-hand 
pictures without relying on a picture. 



422 



Chapter 24 

RICHARD LESLIE SORTOR, 

PAMELA KAY DEEG, AND 

TIARE MAHER FERGUSON 




Richard 

Leslie and 

Tiare Sortor. 

Christmas 

2005. 



Information 

for this 

chapter 

provided 

Richard and 

Tiare Sortor. 

Edited by 

Merry Foster 

Shaw. 



Ruby Nada Madsen 

Born: 4 April 1915, Cache, Madison, Idaho 
Died: 10 Sep 1998, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Married: Howard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 5 May 1905, Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 
Died: 1 7 Nov 1 997, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



Richard Leslie Sortor 

Born: 25 Jul 1955, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married: Pamela Kay Deeg 

Born: 7 Dec 1955, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Amanda Deeg Sortor 

Born: 24 Jan 1976, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Ricky Sortor 

Born: 3 Feb 1978, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Troy Sortor 

Born: 21 April 1979, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Married Tiare Maher Ferguson 

Bom: 31 Oct 1960, Sacramento, Sacramento, California 
Died: Living 



Lance Ferguson Sortor 

Born: 24 Jan 1984, Boise, Ada, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Richard Leslie Sortor, Pamela Kay Deeg, and Tiare Maher Ferguson 



RICHARD LESLIE SORTOR 



1955 



Richard Leslie Sortor 
born July 25, 1955. 




Rick and Howard Sortor. 

Conversation. 
(VanLeuvan, Colleen S., 2006) 




Rick and Ruby Sortor. July 1956. 



Richard Leslie (Rick) Sortor was born July 25, 1955, at 
Pocatello, Bannock County, Idaho. His parents were Howard 
Leslie and Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor. He has three brothers: 
Howard Delmer, LaVerl Dean, and Dale George. Rick also has 
seven sisters: Erma Marlene, Wanda Lou, Beverly Joyce, Ruby 
Darlene (who died at birth), Judy Jean, Sandra Lee, and Luella 
Colleen. 

When Rick was born, his family was living in Pocatello, Idaho, 
where his father was chief of both the fire and police 
departments for the city of Alameda. At that time, Ruby was a 
stay-at-home mom. 

(Colleen) "When Rick was little, he played a lot with Beverly's 
little girl, Darla Rae. She was about six months older than Rick. 
One Sunday, when Rick was about three, Mom decided not to 
go to church for some reason and told Rick they were staying 
home. He must not have liked the idea. He got his little play 
rifle and he and Darla took off. It wasn't long before the family 
missed the two little ones and began searching. There was an 
open trench not far from our house and Mom was really scared 
for those two. When they finally caught up with Rick and 
Darla, they were heading up the steps into the church house. 

"We were always poor but never really knew it. Mama made 
sure we had what we needed, especially a good Christmas. I 
remember one year when Rick was just little, Aunt Luella and 
Uncle Johnnie were staying with us and we saw a red 
convertible being driven by a Santa Claus. He parked across the 
street and Aunt Luella ran out and waved him down and brought 
him over to our house. When Santa asked Rick what he wanted 
for Christmas, Rick said, 'a cracker!' Santa was so confused. 
What Rick meant was a tractor but he was unable to say it 
right." 



425 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Conversation. 
(Tarbet. Sandra S., 2006) 



(Sandra) "Mama had a very strong testimony of The Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She made sure each of us was 
blessed soon after we were born and baptized as soon as we 
turned eight years old. She continued to enforce this with each 
of the grandchildren." 



Conversation. 
(Sortor, Richard L., 2006) 



(Rick) "I had a really great childhood. Probably my best 
memories are centered around Christmas. It wasn't that we had 
a lot of presents, but as far back as I can remember, Uncle 
Johnnie was always there and so was Aunt Luella. They just 
made it all so much fun. 




Ricky Sortor as a Cub Scout. 
Circa 1963. 



"I remember Aunt Luella so well. During the war in Vietnam, 
she watched the news every day and was so worried because 
one of her boys was over there. She got a letter from him and he 
said one of his problems was he didn't have any soap. I 
remember hearing this and thinking maybe I could help. I didn't 
bother to tell my parents or anyone my plan. I was a Cub Scout 
at the time, I so I got my buddies together and we walked all 
around the neighborhood asking people for bars of soap. By the 
time we were finished we had several huge boxes full of soap, 
probably three or four hundred bars. Aunt Luella was so 
pleased and she packaged up all that soap and sent it over to her 
son. 



"I knew most of my mom's sisters, some better than others. I 
used to go visit Aunt Lavina at her home in Blackfoot, and I saw 
Aunt Amy once in a while. A few times I went to see her on 
Memorial Day and we spent the day decorating graves. I also 
saw Aunt Stella sometimes because I loved to fish the Teton 
River in the Basin. 

"I wish I'd spent more time with Uncle Johnnie and learned 
some of the stuff he knew. After he moved into his trailer, he 
built a little barn close to it. One day Dad and I went to visit 
him. He and Dad were always good friends. Johnnie took us 
out to the barn to show us the saddle he had built for his horse, 



426 



Richard Leslie Sortor, Pamela Kay Deeg, and Tiare Maher Ferguson 

Trinket. It was made from black leather and had silver conches 
on it. Remarkable workmanship. Dad said, 'You ought to leave 
that saddle to me in your will. ' Uncle Johnnie said, 'You '11 be 
dead long before I will so don 't worry about it. ' 





Ricky at about nine months old. 



"After Uncle Johnnie died, a lot of people ransacked his things 
and that would have really upset him. He wouldn't have wanted 
just anyone to have that saddle. Dad told me the saddle was still 
in the barn when there was a thunder and lightning storm and 
the barn was hit by lightning and it and the saddle burned to the 
ground. The barn really did burn down, but I don't know about 
the saddle. 

"Uncle Johnnie was an astonishing man. He had a barrel chest 
and powerful arm muscles. He had to have to pull himself up on 
a horse by his arms the way he did. Then he used one hand to 
sling his leg over the saddle and then reached down to place his 
feet in the stirrups. I can sometimes barely get on my horse and 
I have two good legs. He died when I was about 17. 

"The last time I was in Tetonia was about 1999. I drove out by 
Uncle Johnnie's property. The trailer was still there but was 
abandoned and had been badly vandalized. His old Studebaker 
was sitting there, too. I told myself I was going to go back for 
the car and restore it, but never did." 



Conversation. 
(Tarbet, Sandra S., 2006) 



(Sandra) "When Rick was 17 and not yet out of high school, a 
friend of his talked him into joining the Army. The recruiter 
promised the boys they could stay together throughout their tour 
of duty and have a fun adventure. They bought the whole sales 
pitch but Rick needed a parent's signature. One night he took 
Mom out to dinner and convinced her that was what he really 
wanted to do. It nearly broke her heart. She cried and cried, but 
signed his papers. She never liked having her children very far 
away from home. 



427 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



1 W^^B ^r 


■ /■J^l ' i* 





Rick joined the Army in 1973. 



"There were no major wars at the time Rick enlisted so he 
wasn't in combat. He and his friend were separated right away 
and never saw each other during their Army 'adventure.' Rick 
was sent to Germany and served most of his tour of duty there. 

"After Rick got out of the Army, he returned to Pocatello where 
he attended Idaho State University. He learned how to prepare 
bids for big construction jobs and was hired by the Ligget 
Company." 

Rick dated Pamela Kay Deeg, a friend from his high school 
days, and in late 1976, he asked her to marry him. 

PAMELA KAY DEEG 

Pamela Kay Deeg was born December 7, 1955, in Santa Rosa, 
California, to Albert and Phyllis Deeg. When she was two or 
three years old, her family moved to Pocatello and she attended 
schools there. She had known Rick Sortor at school and they 
both graduated from Highland High School. 

In December 1976, Rick's mother, Ruby Sortor, fell and broke 
her hip. She was walking home from her job at Lamb Weston, 
a potato processing plant. Rick and Pamela were engaged to be 
married, and Pam's bridal shower was scheduled for that night. 
Ruby was rushed to St. Anthony Community Hospital in 
Pocatello, where she underwent surgery. 

RICHARD LESLIE SORTOR AND PAMELA KAY DEEG 

Rick and Pam were married Friday, January 21, 1977, at the 
hospital in Pocatello, Idaho. 



Newspaper Article. 
(Pocatello Newspaper, 1977) 



"The mother of the bridegroom, Mrs. Howard Sortor, made it to 
the first ceremony, but not the second. Now a patient at 
St. Anthony Community Hospital, Mrs. Sortor, West Chubbuck 
Road, broke her hip last week and is recuperating from surgery. 



428 



Richard Leslie Sortor, Pamela Kay Deeg, and Tiare Maher Ferguson 




»khord Sortei. Mm. Howofd Sario' Mm Pom Sortor 



Richard Leslie Sortor and 

Pamela Kay Deeg with Ruby Sortor 

at the hospital in Pocatello. 



Wedding plans for her son, Richard, had been set for more than 
three weeks, and he and his fiance didn't want to postpone their 
nuptials. Yet they didn't want to go ahead with the ceremony 
without Richard's mother. 

"Pam's mother, Mrs. Albert Deeg, 661 Washington, suggested 
that the couple be married at the hospital where Mrs. Sortor 
could attend the ceremony. The bridegroom's father made all 
the arrangements with hospital officials for the ceremony. 

"The wedding was performed at 4:30 p.m. Friday in the second 
floor dining room at the hospital with members of the immediate 
families present. 

"Later that evening, the newlyweds repeated their vows at a 
more elaborate ceremony at The Terrace. Sixth District 
Magistrate Judge Robert Bennett presided at both ceremonies. 



Amanda Deeg born 
January 24, 1976. 

Ricky Sortor 
born February 3, 1978. 

Troy Sortor born 
April 21, 1979. 



"This is the third family wedding Mrs. Sortor has attended since 
August. Two of her daughters were married last year." 

Rick and Pam raised her young daughter, Amanda, who was 
born January 24, 1976, and later added two boys to the family: 
Ricky, born February 3, 1978; and Troy, born April 21, 1979. 

(Rick) "Mandy was almost two when we got married. I worked 
for J.R. Simplot for a while and then got a job with the railroad. 
When the boys were just little, I was laid off from the railroad. 
I was 24 years old with a wife and three kids. We left Idaho and 
went to Winnemucca, Nevada, where I worked for a while. 
Then I got a job working as a cowboy on the Leonard Creek 
Ranch. It's a huge spread located just east of the Black Rock 
and Pine Forest ranges northwest of Winnemucca. They ran 
4,000 head of breed stock plus all the calves, bulls, and horses. 



429 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Troy and Ricky, Halloween 
in Wyoming. 



"The ranch was 1 80 miles from the nearest town and the road in 
was mostly dirt. Pam went in every three months for supplies 
and took the kids with her. While they were in town, they 
shopped, went to the movies, and had ice cream. It was a pretty 
big deal. 

"Mandy attended the Leonard Creek School. It was one room 
with only nine kids. There was one teacher for Kindergarten 
through eighth grade. Once Rick was old enough, he attended 
Kindergarten at the same school. It was a great time for the kids 
and a wonderful place for them to be, but I was just an employee 
and the ranch would always belong to the boss. We decided to 
move on. Troy was four when we left the ranch. 

"From there we went to Utah and I started working construction. 
That took me to six different states. I worked for a time for 
Centralia Mining and that job took us to Washington. 

"We lived in Farson, Wyoming, for about five years. I 
continued to work construction and also owned a feed store. We 
lived in a really rustic cabin while we were there. I eventually 
wound up working for the S.C. Anderson Company in Boise, 
Idaho. 

"Pam and I were married for 16 years. She was a good mother 
to the three kids, but we divorced in 1992, when Ricky was 15 
and Troy was 14. 

"S.C. Anderson sent me to Salt Lake City to attend a self- 
improvement course called ROPES. That changed my life a 
little." 

TIARE MAHER FERGUSON 



Conversation. 
(Sortor, Tiare M, 2006) 



(Tiare) "I was born October 31, 1960, in Sacramento, 
California. My parents were Leonard and Grace Maher. 
Shortly after I was born, my parents moved us to Kuna, Ada 
County, Idaho, a small farming community southwest of Boise. 



430 



Richard Leslie Sortor, Pamela Kay Deeg, and Tiare Maher Ferguson 

I had only one sister. My parents met in Hawaii. My dad was 
stationed there for a time and my mom was raised on Oahu. She 
was only 10 or 12 years old when the Japanese bombed Pearl 
Harbor and she and her brothers had stark memories of that 
day." 



Conversation. 
(Sortor, Rick L., 2006) 



(Rick) "When Tiare was a little girl, she was sent to Hawaii 
every summer to spend time with her Grandmother. She would 
have loved it except her grandmother was a history buff and 
took the girls to all the museums. She explained all about Pearl 
Harbor and all the rest of the history. Tiare wanted to go play 
in the sand on the beach. To this day, she is just not interested 
in returning to Hawaii. I'd love to go see the islands and maybe 
I'll talk her into it." 



Conversation. 
(Sortor, Tiare M., 2006) 

Lance Ferguson 
born January 24, 1984. 



(Tiare) "After high school, I married and had a son, Lance, who 
was born January 24, 1984. We were later divorced and I 
worked to support myself and my young son. In 1993, we were 
living in Boise, Idaho, and I was selling Mary Kaye Cosmetics. 
My supervisor suggested I take a self-improvement course 
called ROPES offered in Salt Lake City. So I signed up and 
went. 



"That's where I met Rick Sortor; he wound up on my team. 
There were two courses held indoors, but the third was in the 
Uinta Mountains and the snow was hip deep on me (I'm 5 feet 
4 inches tall). It was very cold and I was a little worried about 
him because he was bundled up in two or three goose-down 
coats and looked half dead. I was afraid he was going to have 
a heart attack or something. He was also wearing one of those 
funny looking hats with the brim curled up on both sides. He 
survived and we started dating. 



431 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



RICHARD LESLIE SORTOR AND TIARE MAHER 
FERGUSON 

Rick and Tiare Maher Ferguson were married October 16, 1993. 
Tiare's son, Lance, lived with Rick and Pam, and Rick's two 
boys stayed with their mom part of the time and with their dad 
part of the time until they were grown. 



Conversation. 
(Sortor, Tiare M., 2006) 



(Tiare) "We lived in Boise for a while after we were married, 
then Rick got a different job and eventually went to work for 
Inquipco in Las Vegas, Nevada. 




Mandy, Troy, and Ricky Sortor. 



"I've always loved horses and they've been a huge part of my 
life. I've done a lot of rodeo riding, mostly barrel racing, and I 
won Rodeo Queen several times (I have the crowns to prove it). 

"I continued with my barrel racing and was in many rodeos in 
Nevada. But then I was in a really bad accident with many 
broken bones and had to give that up." 

(Rick) "We moved to Bakersfield, California, about nine years 
ago and this is the longest I've ever lived in one place since I 
got out of the Army. I'm now head of Business Development 
Management for the S.C. Anderson Company. We manufacture 
noise control blankets or panels, which are used to shield oil 
drilling pumps to control the noise. Lately we've branched out 
a little and created some for use in large hotel conference rooms 
to separate groups and keep sound contained." 



Conversation. 
(Sortor, Rick L., 2006) 



Conversation. 
(VanLeuvan. Colleen S., 2006) 



Conversation 
(Tarbet, Sandra S., 2006) 



(Colleen) "Rick has horses and loves to ride, especially in the 
rodeos and such. He is head of the posse at every parade event 
in Bakersfield." 

(Sandra) "Rick always wanted to be a cowboy and now he gets 
to do that at every rodeo and parade. He loves horses. His 
dream is to retire in Soda Springs and work with his horses." 



432 



Richard Leslie Sortor, Pamela Kay Deeg, and Tiare Maher Ferguson 



Conversation. 
(Sortor, Tiare M, 2006) 




(Tiare) "When I'm not riding, I work as a mortgage loan officer 
at a local bank. But Rick and I share a love of horses and riding 
and that has made our years together really fun. We own 
several horses including a Paint and we belong to the American 
Paint Horse Association. My coach showed him last year at the 
Paint Breed Show in the Junior Division and they won State in 
team roping. I've shown him in the Amateur Division and taken 
State, also. I won a silver buckle and then I bought Rick one 
just like it. He wears his a lot. We are very competitive so 
maybe it's a good thing he helps me get to the shows instead of 
showing his own. It would be a major competition. 

"Rick has been a member of the Kern County Sheriff's Posse 
since we moved to Bakersfield. Each member is legally 
deputized and is allowed to carry a gun. They ride in all the 
parades and participate in the rodeos. The most important thing 
they do, however, is sponsor a Team Roping Jackpot to raise 
money for abused, handicapped, and under-privileged children. 
They use some of the money raised to take these kids to a 
summer camp where they get a chance to be around horses and 
do some riding. 



Rick Sortor at a rodeo in 
Bakersfield, California. 



"Rick has been head of the posse for some time and really 
struggles with the new, young members who think new and 
innovative is more important than traditional and the 'old ways.' 
Rick is a defender of the old standard way of doing things and 
doesn't like change. 



"Rick is still very mischievous and his favorite subject for his 
teasing is me. He was probably the class clown when he was in 
school. He is also very caring and thoughtful." 

Richard Leslie Sortor has four children and five granddaughters: 

Amanda Deeg was born January 24, 1976. She graduated from 
high school in Boise, Idaho. She has one daughter, Courtney. 



433 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Ricky Sortor was born February 3, 1978, in Pocatello, Idaho. 
He is married to Raquel and they have one son: Joseph; and 
two daughters: Kennedy and Ashlynn. 

Troy Sortor was born April 21, 1979, in Pocatello, Idaho. He 
has two daughters: Justice and Liberty. 

Lance Ferguson was born January 24, 1984, in Kuna, Idaho. 
He attended school to learn the art of horseshoing and then 
applied to the academy to become a Kern County Sheriff. 
Lance ranked fourth highest on his written exam and is first on 
the list to be admitted to the academy. He is single and lives in 
Bakersfield, California. 



■HI 



Richard Leslie Sortor, Pamela Kay Deeg, and Tiare Maher Ferguson 




Richard Leslie 
Sortor (above left) 
in first grade. 
Circa 1963. 






Rick (above center) preparing for Christmas dinner, 1993, and (above right) with his three sons: 
Troy (left), Ricky (right), and Lance (front). Rick and his oldest brother, Delmer, (below left, L to 
R) share a moment together. Photo (below right) shows Tiare leaving the hospital following her 
barrel racing accident. With her are Rick and Lance. Circa 1990s. All photos courtesy Rick Sortor. 





435 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




Ricky Sortor (above) played football in 
school while the family lived in Wyoming. 
Circa 1989. Rick is shown at right with his 
wife, Raquel, and two of their little children. 
Courtesy Rick Sortor. 




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Troy Sortor (above right) when he was 
seven years old; in third grade (above 
right) and in 1989, when he won the 
Wyoming State Wrestling Championship. 

All courtesy Rick Sortor. 




436 



Richard Leslie Sortor, Pamela Kay Deeg, and Tiare Maher Ferguson 




Lance Ferguson Sortor (above) completed a course in horseshoing. He is shown shoeing Rick's 
Palomino while his dad watches. 



**W 




Rick's daughter, Amanda, (above left) in a school photo. Amanda is 
shown (above center) with her daughter, Courtney, when the little girl 
was about one year old. Courtney is shown (far right) at about age five. 

All courtesy Rick Sortor. 




437 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 




In the photo above, Rick is riding his 
Palomino in a roping competition. The 
photo at right shows Tiare on her Paint, 
which won the California Junior Heading 
Championship in 2005. All courtesy 
Rick Sortor. 



438 



Chapter 25 
VELNA SYBLE MADSEN 

AND 
WILLIAM HOWARD CHINN 




Velna Syble Madsen Chinn 



Original information provided 

by Maxine Douglass Trout. 

Edited by Merry Foster Shaw. 



Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen 

Born: 10 May 1876, Gardner, Grundy, Illinois 
Died: 19 Jul 1943, Island Park Reservoir, Fremont, 
Idaho 



Married: Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm Madsen 

Born: 20 Feb 1864, Lystrup, Uvelse, 

Fredericksborg, Denmark 
Died: 7 Mar 1932, Cache, Teton, Idaho 



Velna Syble (Sybil) Madsen 

Born: 5 Apr 1917, Cache, Teton, Idaho 

Died: 1 3 Aug 1 939, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 



Married: William Howard Chinn 

Born: 13 May 1914, New Harmony, Washington, Utah 
Died: 6 Jul 1 962, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 



Mary Shirlene Chinn 

Born: 1 1 May 1937, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Died: Living 



Velna Syble Madsen and William Howard Chinn 



VELNA SYBLE MADSEN 



1917 



'The Madsen Family." 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 

Velna Syble Madsen born 
April 5, 1917. 



Cache Ward Records. 
(LDS Church, Undated) 



(Maxine) "Velna Syble (or Sybil) Madsen was the youngest of 
10 children born to Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm (Bill) and 
Anna Mary Hansen Madsen. She was born on April 5, 1917, in 
Cache, Teton County, Idaho. When she was born, her father 
wanted to name her Dorothy but, because he had trouble 
pronouncing the name, she was called Velna." 

Velna was given a blessing in The Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints by M. Mickelsen on September 2, 1917. 



"The Madsen Family." 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



(Maxine) "Velna was a very pleasant, fun-loving person. In her 
youth she attended school in Cache. One of her playmates was 
Lois Loosli. Lois would come from her home to play and 
Velna's father, Bill, would send her home. One day, Lois said 
to Velna, "I just got here and I'm not going homer So the two 
of them went on the south side of the house and played. Bill 
was very hard of hearing and couldn't hear them playing. 




"Velna slept upstairs with her sisters when they were staying at 
the house in Tetonia. The stairs were very narrow and steep. 
One day, she was coming downstairs and stepped in a bucket of 
hot ashes that had been left sitting on the stairs. She fell all the 
way to the bottom. She was probably not badly injured but she 
left cracks in the fourth and second stairs from the bottom. 
Those cracks are still there. 

"Velna loved to play with paper dolls cut from the old catalogs. 
She also enjoyed riding stick horses to and from the pasture in 
the summer to drive the cows. She would pretend some of the 
fence posts along the way were different boy friends. She 
always used her imagination. Velna also created a pretend 
playhouse and one day she made a telephone from a fruit jar 
ring, string, and a nail for her playhouse." 



Velna Syble Madsen 
as a teenager. 



441 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Conversations. 
(Freeman. Joy F., Undated) 



(Joy) "When I was in the third grade, we spent a week or two 
visiting in Teton Basin and they let me go to school with Velna, 
who was just a couple of years older than I was. She was my 
favorite aunt, and we were very good friends." 



"The Madsen Family." 
(Trout/Piquet, 1992) 



Probably the one thing that got Velna into trouble the most was 
when she got into Ruby's makeup. Then you would hear Ruby 
say, "Ma, Velna 's been in my 'violet' againV 



Letter to Cassandra Bird. 
(Child, Amy M., 1991) 



Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm Madsen 
died March 7, 1932. 



(Amy) "My little sister, Velna, had blue eyes and long hair that 
she liked to color a pretty shade of red. She was slender and full 
of life. Velna had a beautiful alto voice and could sing like a 
lark. She loved to dance. She was so fun to be around." 

Velna and Ruby were the only children left at home when Bill 
and Mary moved to St. Anthony in about 1930. Here Mary ran 
a cafe and worked part time at the seed house. Velna's father 
passed away when she was just 15 years of age. 



When Velna was about 16 or 17, she, Ruby, and their mother 
moved to Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

WILLIAM HOWARD CHINN 



International Genealogical Index. 
(L.D.S. Church, Undated) 



William Howard Chinn was born May 13, 1914, in New 
Harmony, Washington County, Utah. His parents were William 
Easton and Olive Isabel Leavitt Chinn. He had a sister named 
Birdy who dated Velna Madsen's brother, Johnnie William, for 
a short time. 



VELNA SYBLE MADSEN AND HOWARD CHINN 



Velna Syhle Madsen and 

William Howard Chinn 

married April 5, 1936. 



Velna Syble Madsen probably met William Howard Chinn 
when she and her mother moved to Idaho Falls, Idaho. They 
were married on Velna's 19th birthday, April 5, 1936, in Idaho 
Falls, Idaho. 



442 



Mary Shirlene Chinn 
born May 11, 1937. 



Velna Syble Madsen and William Howard Chinn 



On May 1 1, 1937, Velna gave birth to a baby girl, whom they 
named Mary Shirlene (or Shirlynn). Sometime following the 
birth of her daughter, Velna and Howard were separated and 
Velna and her young daughter moved into the small home on 
College Street rented by her mother, Mary Madsen. 



Then in August 1939, Velna suffered a severe stomach ache. 
She was quite ill for several days and then seemed to improve. 
However, her condition again worsened and, on August 12, the 
doctor was called to examine her. He determined that her 
appendix had ruptured and she was suffering from severe 
peritonitis poisoning. There was nothing he could do for her. 
Several of Velna's sisters were present, including Amy and 
Ruby and, upon hearing the news about their baby sister, they 
all began weeping and wailing. 



Velna Syble Madsen Chinn 
died August 13, 1939. 



Mary Madsen was a much more stoic person and informed the 
girls they must get hold of themselves at once and be strong for 
their little sister. Velna suffered terrible pain and late the next 
day, on August 13, 1939, she passed away at her home. It was 
not known where Howard was living at that time, so Mary ran 
ads in newspapers around the country to try to notify him of his 
wife's death. He did not attend the funeral. 



Velna was taken to the Cache-Clawson Cemetery near Tetonia, 
Idaho, for burial. She rests near her parents. 



Diary of Mary Madsen. 
(Madsen, Mary H., 1941) 



Mary cared for her little granddaughter until Howard returned. 
At that time, she requested that she be allow her to raise the 
child, but he refused. Mary tried to gain custody through the 
courts but failed. Howard kept his young daughter. However, 
it appears from reading Mary's diary that she still saw Shirlene 
from time to time. On May 28, 1941, Madeline Chinn (probably 
Howard's sister or sister-in-law) brought Shirlene to visit her 
grandmother: ''''Madeline brought Shirlene over today. She sang 
five songs. She sure is cute. " 



443 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Johnnie William Madsen. 
(Gillies. Judy S., 2003) 



(Judy) "Uncle Johnnie, Aunt Luella, and Ruby had lengthy 
conversations about their youngest sister, Velna, who passed 
away at the young age of 22. They speculated about her 
daughter, Shirlene, who went to live with her father. The three 
remembered how Grandma Madsen wanted to keep this little 
girl in Idaho and raise her around family who loved Velna. 
They spent hours wondering how she might look, what she was 
like, and whether she was happy." 



Family Search, Ancestral File. 
(L.D.S. Church, Undated) 



On September 4, 1945, when Shirlene was eight years old, 
Howard married Barbara Bradeson in Salt Lake City, Utah. 
They later settled in California. 



Family Search, Ancestral File. 
(L.D.S. Church, Undated) 



Howard Chinn passed away on July 6, 1962, in Los Angeles, 
California, and is buried in Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, 
California. 



In later years, Shirlene married Edwin Fox Evensen and they 
lived in Washington and Concord, California. In approximately 
1970, Shirlene visited the Teton Basin and her Uncle Johnnie in 
particular. 



Conversation. 
(Douglass, Vernice, 1996) 



(Vernice) "Shirlene looked so much like Velna. She had the 
same long arms and could hardly decide what to do with them, 
just like her mother. " 



Conversation. 
(Martin, Connie H., 2003) 



(Connie) "My mom (Amy) mentioned that Shirlene came for a 
brief visit in 1972, after Uncle Johnnie passed away. Shirlene 
inherited her mother's share from the sale of the Madsen land. 
Mom said she was in and out like a darning needle." 



Ill 



Velna Syble Madsen and William Howard Chinn 




Velna Syble Madsen and William 

Howard Chinn. Circa late 1930s. 

Courtesy Bonnie Rae Hansen. 




445 



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447 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



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449 



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Vernice Douglass, Merlyn Rich Powell, Virgil E. (Bud) Powell, and Merry F. Shaw. July 2005. 

. 2003. Conversation at the Douglass home in Teton Basin with Merlyn Rich Powell, 

Virgil E. (Bud) Powell, and Merry F. Shaw. July 2003. 

Douglass, James Vernice. 2003. Conversation at the Douglass home in Teton Basin with Merlyn Rich 
Powell, Virgil E. (Bud) Powell, Dorothy Choules Douglass, and Merry F. Shaw. July 2003. 

Douglass, Vernice Orrin. 1996. Conversation at the Douglass home in Teton Basin among Shana F. 
Montgomery, Merlyn Rich Powell, and Merry F. Shaw. August 1996. 

Farnsworth, Mary Heath. 1943. Writeup about her sister, Thelma May (The) Heath Standen, following 
the drowning of her sister and niece. Copy obtained from Merlyn R. Powell. 1943. 

Fife, Joy Jalene (Jodi) Foster. 1997. Telephone conversation with Merry F. Shaw. Summer 1997. 

. 2001-2005. Various conversations with Merry F. Shaw. 2001-2005. 

Foster, Charles (Chic) William. 1998. Letter to Merry F. Shaw. April 22, 1998. 

. 1991-1996. Autobiography of Charles William Foster. 1991-1996. 



451 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



1991 Interview conducted by Mary Margaret Montgomery Kaelin at Salt Lake City, 



Utah. Winter 1991. 

1981. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. St. Anthony, Idaho. Summer 1981. 



Foster, J Fern. 1998. Various conversations with Merry F. Shaw. 1998. 

Foster, James William. Undated. Taken from notes of his childhood in the possession of Merry F. 
Shaw. 

Foster, Terry Lavell. 2002. Conversations with Merry F. Shaw. 2002. 

. 2000. Conversations with Merry F. Shaw. August 27, 2000. 

. 1996. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. September 22, 1996. 

. 1994. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. Summer 1994. 

. 1993. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. May 29, 1993. 

Freeman, Lynn Henry. 1982-1983. Various conversations to relate his life story to Merry F. Shaw. 
1982-1983. 

Freeman, Margaret Joy Rathjens Foster. Undated. Various conversations with Merry F. Shaw. 
Undated. 

. 1976. Journal in possession of Merry F. Shaw. 



Fullmer, Erma Geneal Douglass. 2004. My Memories. Unpublished and undated. 

Garrett, Tressa Murdoch and Percy Blaine Hawkes. 1992. Homesteading and Pioneering in the Upland 
Area between Fall and Teton Rivers. History of the Uplands. Farnum, Drummond, Squirrell, 
Lamont and Communities Faded into the Past. 1896 - 1990. History of the Homesteading and 
Pioneering Histories of Families by Contribution and Special Permission of Articles from the 
"Snake River Echoes.'''' Second Printing March 1993. 

Gaisford, Michelle Montgomery. 2001. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. March 2, 2001. 



452 



Bibliography 

Gillies, Judy Jean Sortor. 2005. Judy Jean Sortor Gillies. A brief writeup of her life. October 2005. 

• 2004. Dale George Sortor. Celebration of Life, read as part of his funeral services. 



February 17,2004. 



• 2003-2004. Various telephone conversations with, and e-mail messages sent to, Merry 

F. Shaw. 

. 2003. "Johnnie William Madsen, Uncle Johnnie." Memories as told by Wanda Lou 

Sortor Bock and Beverly Joyce Sortor Henson to Judy Jean Sortor Gillies, and Judy's Memories. 

. 2003. Luella Viola Madsen Trout. Unpublished and undated. 



Golightly, Judith Lee Broadhead. 2005. Interview at her home by Merry F. Shaw. July 17, 2005. 

Grundy County Court. 1873. Marriage license number 03950(1) Grundy, for Andrew Boise Hansen 
and Anna Marie (Mary) Bersnip at Morris, Grundy County, Illinois. Dated March 25, 1873. 
Certified copy received from County Clerk and Recorder, Lana J. Phillips, December 19, 2003. 

Halberts. 1972. Coat of Arms for Saathoff family. Historiography. Copy received by Merry F. Shaw 
from Bobby Lee Saathoff on March 16, 1974. 

Henson, Beverly Joyce Sortor. 2005a. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. July 17,2005. 

. 2005b. Corrections and additions to her information. Fall 2005. 

Hinchman, Marian (Merry) Luella. 2002. Various conversations with Merry F. Shaw. 

Hoyer, Metha Peters. 2005. Memories from her childhood. Metha Peters Hoyer is the granddaughter 
of John Henry and Metha Johanna Saathoff Rathjens. June 2005. 

Idaho State Journal. 2005. "Back in Time." Article published on June 2, 2005. Page A2. 

. 2004. Obituary for Dale George Sortor printed in Idaho State Journal and on Internet at 



http//www.journalnet.com/articles/2004. 

Jarvis, Delores Rhoades. 1987. Obituary presented at the funeral of John Wesley Goodson. Delores 
is the daughter of Edna Goodson Rhoades and a niece to John Wesley Goodson. 1987. 

453 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Kaolin, Mary Margaret Montgomery. 2005a. Letter to Merry F. Shaw. September 26, 2005. 
. 2005b. Memories from her childhood. 2005. 

Madsen, Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen. 1941 . Excerpts from her personal diary in possession of Merry 
F.Shaw. Idaho Falls, Idaho. 1941. 

Martin, Richard and Connie LaRaine Hubbard. 2005a. Tape recorded conversation with Merry F. 
Shaw at the Martin home. July 22, 2005. 

Martin, Connie Rae Hubbard (Child). 2005b. Various telephone conversations and letters from Connie 
L. Martin to Merry F. Shaw. 2005. 

. 2005. Remembering Elvin Wesley Goodson. A brief story provided by Connie L. 



Martin. June 2005. 



2005. Memories of my sister, Jeanice (Jan). A brief story provided by Connie L. Martin. 



June 2005. 

. 2005. A Christmas Gift,. A brief story provided by Connie L. Martin. June 2005. 



. 2005. Remnants of H. Terry Child's 'Tapestry of Life.'. A brief story provided by 

Connie L. Martin. June 2005. 

. 2004. "Remnants From the Tapestry of the Life of Shirley Jean Hubbard (Child) Burris." 



Submitted with love by Connie L. Martin to Merry F. Shaw. June 2004. 

. 2004. "Richard B. Martin, Brief Life Sketch." Prepared by Connie L. Martin. Copy 



provided to Merry F. Shaw. January 27, 2004. 



2004. "Memories of My Sister Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) Hansen." Submitted with 



love by Connie L. Martin to Merry F. Shaw. June 2004. 

_. 2003a. Articles and e-mail messages written by Connie L. Martin. Summer 2003. 
_. 2003b. Tape-recorded conversation with Merry F. Shaw and Merlyn Rich Powell. July 



2003. 
454 



Bibliography 

• 2002. "Life Sketch of Amy Pearl Madsen Child." Written for the funeral of her mother, 

Amy Pearl Madsen Child. July 2002. 

Minnesota, State of. 1933. Death certificate for Anna Marie Bersnip Hansen. 

. 1938. Death certificate for Andrew Boise Hansen 

Montgomery, Shana D Foster. 2005. Letter to Merry F. Shaw containing funeral program for Hazel 
Mae Thorsted Broadhead. October 3, 2005. 

. 2003. Thank you card to Marge Powell Caron dated August 3, 2003. 

. 1998. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. Spring 1998. 



Nemaha County Court. 1881. Certified certificate of marriage record for John Henry Rathjens and 
Metha Johanna Saathoff issued at the Parsonage Benton Precinct, Brownsville, Nemaha County, 
Nebraska. Issued by Nemaha County Court, Auburn, Nebraska, August 2, 1976. In possession 
of Merry F. Shaw. 

Oklahoma, State of. 1941. "Standard Certificate of Death." Issued for Metha Saathoff Rathjens on 
October 1, 1941. Copy obtained from Vital Records Division, Oklahoma State Department of 
Health, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. In possession of Merry F. Shaw. 

1948. "Standard Certificate of Death." Issued for John Henry Rathjens on August 2, 



1948. Copy obtained from Vital Records Division, Oklahoma State Department of Health, 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. In possession of Merry F. Shaw. 

Owens, Inez May Foster. 1983. Conversation among Inez May Foster Owens, Terry Lavell Foster, 
Sharon Butts Foster, and Merry Foster Shaw. Summer 1983. 

. Various. Conversations with Merry F. Shaw during several visits to the Owens home in 



San Diego, California. 
Owens, Clifford K. 1999a. E-mail message to Merry F. Shaw. October 2, 1999. 

. 1999b. E-mail message to Merry F. Shaw. October 16, 1999. 

. 1994. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. August 20, 1994. 

455 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



1983. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. Summer 1983. 



Pickens, Heidi LaRaine Martin. 2005. "Thoughts on My Parents." Provided via e-mail to Merry F. 
Shaw. September 22, 2005. 

Piquet, Lena Ilene Douglass. 2004. "Lena Ilene Douglass Piquet, a brief life history." 2004. 

Philip, Liss. 1850-1934. The Hamburg Passenger Lists. The Genealogical Society of Utah, 1964, 
1975. Family History Library Call Number 943.5 15/H1 W3v. 486 microfilm reels. 

Pocatello Newspaper. 1977. Writeup of wedding of Richard Leslie Sortor and Pamela Kay Deeg. 
January 23, 1977. 

Porter, Darken Trout. 2003. Various conversations and e-mail messages. 

Post Register. 1943. News articles related to boating accident and subsequent funeral services printed 
in Post Register daily newspaper. Idaho Falls, Idaho. July 1943. 

. 1946. Obituary of William George Standen. Daily newspaper printed at Idaho Falls, 



Idaho. April 29, 1946. 

Powell, LeolaMerlyn Rich. 2005. "LeolaMerlyn Rich Powell." A short autobiography. Unpublished. 
2005. 

. 2002. "Anna Mary Hansen." Unpublished. 

• 1990. Letter to Merry F. Shaw and Joy Foster Freeman. February 20, 1990. 



1976. Notes from trip to Canby, Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota. August 1, 1976. 



Unpublished. 



Undated. "Bits and Pieces of Family History of Anna Mary Hansen and Andrew Boise 



Hansen." Unpublished. 
Powell, Virgil (Bud) Elwood. 2003-2005. Various conversations with Merry F. Shaw. 
• 2002. Life History. Unpublished. 

456 



Bibliography 

1997. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. August 1997. 

1996. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. Spring 1996. 
1995. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. February 23, 1995. 



Rechtenbach, Rebecca Anne. 2005. "Mere Words Just Cannot Describe How I Felt Within My Heart." 
A poem written to honor her grandmother, Hazel Mae Thorsted Broadhead. 2005. 

Richards, Val. 1982. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw. Rexburg, Idaho. November 2, 1982. 

Seeley, Sylvan. 1982. Talk given at LDS Church Sacrament Meeting at Rexburg Fifth Ward on Scout 
Sunday. Spring 1982. 

Shaw, Merry Foster. Undated. Memories of our childhood. Undated. 

Shaw, Michael Keith. 2000. Telephone conversation with Merry F. Shaw. 2000. 

Smith, Charles, Jr. 1982. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw at the Smith home at Rexburg, Idaho. 
Summer 1982. 

Sortor, Howard Delmer. 2005. Notes. Handwritten notes regarding Delmer's life and his children. 
November 2005. 

Sortor, Michael A. 1999. "Life Sketch of Jo Anna E. Marshall Sortor" Written by Jo Anna's 14-year 
old grandson and presented at her funeral. 1999. 

Sortor, Richard Leslie. 2006. Telephone conversation with Merry F. Shaw. February 14, 2006. 

Sortor, Ruby Nada Madsen. Undated. "Ruby Nada Madsen Sortor." Written by Ruby for grandson, 
Dan Sheldon Gillies. Undated and unpublished. 

Sortor, Tiare Maher Ferguson. 2006. Telephone conversation with Merry F. Shaw. February 13, 2006. 

. Undated. "A School Story." As told by Ruby to grandsons, Anthony Samuel and Robert 

Christian Gillies. Undated and unpublished. 

Tarbet, Sandra Lee Sortor. 2006. Telephone conversation with Merry F. Shaw. February 9, 2006. 

457 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Trout, Maxine Douglass and Ricky Piquet. 1992. "The Madsen Family." Research by Maxine 
Douglass Trout. Compiled by Ricky Piquet. Unpublished. 1992. 

Trout, Stella Maxine Douglass. 2004. "Stella Maxine (Douglass) Trout." A brief version of her 
personal history. October 2004. 

. 2002-2005. Various conversations and e-mail messages with Merry F. Shaw. 2002-2004. 



U.S. Federal Government. 1930. "Census for Texas." Internet at http//www.Ancestry.com. 

. 1900. "Census for Illinois." Internet at http//www. Ancestry. com. 

. 1900. "Census for Montana." Internet at http//www. Ancestry. com. 

. 1880. "Census for Illinois." Salt Lake City, Utah. Microfilm No. 254,209. 

. 1880. "Census for Missouri." Salt Lake City, Utah. Microfilm No. D39885, 48459, 



pt 460. 

VanLeuvan, Luella Colleen. 2006. Telephone conversation with Merry F. Shaw. February 4, 2006. 

Webster's College Dictionary. 2001. Random House, Inc., New York. 2001. 

Whyte, James Lee. 1 975. "Tribute to Lavina Madsen Whyte." Read at a Relief Society meeting in the 
Groveland Idaho Ward. 1975. 

Whyte, Lavina Marie Madsen Rathjens Powell. 1989-1990. Excerpts from five year diary kept by 
Lavina M. Whyte in possession of Merry F. Shaw. January 1989 to December 1990. 

. 1987. Letter to Merry F. Shaw dated Sunday, July 19, 1987. 

• 1986a. Letter to Merry F. Shaw dated Saturday, May 17, 1986. 

• 1986b. Letter to Merry F. Shaw dated Wednesday, July 2, 1986. 

. 1986c. Letter to Merry F. Shaw dated Tuesday, August 5, 1986. 

. 1986d. Letter to Merry F. Shaw dated Sunday, September 7, 1986. 

458 



Bibliography 

• 1985. Letter to Merry F. Shaw dated Sunday, October 6, 1985. 

• 1 984-1988. Excerpts from five year diary kept by Lavina Madsen Whyte in possession 

of Merry F. Shaw. January 1984 to December 1988. 

. 1 979- 1 983. Excerpts from five year diary kept by Lavina Madsen Whyte in possession 



of Merry F. Shaw. January 1979 to December 1983. 

. 1974-1978. Excerpts from five year diary kept by Lavina Madsen Whyte in possession 



of Merry F. Shaw. January 1974 to December 1978. 

. 1972-1973. Excerpts from diary kept by Lavina Madsen Whyte in possession of Merry 



F. Shaw. January 1972 to December 1973. 

. 1968-1972. Excerpts from five year diary kept by Lavina Madsen Whyte in possession 



of Merry F. Shaw. January 1968 to December 1972. 

. 1963-1967. Excerpts from five year diary kept by Lavina Madsen Whyte in possession 



of Merry F. Shaw. January 1963 to December 1967. 

. 1958-1961 . Excerpts from five year diary kept by Lavina Madsen Whyte in possession 



of Merry F. Shaw. January 1958 to December 1961. 

. 1953-1957. Excerpts from five year diary kept by Lavina Madsen Whyte in possession 



of Merry F. Shaw. January 1953 to December 1957. 

. 1947-1951. Excerpts from five year diary kept by Lavina M. Whyte in possession of 



Merry F. Shaw. January 1947 to December 1951. 

. Undated. Various interviews with Lavina Madsen Whyte at her home conducted by 



Merry F. Shaw to gather personal history. 

. Undated. "My Father." Unpublished. Copy in possession of Merry F. Shaw. 

. Undated. "My Mother." Unpublished. Copy in possession of Merry F. Shaw. 

. Undated. "Anna Mary Hansen Madsen." Unpublished. Copy in possession of Merry F. 

Shaw. 

459 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



Undated. "Life Story of Lavina Marie Madsen Whyte." Unpublished. 



Young, Cyrus. 1983. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw in the Young home at Twin Groves, Idaho. 
Summer 1983. 

Young, Vera. 1983. Conversation with Merry F. Shaw in the Young home at Twin Groves, Idaho. 
Summer 1983. 



■U,() 



INDEX— VOLUME II 



-A- 

Academy of Hair Design 233 

Accampo, Albert 157 

Accampo, Andrew 157 

Accampo, Beatrice 157 

Accampo, John 157 

Acosta, Yesika see Piquet, Yesika Acosta 

Afton, Wyoming 348, 355 

Agri-Business 59 

Agricultural College see Utah State University 

Agricultural Service Conservation 31 

Alameda, Bannock, Idaho 295-297, 324, 

400,407,417,425 

Alameda Fire Department 296 

Alameda Junior High School 387, 391, 392 

Alameda Police Department 295, 371, 400, 

402,407,417 
Alaska 295, 314, 323, 

370, 387, 397, 398, 407 

Alaska Basin 50 

Albertsons Store 73, 398 

Allen Seed Company (House) 282 

Alta, Idaho 26 

America see United States of America 

American Falls High School 369 

American Falls, Idaho 314, 322, 333, 

347,348,369,387,391,397 

American Legion 31 

American Legion Auxiliary 31 

American Paint Horse Association 433 

Ames, Mya Rayne 391 

Ammon, Idaho 72 

Ammon LDS Second Ward 72 

Anaconda, Deer Lodge, Montana 145, 146, 181, 

362, 372 
Anchorage, Alaska 295, 323, 324, 

370, 397, 407 

Anderson, Alice Donetta 314, 348, 351 

Anderson, Alice Elinora Tolman 348 

Anderson, Annetta Frandsen 348, 349 

Anderson, Brooklyn 356, 358, 360 

Anderson, Dallas 358, 360 

Anderson, Dayton 358, 360 



Anderson, Erma Marlene Sortor 34, 98, 104, 

106, 123, 125, 126, 130, 133, 162, 172, 197, 255, 278, 
285-287, 289-291, 293-297, 299, 300, 302, 311 312- 
314, 319, 321, 323, 324, 331-335, 341-348, 351-360, 
364-370, 372, 374, 380, 387, 388, 397, 401, 407, 412, 
413,417,425 

Anderson, Gladys 398 

Anderson, Hans Peter 348, 350 

Anderson, John 300, 342, 353, 

354, 358 

Anderson, Lamont C. (Bud) 104, 296, 300, 

314, 341, 342, 348-360, 370, 371, 374, 380 

Anderson, Lacey 358, 360 

Anderson, Lorri Fletcher 358 

Anderson, Orlando 348, 349, 351 

Anderson, Randy Lamont 300, 342, 352, 

353, 346, 357, 358, 360 

Anderson, Tami J. Turner 357, 358, 360 

Anderson, Tayler 358 

Anderson, Tracy 358, 360 

Anderson, Trenton 356, 358, 360 

Andrews, Julie 213 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 377 

Apache Indian Nation 254 

Arco, Butte, Idaho 55, 1 14, 136, 

180, 194 

Ard, Ada 103 

Ard, Anona 44 

Arizona 256 

Arizona State University 401 

Arnold, Dar 37 1 

Arnold, Darla Rae see Corpus, Darla Rae Arnold 
Arnold, Kristyn see Hansen, Kristyn Arnold 

Ashton, Fremont, Idaho 104, 160 

Atomic City, Idaho 337 

Auburn, Placer, California 355, 358 

Auburn, Wyoming 355 

Aurora, Arapahoe, Colorado 1 80 

Auger, Brian 216 

Auger, Brian Dylan 216 

Auger, Susan Kaye Burns Black Winward . 208, 214, 216, 
217,219,220 



461 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 

Aurora. Illinois 235 

\\is Powers 287 

A/alia. Washcntaw, Michigan 282 

-B- 

Babcock, Sheriff 116 

Bailey, David 74 

Bailey, Mary Jean Fullmer 67, 68, 72, 

74,75 

Bailey, Mary Jean Fullmer 67, 68 

Bakersfield, California 432, 433, 434 

Baler, Dalene 44 

Bales, Deacon Jackson Berrett 316 

Bales, Mariha Michelle Berrett 316 

Bales, Michial Zane 316 

Bales, Scott Lee 316 

Bannock Regional Hospital 300 

Barbo, David Michael 35 

Barbo, Jennifer Ann French 35 

Barbo, Julie Kay see Peterson, Julie Kay Barbo 

Barbo, Marianne see Virgin, Marianne Barbo 

Barbo, Marilyn Kay Douglass 17, 18, 27, 29, 

31-35 

Barbo, Michael James 35 

Bartos, Cassidy Marie 392, 394 

Bartos, Chris 392 

Bartos, Dylan Ruth 392, 394 

Bartos, Kimberly Jo Henson Forbis 300, 386, 390, 

392, 394 
Basin see Teton Basin 

Bates, Teton, Idaho 42, 46 

Bean, Roberta Lynn (Bobbi) see Douglass, Roberta Lynn 

(Bobbi) Bean 

Bell, Jennifer Joy Fife 14 

Belle City, Maries, Missouri 386, 389 

Bellville's Machine Company 158, 184, 197 

Benedictine Nursing Home 228 

Beneficial Life Insurance 230 

Bennett, Robert, Sixth District Magistrate 

Judge 429 

Beresford, South Dakota 54 

Bevan, Cliff 95 

Bevan, Ross 



Big Hole Mountains 46 

Bird, Cassandra Nicole see Peterson, Cassandra Nicole 

Bird 

Bird, Jameson Stephen 233 

Bird, Jantzen Ryker 233 

Bird, Lori Gay Hansen 163, 221, 222, 

228, 233, 238-240 

Bird, Stephen William 233 

Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho 55, 98, 212, 

242, 250, 284, 368, 426 

Black, Jacob 216 

Blackman, Hazel Gibson Sortor 282 

Black Rock Range 429 

Bloomfield, Missouri 389 

Blue Hills, Webster, Nebraska 282, 317 

Bluhme, Paul 132, 304 

Boca Raton, Florida 24 

Bock, Barbara Jean (Bobbi) see Cedeno, Barbara Jean 

(Bobbie) Bock 

Bock, Bob 382 

Bock, Charles 373, 379 

Bock, Charles Thomas 373 

Bock, Chester Dale 373 

Bock, Dan 382 

Bock, Delores Gay 373, 382 

Bock, Delphine Vernice Edwards 372, 373 

Bock, Diane Marie see Jewett, Diane Marie Bock 

Bock, Donald 373 

Bock, Gertrude 379, 382 

Bock, Janet 382 

Bock, Kathleen Rae see Keating, Kathleen Rae Bock 

Bock, Kenneth Loren 373, 382 

Bock, Leo Darwin 373, 382 

Bock, Orville Daniel 372, 373 

Bock, Orville Raymond 128, 129, 300, 

324, 361, 362, 372-379, 381, 382, 400 
Bock, Sheri Jo see Peterson, Sheri Jo Bock 

Bock, Shirley 382 

Bock, Shirley Ann see Corriea, Shirley Ann Bock 

Bock, Susan (Suzy) Taylor 373, 379 

Bock, Tony Raymond 376, 383, 384 

Bock, Vicki Lou see Root, Vicki Lou Bock 



462 



Index - Vol II 



Bock, Wanda Lou Sortor 101, 128, 129, 

172, 271, 278, 285-287, 290-295, 297, 299, 300, 303, 

31 1, 314, 319, 321-324, 331-334, 341-344, 346, 351, 

354, 361-372, 374-378, 380, 381, 397-400, 407, 417, 

425 

Boddy, Collin McCray 234, 235 

Boddy, Mason Kendrick 234, 235 

Boise, Ada, Idaho 9, 14, 59, 242, 

250, 256, 402, 404, 430, 431-433 

Boise State University 378 

Bon Losee School of Hair Design 236 

Bonneville County, Idaho 52 

Bostic, Eddie 3, 19 

Bourgeous, Daniel 134 

Bourgeous, Kathy Trout 134 

Bowen, Fred 47 

Boy Scouts of America 48 

Breinholt, Kaden 10 

Breinholt, Melanie Trout see Davis, Melanie Trout 

Breinholt 

Breinholt, Nikolas 10 

Bremerton, Washington 373, 374 

Brewer, Teresa 96, 226 

Brewington, Mrs 366, 387 

Broadhead, Hazel Mae Thorsted 159, 281 

Brookfield, Ohio 249 

Broulims 59 

Brower, Nadine see Sortor, Nadine Brower 

Brown Bear Coal Mine 84 

Brown, Brittnie see Sautter, Brittnie Brown 

Buckingham Palace 413 

Budweiser Eight Hitches 56 

Buffalo Bill 55 

Bull, Kathlyn Klis West 232 

Bull, Richard 232 

Burley, Cassia, Idaho 49, 159, 242, 

251,257 
Burris, Bart Deloy 208, 213, 217, 

219 
Burris, Craig Child 208, 214, 215, 

217,219,220 

Burris, Jennie May Nielsen 213 

Burris, Kathy Jean 208, 213, 215- 

217,219 
Burris, Hayden Kenneth 215, 219, 220 



Burris, Landyn Craig 215, 219, 220 

Burris, Sharie Oberhancey 215, 219, 220 

Burris, Shirley Jean Hubbard (Child) 136, 148-150, 

152, 164-166, 170, 172-175, 177, 182, 185, 192, 195, 

196, 205-215, 218-220, 224, 229, 237, 243, 246, 256, 

259, 260, 265, 266, 291, 296, 303, 

Burris, Sierra Michele 215, 219, 220 

Burris, Susan Kaye see Auger, Susan Kaye Burris Black 

Winward 
Burris, Wesley DeLoy 208, 213-215, 

296 

Burris, Wesley 213 

Burrup, Doris Evelyn Standen Ill, 121, 122, 

125, 153, 183, 197,303 
Burwell, Ella Marie see Sortor, Ella Marie Burwell 

Butler, Austin 61 

Butler, Sheri Lee Jensen 61 

Butte, Montana 373 

Buxton, John, Bishop 145 

Byerly, Darrell 54, 64 

BYU-Provo (Brigham Young University) . 228, 230-235 

BYU-Idaho (Ricks College) 100, 271, 274 

BYU-Hawaii 356 

-c- 

Cache (Townsite), Teton (earlier Fremont then Madison), 

Idaho 2-4, 18, 21, 

42, 43, 44, 78, 86, 94, 96, 1 14, 1 15, 136, 137, 167, 180, 
194, 208, 222, 242, 264, 278, 279, 286, 311, 342, 362, 
363, 386, 396, 406, 416, 440, 441 

Cache-Clawson Cemetery 28, 31, 55, 

57,93, 105, 133,443 

Cache LDS Ward 25, 27, 31, 

69,70 

Cache School 4, 6, 20, 

63,70 

Caldwell, Idaho 358 

California 24, 55, 231, 

334, 355, 444 

Call, Fred, Dr 149, 209 

Camas, Idaho 163 

Campbell, Bessie Chase see Madsen, Bessie Chase 
Campbell 

Campbell, Connie 78, 93, 107 



463 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 

Campbell, Lavon 78, 93, 107, 

111 

Campbell, Noma 78, 93, 107 

Campbell, Phil 78, 93, 94, 

100, 104, 107,294,365 

Campbell, Thomas Hilton (Hilt) 93, 94 

Canby, Yellow Medicine, Minnesota 52, 53, 78, 79 

Cantrell, Rick 234 

Cantrell, Starlee Jill Hansen 176, 221, 222, 

228, 234, 238, 240 

Canyon Creek, Idaho 3 

Caron, Marjorie Lavina (Marge) Powell . . 7, 103, 130, 
133,292,303 

Caron, Michael James 187 

Carson City, Nevada 252 

Caterpillar 35 1 

Cedeno, Barbara Jean (Bobbi) Bock 300, 362, 375, 

377,381,383 

Cedeno, Mary Lou 377, 381, 383 

Cedeno, Victor 377, 383 

Cedeno, Vikki Jo 377 

Centertown, Ohio, Kentucky 136, 147, 169, 

208, 222, 242, 260 

Centralia Mining Company 430 

Chandler, Arizona 391 

Chase, Emma Taylor 93 

Chase, Guss 93 

Chase, Richard 24 

Checkers, Chubby 200 

Chesterfield, Bannock, Idaho 348 

Chevrolet Garage 46 

Chevron USA 354 

Chicago, Illinois 235 

Chicago Venture Group 235 

Child, Amy Pearl Madsen Goodson 

Hubbard 479, 480,484, 

485, 7, 51, 80, 81, 83, 89-93, 98, 99, 104- 106, 1 12, 
115, 116, 122, 132, 135-168, 170, 171, 173-178, 180- 
184, 187, 190-192, 194-197, 204-206, 208-212, 219, 
222-225, 228-231, 237, 242-246, 260, 264-268, 273, 
275, 280, 285, 287-291, 294-298, 302-306, 308, 311, 
$12,331,354,355,426,442,444 



Child, Anne Tomine (Minnie) Bolander 

Accampo 155, 157, 185, 

270 

Child, Dora 157 

Child, Elvira Augusta 155 

Child, Evelyn 157 

Child, Flora 156 

Child, Flora Emily Wadsworth 155 

Child, Hannah Austin Wilder 155 

Child, Heber Charles 155, 156 

Child, Heber Thomas 155-159, 171, 

185,265,270,274 
Child, Harold Terry 132, 136, 158, 

162, 166, 171, 173, 175, 179, 184, 189, 190, 198,201, 

202, 206, 212, 226, 228, 243, 245, 246, 260, 263-275, 

354, 360 
Child, Harold Thomas 104, 105, 136, 

154, 158-161, 166, 171, 174-178, 187, 190, 197,205, 

212, 244, 245, 250, 260, 264-268, 273, 275, 276, 294, 

296 



Ch 
Ch 
Ch 
Ch 
Ch 

Ch 
Ch 
Ch 
Ch 

Ch 
Ch 
Ch 
Ch 
Ch 
Ch 
Ch 
Ch 
Ch 
Ch 



Id, Iva Deona 156, 157 

Id, Jennifer Sethman 264, 271, 274 

Id, Julia Lunette 155, 157 

Id, Juanita 157 

Id, Kristan Marie 176, 263, 264, 

271,274,275 

Id, Lila 156 

Id, Minnie Ora 155, 159 

Id, Roberta 271 

Id, Shawn Thomas 263, 264, 271, 

272, 274-276 

Id, Verna Mae 155 

Id, Warren Abiah 155 

Id, Warren Gould 155 

loquin, Oregon 251, 256 

nn, Barbara Bradeson 444 

nn, Birdy 90, 92, 442 

nn, Madeline 443 

nn, Mary Shirlene see Evensen, Mary Shirlene Chinn 

nn, Olive Isabel Leavitt 442 

nn, Velna Syble Madsen 82, 87, 88, 90, 

115, 118, 138-141, 148, 150,279,280,287,302,311, 
439-446 



464 



Index - Vol II 



Chinn, William Easton 442 

Chinn, William Howard 90, 92, 440, 

442-445 

Choules, Albert, Jr 25 

Choules, Albert, Stake President 25 

Choules, Dorothy Wilson see Douglass, Dorothy Wilson 

Choules 

Choules, George Thomas 25, 29 

Choules, Lois see Hoffman, Lois Choules 
Choules, Lois see Tingey, Lois Choules 
Choules, Mary see Harper, Mary Choules 

Choules, Rula Wilson 25 

Christensen, Deanna Gay Goodson 176, 180, 187, 

188 

Christensen, Mike 188 

Christiansen, Shirley 44 

Christopherson, Anne Kristine see Madsen, Anne Kristine 

Christopherson 

Christopherson, John, Bishop 44 

Christopherson, Grant 70 

Christopherson, Vernon 

Chubbuck, Idaho 163, 391 

Church see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 

Clark, Jim 188 

Clark, Karen Lee Goodson 176, 180, 187, 

188 

Clawson, Teton, Idaho 68, 71 

Clear Lake National Park 25 1 

Clooney, Rosemary 96 

Cody, Wyoming 55, 64 

Cominotti, Andrew Lamont 377 

Concord, California 444 

Consolidated Planning Group 230 

Contreras, Armanda 10 

Contreras, Cecilia 10 

Contreras, Cherie Lynn Porter 10 

Contreras, Diego 10 

Contreras, Victoria 10 

Continental Divide 99 

Cook, Ben 59 

Cook, Hunter Adrian 59 

Cook, Katelyn 59 

Cook, Nicole Ann Sautter 59 

Corder, Mrs 403 

Corpus, Andrew Darrell 391, 394 



Corpus, Cameran Lee 391 

Corpus, Darla Rae Arnold 101, 127, 300, 

385, 386, 388, 389, 391, 394, 425 

Corpus, Emma Katherine 391 

Corpus, Emily Larsen 391 

Corpus, Jayson Darrell 391, 394 

Corpus, Mikaela Jane 391 

Corpus, Ray 391 

Corriea, Shirley Ann Bock 373 

Corvallis, Benton, Oregon 222, 228, 234 

Cougar Dental 236 

Court House see Fremont County Court House 

Crazy Horse 53 

Crescent City, Del Note, California 1 14, 1 18 

Crit Colorado Indian Tribe Reservation . . . 254 

Croft, Jess 210, 211 

Crow Indian Nation 55, 64 

Crystal Butte, Idaho 48 

Cub Scouts of America 426 

Custer Battlefield National Monument .... 53 

-D- 

Daily, Bob 7 

Dallas, Dallas, Texas 188 

Davis County Canal 155 

Davis, Dr 3 

Davies, Nancy see Trout, Nancy Davis ... 11,15 

Davis, Aleksa 10 

Deeg, Albert 428 

Deeg, Amanda see Sortor, Amanda Deeg 
Deeg, Pamela Kay see Sortor, Pamela Kay Deeg 

Deeg, Phyllis 428, 429 

Delta Airlines 232 

Denning, Joni Jean 60 

Denning, Karla Jean Piquet 15, 42, 50, 57, 

60,63 
Denning, LaNett Marie see Nield, LaNett Marie Denning 

Denning, Layne Scott 60 

Denning, Scott 60 

Denning, Tasha LaNell see Finn, Tasha LaNell Denning 

Denton, Chet 116 

Denton, George 116 

Denton, George (June), Jr 116 

Denton, Janette Gertrude Puckett Trout ... 8, 1 16, 1 18, 

120-122, 125 



465 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 

Denver, Colorado 186 

Denver. John 165 

Diamond, Neil 356 

Dillon, Beaverhead, Montana 94, 108, 158, 

171, 184, 197,245,273,373 
DiVesti, Jean Sanders see Sorter, Jean Sanders DiVesti 

Doris, Siskiyou, California 1 14, 1 18 

Douglass, Brent James 36 

Douglass, Charles 14 

Douglass, Charles Orrin 2-8, 19-22, 31, 

34, 42-46, 50, 55, 57, 67-72, 86, 87, 89, 1 17, 147, 161, 

282,290,304,313 
Douglass, Dorothy Wilson Choules 17, 18, 25-35, 

39,40,70,71,97, 104,313 

Douglass, Elizabeth Rose Perks 36 

Douglass, Erma Geneal see Fullmer, Erma Geneal 

Douglass 
Douglass, James Vernice (Jim) 3-6, 17,18, 28, 

30, 34, 36, 77, 97, 99, 100, 1 10, 302 

Douglass Guest Ranch 30 

Douglass, Lena Amanda Sweet 43 

Douglass, Lena Ilene see Piquet, Lena Ilene Douglass 
Douglass, Marilyn Kay see Barbo, Marilyn Kay Douglass 
Douglass, Orrin Vernice 3-7, 14, 17-38, 

43-45, 69-71, 81, 82, 85, 87, 88, 95-97, 99, 103, 104, 

106, 110, 116, 117, 160,289 

Douglass, Roberta Lynn (Bobbi) 35, 36 

Douglass, Robbi Sue see Williamson, Robbi Sue Douglass 
Douglass, Rula JoAnn see Rammell, Rula JoAnn Douglass 

Douglass, Ryan Paul 36 

Douglass, Rylie Brynn 36 

Douglass, Stella Rose Madsen 2-5, 9, 13, 14, 

1 9, 20, 34, 42-55, 50, 52, 53, 57, 5 1 , 67-7 1 , 73, 80, 8 1 , 

86, 87, 89, 91, 95, 97, 104, 105, 1 1 1, 1 12, 1 17, 130, 

138, 145, 147, 159, 161, 163, 282, 288-290, 297, 303- 

306,311,313,365,426 

Douglass, Tara Hill 36 

Douglass, Tawnie Lynell 36 

Douglass, Thomas Vernice 18, 28, 36 

Douglass, Zachary Brent 36 

Downey, Idaho 411 

DrijM-s, Idaho 3,6, 18, 22, 

25, 26, 42, 45, 46, 49, 70, 71, 102, 104, 145, 270, 279, 

289, 320 
Droll. Laura Suitor 282 



Dunn, Phillip Andrew 311,315 

Dye, Amy Jeanice Goodson (Child) 104, 136, 146, 

147, 149-152, 155, 161, 166, 168, 173, 175, 179, 181, 

189, 192-201, 205, 206, 209, 210, 212, 224, 260, 265, 

269,291,294,303 

Dye, Barber Dewane, Jr 104, 161, 194, 

199-201,205,260,269,270 

Dye, Connie 203 

Dye, Dennis Bryant 176, 194, 200- 

202, 204, 269, 270 

Dye, Eugene Dewane 194, 200-203, 

269, 270 

Dye, Julie Nylene 194, 200-202, 

270 

Dye, Randy Lynn 176, 194, 200- 

202, 204, 269, 270 

Dye, Sheryl Jeanene 176, 194, 200- 

202, 204, 270 

Dye, Tia Bell 205 

-E- 

Eagle Rock Elementary School 387 

Eardley, Mae 84 

Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center ... 57 

Eastern Idaho State Fair 295, 368 

Eaton's Maternity Home 245, 266 

Economy (Cash) Grocery Store 44, 71 

Edgemont LDS 14 th Ward 231 

Elko, Nevada 358, 378 

Elmes, Pat 152 

Elswood Pontiac 50 

Elswood Trailer Sales 50, 51, 52 

Empey, Amy Marie see Webb, Amy Marie Empey 

Empey, Bailey Kaylynn 316 

Empey, Cassandra Rose Mayo 316 

Empey, Eric 315 

Empey, Ferron James 316 

Empey, Jennifer Jorden 316 

Empey, John Wesley 315 

Empey, Joshua Saul 316 

Empey, Samantha Eloise Mayo 316 

Empey, Sandra Sortor 299, 310, 315 

Empey, Sherry Jean 315 

Empey, Wylynn Monroe 316 



466 



Index - Vol II 



England 25 

Estrada, Daniel 10 

Estrada, Emilio 10 

Estrada, Lisa Maxine Mason (Panos) 10 

Estrada, Michael 10 

Evensen, Edwin Fox 444 

Evensen, Mary Shirlene Chinn 1 18, 150, 440, 

443, 444, 446 

-F- 

Fair View, Lincoln, Wyoming 300, 342 

Farmington, Utah 235 

Farrell, Terry 378 

Farson, Wyoming 430 

Ferguson, Tiara see Sortor, Tiara Ferguson 

Fielding Memorial Cemetery 313, 347 

Fife, Dean Lacone (D.L.) 160 

Fife, Jennifer Joy see Bell, Jennifer Joy Fife 

Fife, Joy Jalene (Jodi) Foster 14, 160 

Filer, Idaho 7, 123 

Finn, Jason 60 

Finn, Kiffin Jace 60 

Finn, Kylee Joe 60 

Finn, Trisha LaNell Denning 60 

Firth, Bingham, Idaho 126, 132, 194, 

197, 199, 200, 227, 271, 275, 294, 313, 322, 345, 346, 

366, 387, 390, 397, 
Firth High School 186, 199, 213, 

227,248,270,271,332 

Firth High School Band 226 

Firth LDS Stake Center 178 

Firth School District 250 

Fishlake National Forest 323 

Florida 235 

FMC 374 

Footprints for Freedom 23 1 

Forbis, Eric 392 

Forbis, Jordyn Joy 392, 394 

Forbis, Kimberly Jo see Bartos, Kimberly Jo Forbis 

Fort Campbell, Kentucky 351 

Fort Carson, Colorado 351 

Fort Douglas, Utah 23 

Fort Hall, Idaho 336 

Fort Knox, Kentucky 351 

Fort Lauderdale-Miami Florida Mission . . . 358 



Fort Riley, Kansas 333 

Forty Horse Cave, Idaho 269 

Foster, Margaret Joy Rathjens see Freeman, Margaret Joy 

Rathjens Foster 
Foster, Merry Lee see Shaw, Merry Lee Foster 
Foster, Shana D see Montgomery, Shana D Foster 
Frandsen, Annetta see Anderson, Annetta Frandsen 

Frandsen, Margaret Kay Willes 348 

Frandsen, Nephi 348 

Freeman, Lynn Henry 103, 159, 160 

Freeman, Margaret Joy Rathjens Foster ... 12, 23, 103, 

153, 159, 160, 183, 196, 280, 293, 442 

Freeman, Tracy Lynn 1 60 

French, Jennifer Ann see Barbo, Jennifer Ann French 

Fullmer, Beatrice 109 

Fullmer, Betty Johnston 74 

Fullmer, Charles 339 

Fullmer, Dale Larry 67, 68, 71, 74, 

75 
Fullmer, Erma Geneal Douglass 4, 14, 15, 19, 

21, 43, 45, 49, 51, 67-75, 89, 95, 105, 1 1 1, 159, 161, 

172,303,365 

Fullmer, Jackie Roberts 74 

Fullmer, Kendi Gerard 74 

Fullmer, Kenneth Lorin 68, 72, 75 

Fullmer, Larry Ray 49, 67-75, 161 

Fullmer, Mary Jean see Bailey, Mary Jean Fullmer 
Fullmer, Merrill Douglass 67, 68, 72, 74, 

75 

Fullmer, Merrill Hansen 71 

Fullmer, Michelle Stanley 74 

Fullmer, Regina Ann 67, 68, 7 1 , 

74,75 

Fullmer, Sidney Ricks 71 

Fullmer, Sive 109 

Fullmer, Teresa Pasley 74 

Fullmer, William Sidney 68, 72, 74, 75 

Fullmer, Wynn Kay 67, 68, 72, 74, 

75 

-G- 

Gale, Marian 167 

Gale Store 137 

Gardner, Grundy, Illinois 78, 1 14, 136, 

278, 440 



467 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 

c rasser, Sammie 167 

Gay Mine, Idaho 200 

Georgetown, Idaho 284 

( tee, Elmo 87 

Gem State Dialysis Center 255 

General Mills Elevator 30, 73 

General Motors 25 

Gerard, Kendi see Fullmer, Kendi Gerard 

Germany 7, 8, 125, 152, 

158, 183, 195, 231, 243, 287, 312, 344, 364, 391, 428 

Gibson, Wally 333 

Gig Harbor, Washington 392 

Gillies, Anthony Samuel 300, 396, 401, 

404 

Gillies, Connor Ward 403 

Gillies, Dan Craig 300, 396, 401, 

403 
Gillies, Dan Sheldon 132, 300, 396, 

401,403 
Gillies, David Craig 14, 300, 396, 

401,403 

Gillies, Evan Drake 403 

Gillies, Hailey Marie 403 

Gillies, Judy Jean Sortor 14, 82, 83, 95- 

98, 100, 106, 131-133, 278, 286, 292-295, 297, 298, 

300, 311, 319, 332, 336, 345, 357, 363, 367, 369, 370, 

374, 376, 380, 387, 395-404, 417, 425, 444 

Gillies, Morgan Tomas 357, 403 

Gillies, Nolan Jacob 402 

Gillies, Robert Christian 300, 396, 401, 

404 

Gillies, Yvonne Scott 403 

Glauner, Benjamin F 283 

Glauner, Sarah 283 

Glenns Ferry, Elmore, Idaho 3, 18, 19, 1 16, 

Ciolightly, Judith Lee Broadhead 159 

Gooding, Idaho 256, 377, 389 

Goodson, Amy Jeanice (Child) see Dye, Amy Jeanice 

Goodson (Child) 
Goodson, Amy Pearl see Child, Amy Pearl Goodson 

Hubbard 

Goodson, Annie Elizabeth Labrum 144 

Goodson, Belly June 160, 161, 179, 

1X0, 1X6- 1 XX, 190, 191 
Goodson, David Bert 180, 187, 188 



Goodson, Deanna Gay see Christensen, Deanna Gay 

Goodson 

Goodson, Elvin Wesley 92, 136, 146, 

149-151, 154, 160, 161, 166, 168, 172, 173, 175, 177, 

179-192, 195-197, 206, 209, 210, 212, 223, 224, 243, 

247, 265, 266, 303, 

Goodson, Ezekiel John 144 

Goodson, Fawn 188 

Goodson, Jennifer 191 

Goodson, John Wesley 136, 143-148, 

161, 168, 180, 181, 195 
Goodson, Karen Lee see Clark, Karen Lee Goodson 

Goodson, Kim 188 

Goodson, Linda Pearl see Hunter, Linda Pearl Goodson 

Goodson, McKenna 191 

Goodson, Michael Elvin 176, 180, 186, 

188 

Goodson, Stephen Ray 176, 180, 187, 

188, 191 

Goodson, Ruby L. Davis 147, 181, 195 

Goshen, Idaho 158, 184, 197, 

198, 199, 212, 213, 215, 245-247, 250, 266, 269 

Goshen LDS Ward 247 

Grace, Idaho 413 

Grand Junction, Colorado 22 

Grand Teton Mall 54 

Grand Teton Peaks 49, 50 

Gray's Lake, Idaho 284 

Great Depression 87, 1 17, 146, 

181 

Greystone Manner 413 

Groveland, Idaho 298 

Gulf States LDS Mission 9 

Gunnison, Utah 60 

Gunnison Valley High School 61 

Guyette, Doctor 223 

-H- 

Hagerman, Idaho 1 87, 285 

Hall, Leslie 167 

Hampton, Virginia 231, 232 

Hancock Fabric 376 

Hancy, Stake President 214 

Hansen, Amanda Jo 235 

Hansen, Amelie Jo Wood 235 



■16X 



Index - Vol II 



Hansen, Amnion Melvin 227 

Hansen, Amy Elizabeth (Lizi) see Matthews, Amy 

Elizabeth (Lizi) Hansen 

Hansen, Andrew Boise 79, 87 

Hansen, Anna Marie Bersnip (Persnip) ... 79, 87 
Hansen, Anna Marie (Mary) see Madsen, Anna Marie 

(Mary) Hansen 
Hansen, Bonnie Rae Hubbard (Child) 102, 136, 148, 

149, 152, 161, 166, 170, 172, 173, 175, 177, 182, 185, 

190, 195, 196, 205, 206, 209, 212, 221-231, 237-240, 

243, 246, 248, 259, 260, 265, 266, 303 

Hansen, Brenna Nicole 236 

Hansen, Charles 227 

Hansen, Colton Kirk 232 

Hansen, Debbie Kaye see West, Debbie Kaye Hansen 

Hansen, Easten 71 

Hansen, Elda 71 

Hansen, Gary David 221, 222, 226- 

231,238-240 
Hansen, Haley Rae see Peacock, Haley Rae Hansen 

Hansen, Hans 79 

Hansen, Hunter Clark 232, 233 

Hansen, Jake Christopher 232, 233 

Hansen, Jonathan Chase 235 

Hansen, Jonathan Kirk (Jon) 162, 222, 228, 

231,235,238,240 
Hansen, Kelley David 176, 221, 222, 

227, 232, 238, 240 

Hansen, Kristyn Arnold 232 

Hansen, Lori Gay see Bird, Lori Gay Hansen 

Hansen, Lucille Smith 227, 231 

Hansen, Marilyn 227 

Hansen, Robert 227 

Hansen, Roy 86 

Hansen, Ryan Kelley 232, 233 

Harris, Jeffrey Brian 36 

Harris, Lori Jo Rammell 36 

Hansen, Starlee Jill see Cantrell, Starlee Jill Hansen 
Hart, Bessie see Higley, Bessie Hart 
Hart, Rose May see Sortor, Rose May Hart 

Hart, Sarah Ellen (Ella) Glauner 282, 283 

Hart, Thomas Benton 282 

Hatch, Mrs 369 

Hawaii 101, 256, 374, 

377,380,381,431 



Hawaiian Islands 344 

Hawthorn Elementary School 367 

Health and Welfare 391 

Heise Hot Springs, Idaho 150, 151 

Hensie, Arnold 84 

Henson, Aura Matheney 389, 393 

Henson, Austin Raygene 300, 376, 385, 

386, 389, 390, 392, 393, 400 
Henson, Beverly Joyce Sortor 89, 100-102, 

105, 126, 129, 130, 172, 278, 285-287, 289, 290, 295- 

298, 300, 303, 31 1, 312, 319, 322, 323, 331, 332, 334, 

336, 343, 351, 363-367, 369, 371, 374, 376, 380, 385- 

390, 392, 394, 397, 398, 400, 407, 417, 425 
Henson, Danny Ray 300, 386, 390, 

391 

Henson, Evan Raygene 391 

Henson, Jaime Rae Ames 391 

Henson, James Leslie 300, 386, 390, 

391 

Henson, Jesse Whittier 392 

Henson, John Wesley 389, 393 

Henson, Kimberly Jo see Bartos, Kimberly Jo Henson 

Henson, Linda Robin Sharp 391 

Henson, Lisa Whittier 391 

Hibbard, Madison, Idaho 278, 285, 311, 

320,321,330, 

Highland High School 358, 419, 428 

Higley, Alfred Dewey 285, 311, 317, 

321 
Higley, Bessie Hart 282, 285, 311, 

317,321 

Higley, Clyde 167 

Higley, Lucy May see Sortor, Lucy May Higley 

Hill, Jess 144, 145 

Hill, Tara see Douglass, Tara Hill 

Hillyard, Ray 93 

Hinchman, Marian Luella (Merry) Powell . 133,302 

Hinckley, Gordon B., President 9 

HK Contractors 60 

Hogan, Jay 55, 64 

Holland 234 

Hoist Trucking 61 

Honolulu, Hawaii 356 

Hooper Springs 297, 399 



469 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 

Hoover, J. Edgar, President 145 

Hopkins, Jacob Thomas 59 

Hopkins, Jared Mark 59 

Hopkins, Mark 59 

Hopkins, Samantha Shelly 59 

Hopkins, Shelly Ilene Sautter 59 

Horseman Hall of Fame 56 

Horseshoe Canyon, Idaho 29, 81, 83, 84, 

96, 105, 1 10, 1 15, 138, 158, 163, 269, 285 

Hose, Mrs 289 

Houston, Harris, Texas 3, 8 

Howard, Doctor 398 

Hubhard, Amy Pearl see Child, Amy Pearl Goodson 

Hubbard 

Hubbard, Beckham H 147 

Hubbard, Bonnie Rae see Hansen, Bonnie Rae Hubbard 

(Child) 
Hubbard, Connie LaRaine see Martin, Connie LaRaine 

Hubbard (Child) 

Hubbard, David Milton 147, 168, 260 

Hubbard, Emmett Noel 89, 90, 92, 

136, 148-152, 169, 170, 181, 183, 195,208-210,222, 

223, 237, 242, 243, 260, 288-290 

Hubbard, Florence Octavia Leisure 147, 169, 260 

Hubbard, Hurchel T 147 

Hubbard, Morba 147 

Hubbard, Shirley Jean see Burris, Shirley Jean Hubbard 

(Child) 
Hunter, Linda Pearl Goodson 176, 180, 186, 

188 

Hunter, Kent 188 

Hyrum, Cache, Utah 2, 18, 42, 68, 

208,213 

-I- 

Idaho 25, 53, 56, 

133,256,284,429,444 

Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 3, 23, 42, 55- 

57,61,68,69,71,72,79,82,88,91,92,97, 122, 125, 
128, 136, 140, 142, 144, 145, 147, 148, 180-182, 195, 
208, 209, 211,215, 222, 223, 242, 243, 255, 264, 268, 
269, 271, 278, 289, 290, 292, 313, 322, 332, 345, 346, 
J48, 357, 362-364, 367, 387, 440, 442 

Idaho falls Fire Department 52 

Idaho Tails l.DS Hospital 27 



Idaho Falls LDS Temple 8, 25, 49, 

51, 57, 59-61, 71, 159, 188, 199, 227, 250, 352 

Idaho State University 392, 401, 402, 

413,422,428 

Illinois 248, 257, 401 

Indio, California 152 

Iowa 56 

Iraq 58 

Irving Middle School 378 

Island Park, Idaho 188, 366 

Island Park Lake see Island Park Reservoir 

Island Park Reservoir 8, 23, 46, 78, 

93, 114, 125, 136, 153, 183, 197, 212, 225, 244, 278, 

293,313,332,440 

-J- 

Jackpot, Nevada 270 

Jackson Hole, Wyoming 47, 334 

Jackson Pass 47, 48 

Jackson, Wanda 101 

Japan 8,94, 125, 

152, 158, 183, 195, 211, 224, 243, 291, 312, 332, 340, 

344 

Jarvis, Dolores, R 144 

Jefferson County Posse 50 

Jensen, Brad 60 

Jensen, Christopher Ray 60 

Jensen, Camille Marie 61 

Jensen, Jason Brad 61 

Jensen, Kolleen Marie Piquet 42, 51, 60, 65 

Jensen, Nichole Rosenvall 60 

Jensen, Sheri Lee see Butler, Sheri Lee Jensen 

Jensen, Tristan Ray 61 

Jewett, Diane Marie Bock 373, 382 

Joe's Food Store 186, 226 

Johnson, Dorothy Jean 349 

Johnston, Betty see Fullmer, Betty Johnston 

J.R. Simplot Company 402, 41 1, 429 

-K- 

KB Construction 60 

Kator, John Michael 357, 413, 414 

Kator, Stephanie Tarbet 300, 357, 358, 

412-414 

Kator, Travis 357, 413, 414 



470 



Index - Vol II 



Keating, Kathleen Rae Bock 373 

Keith, Ora, Dr 80 

Kellogg School of Business 235 

Kentucky 337 

Kern County Sheriff 434 

Kern County Sheriff's Posse 433 

KID Television 268 

Kilgore, Idaho 50 

Killpack, W.L., Temple President 25, 71 

Kimball, Spencer W., President 26, 214 

King, Don 225, 248 

Kinkos 391 

Kittering, Dr 82 

Knight's Refrigeration 421 

Koontz, Miss 344 

Korea 322, 332, 333, 

340 
Korean Conflict (War) 322, 332, 351, 

369 

Kress Store 142 

Kuna, Ada, Idaho 430, 434 

-L- 

Laie, Hawaii 356 

Lake Powell, Utah 289 

Lamont, Idaho 104, 160 

Lamb Weston 400, 420, 428 

Lansing, Michigan 228 

Larsen, Bertha 81 

Larsen, Emily see Corpus, Emily Larsen 

Larsen, Frank 94 

Larsen, Mel 89-91, 93-95, 

102, 154, 162, 286, 287, 291, 293, 298, 312, 331, 354, 

363, 364, 

Larsen, Scotty 94 

Las Vegas, Nevada 228, 432 

Lawn, Alice 101 

Lawrence Welk Show 101, 129 

Lawton, Oklahoma 232 

LDS Church see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 

Saints (Mormons) 

LDS Conference Center 23 1 

League of Women Voters, President 402 

Leatham, Sibil 167 

Leckband, Connie Sanders 300, 335, 337 



Leckband, Glen 337 

LeFlore, Kelly Jill Piquet 58 

LeFlore, Marcus 58 

Leonard Creek Ranch 429 

Leonard Creek School 430 

Lewis, Alma Sortor 282 

Lewis and Clark Elementary School 391, 392 

Lexington, Kentucky 231, 236 

Ley, Bianca Jill 235 

Liberace 129 

Ligget Company 428 

Lincoln, Abraham, President 103 

Lincoln, Lancaster, Nebraska 222, 228, 235 

Lincoln National Insurance 230 

Logan LDS Temple 155, 157 

Logan, Cache, Utah 26, 147, 208, 

214-216, 222, 227, 231, 289, 343 

Logan LDS Temple 213-215 

Long Stroke Painting 377 

Loosli, Lois 45 1 

Loosli, Mark 140 

Lord, Mr 150 

Los Angeles, California 58, 233, 440, 

444 

Los Angeles LDS Temple 58 

Los Angeles Police Academy 58 

Lower Presto School 366 

Lowry Air Force Base 1 86 

Lusitania 81 

Lutheran Church 79 

Lystrop, Uvelse, Fredericksborg, 

Denmark 78, 1 14, 136, 

278, 440 

-M- 

Madison County, Idaho 

Madison County Court House 

Madsen, Anna Christina see Thorsted, Anna Christina 
Thorsted 

Madsen, Anna Marie (Mary) Hansen 3-8, 12, 20, 

23, 45, 46, 51, 69, 70, 78, 79, 82, 83, 88, 89, 93, 1 14, 
115, 118, 119, 121-125, 136-141, 146, 148, 153, 159, 
181-183, 195-197, 209, 211,212, 223-225, 243, 244, 
278-282, 285, 287, 292, 293, 303, 312, 313, 321, 331, 
332, 343-345, 363-366, 440-444 



471 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 

Madsen, Bessie Chase Campbell 78, 93, 94, 

100, 107, 108. Ill 
Madsen, Hans Christian Peter Wilhelm 

(Bill) 3,4,21,43, 

69,78-81, 114, 115,136,147, 181,278,279,282,440- 
442 

Madsen, Johnnie William 3, 4, 19, 29, 

77-112, 117, 131, 138, 140, 159-161, 173,247,255, 
281, 286-287, 290, 291, 296, 297, 303, 306, 311, 312, 
322, 331, 363, 364, 371, 375, 388, 389, 408-410, 418, 
419,425-427,442,444 
Madsen, Lavina Marie see Whyte, Lavina Marie Madsen 

Rathjens Powell 
Madsen, Luella Viola see Trout, Luella Viola Madsen 

Madsen, Mary Reynolds 78, 104, 106 

Madsen, Nellie Sophia (Nell) see Standen, Nellie Sophia 

(Nell) Madsen 
Madsen, Ruby Nada see Sortor, Ruby Nada Madsen 
Madsen, Stella Rose see Douglass, Stella Rose Madsen 
Madsen, Velna Syble see Chinn, Velna Syble Madsen 

Madsen, Viggo Frederick (Hermy) 138 

Maher, Grace 430 

Maher, Leonard 430 

Maher, Tiare see Sortor, Tiare Maher Ferguson 

Make-A-Wish Foundation 377, 378 

Mansfield, John 391 

Manti LDS Temple 58, 60, 61 

Marshall, JoAnn E. see Sortor, JoAnn E. Marshall 

Marshall, John 324 

Marshall, John 324 

Marshall, Monty 324 

Marshall, Opal Furnise 324 

Martin, Connie LaRaine Hubbard (Child) . 96-98, 102, 
105, 136, 147-149, 160-162, 165, 166, 170, 172, 173, 
175, 177, 179, 182, 184, 186, 188, 192, 195, 198, 199, 
201, 205, 206, 21 1-213, 215, 224, 225, 229, 237, 241- 
248, 250-262, 265, 268, 271, 272, 303, 390, 407, 417 

Martin, Ed 47 

Martin, Dr 3 

Martin, Heidi LaRaine see Pickins, Heidi LaRaine Martin 
Martin, Holly Beth see Martines, Holly Beth Martin 

Martin, Jerry 249 

Martin, Lucrecia Moreno 257 

Martin, Maria 257 

Martin, Matthew 256 



Martin, Merly Alejandro 256 

Martin, Nancy 249 

Martin, Richard Bruce 241, 242, 248- 

257, 268, 390 

Martin, Richard Todd 241, 242, 250, 

256 

Martin, Robert (Bob) 249 

Martin, Ryan 256 

Martin, Ryan 257 

Martin, Sara Emily Richards 248 

Martin, Sean 257 

Martin, Thomas Arthur 248 

Martin, Troy Bruce 241, 242, 251, 

257 
Martin, Valerie Kim see Nettgen, Valerie Kim Martin 

Martines, Dean, Jr 257 

Martines, Dean, Sr 257 

Martines, Holly Beth Martin 241, 242, 251- 

253, 257 

Martines, Kaylee Beth 257 

Mary Kaye Cosmetics 431 

Matthews, Amy Elizabeth (Lizi) Hansen . . 176, 222, 236, 

238-240 

Matthews, Corbin Gary, Dr 233, 236 

Matthews, Gracyn Elizabeth 236 

Matthews, River Corbin 236 

Matthews, Shaylen Rae 236 

McCammon, Idaho 336, 355 

McKay, David O., President 26, 27, 40 

McKay, Emma Ray Riggs 26, 40 

McKay, Thomas E 40 

McKay, Fawn Robertson Brimhall 40 

McManus, Bonnie 369 

Meikle, Robert G., Bishop 81, 137, 279 

Meikle, Sophia 3, 43, 69 

Melbourne, Florida 232 

Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona 234, 257 

Mexico 334 

M.H. King Store 7 

Michigan 284, 378 

Mickelsen, Eva Bevan 

Mickelsen, Garth 

Mickelsen, Henry 137, 279 

Mickelsen, Lavaun 44 

Mickelsen, M 45 1 



472 



Index - Vol II 



Mickelsen, Theodore (Ted) 110 

Midland Elevators 24, 27 

Milo, Idaho 61 

Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota 222, 227, 232 

Minnesota 52, 79, 337 

Miskin Scraper Works 60 

Mission Inn 58 

Model T Ford 47, 87, 1 1 7 

Modesto, California 358, 360 

Modesto Fire Department 358 

Moffat, Grandma 4 

Moffat, Ralph 45, 290, 364 

Monopoly 367 

Montana 373 

Monte and Rick's Lock and Key 52 

Monte's Lock and Key 52 

Montgomery, Shana D 14, 24, 37 

Montgomery Ward Catalog 21, 69, 140 

Montgomery Ward Store 408, 417 

Moorepark College 58 

Moreno, Lucrecia see Martin, Lucrecia Moreno 
Mormon or Mormon Church see The Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints 

Morris, Myrna 369 

Morse Code 22, 23 

Motorola Company 401 

Mount Angel College 228 

Mount Rushmore, South Dakota 53 

Mountain Home, Elmore, Idaho 180 

Mountain Home Air Force Base 187 

Mountain State Implement Company 156 

Murdock, Irvin 48 

Murray, Salt Lake, Utah 234 

M.S. Sloterjeick 24 

-N- 

Nakagawa, Alice 366 

Nametag Source 61 

Nampa, Idaho 337 

Nashville, Tennessee 147, 390 

National Guard 48, 59 

Native Americans 283 

Navajo Indian Tribe 255 

Nauvoo, Illinois 297, 401 

Nebraska 283, 284 



Nelson, Eva 142 

Nelson, Ida 142 

Nelson, Mel 89, 93 

Nettgen, Aaron 257 

Nettgen, Jason 257 

Nettgen, Jordan 257 

Nettgen, Krista 248, 257 

Nettgen, Scott 257 

Nettgen, Steven 257 

Nettgen, Valerie Kim Martin 241, 242, 251, 

257,271 

Nevada 256, 377 

Newcastle, California 133 

New Club Cafe 154 

Newfoundland 133 

New Harmony, Washington, Utah 440, 442 

Newhart, Arvella Howe VanLeuvan 419, 420 

Newhart, Bill 420 

Newhart, Carl 420 

Newhart, Dirk 420 

Newhart, Eddie 420 

Newhart, Fred 420 

Newhart, Gene 420 

Newhart, Joann 420 

New Mexico 349 

New York, New York 378 

Nield, Allie Rae 60 

Nield, Gunnar Dean 60 

Nield, Jaden Scott 60 

Nield, LaNett Marie Denning 60 

Nield, Scott 60 

Northern Idaho 250 

Northern States Mission (Minnesota and 

Canada 100 

Northwestern Law School 235 

-o- 

Oahu, Hawaii 43 1 

Oakland 'A's 356 

Oberhancey, Sharie see Burris, Sharie Oberhancey 

Ocerman, Steve 269 

O.E. Bell Junior High School 346, 368 

Ogden, Utah 47, 155, 271, 

274 
Old Faithful Bottling Company 71, 72 



473 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



( )W\ Faithful Geyser 

Oregon 228,231,251, 

Oregon City, Clackamus, Oregon 222, 228, 233 

Oregon State University 228 

Oregon Trail 55, 64 

Orem, Utah, Utah 234 

Orr, Beth 127 

Osgood, Idaho 144 

Oslo, Norway 234 

-P- 

Packsaddle Canyon, Idaho 29, 84, 99, 

137 

Paint Breed Show 433 

Paint Horse Association 54 

Paint Horse Journal 50 

Panos, Alivia Ann 10 

Panos, Chalena Lee 10 

Panos, Charissa Lee 10 

Panos, Tony Martin 10 

Paradise, Cache, Utah 348 

Parker, Arizona 254 

Parkinson, Dr 3, 43 

Parma, Idaho 358 

Patterson Ranch, Montana 54 

Pasley, Teresa see Fullmer, Teresa Pasley 

Peacock, Haley Rae Hansen 162, 176, 221, 

222, 233, 234, 238-240 

Peacock, Jackson Blake (Jax) 234 

Peacock, James Brad 234 

Peacock, Jansen Quade 234 

Peacock, Jason Brock 234 

Peacock, Jocelyn Rae 234 

Peacock, Jordan Brad 234 

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 7, 93, 123, 

211, 224, 29 1 , 3 1 2, 344, 356, 365, 372-374, 43 1 

Peck, Mae 127 

Perks, Elizabeth Rose see Douglass, Elizabeth Rose Perks 

Peters, Benjamin 10 

Peters, Dana Rose Jenkins 10 

Peters, Duane (ilenn 10 

Peters, l;icob 10 

Peters, Jessica 10 

Peters, Joshua 10 



Peters, Rachael 10 

Peters, Rebekah 10 

Peterson, Cassandra Nicole Bird 163, 233 

Peterson, Chantyl 378, 383 

Peterson, Christopher 233 

Peterson, Jared 378, 383 

Peterson, Julie Kay Barbo 35 

Peterson, Mrs 287, 365 

Peterson, Robert 377 

Peterson, Ryan Edward 35 

Peterson, Savanya 378, 383 

Peterson, Sheri Jo Bock 300, 362, 375, 

376, 383 

Philip, Ed 50 

Philippines 24, 256, 324, 

372 

Phoenix, Arizona 134, 337, 391 

Pillsbury Processing Plant 188 

Pickens, Caitlin 256 

Pickens, Heidi LaRaine Martin 241, 242, 250, 

251,254,256 

Pickens, Jessica 256 

Pickens, Keely 256 

Pickens, Tyler 256 

Pickens, William (Will) 256 

Pine Forest Range 429 

Pine Ridge Pacers 298 

Pingree, Idaho 392 

Piny Creek Pass 270 

Piquet, Angela Staker 61 

Piquet, Augustus 46, 49 

Piquet, Betty LaNell see Sautter, Betty LaNell Piquet 

Piquet, Brand Mark 61 

Piquet, Donetta 49 

Piquet, Holly Ann see Waite, Holly Ann Piquet 

Piquet, Judy McEwan 58 

Piquet, Karla Jean see Denning, Karla Jean Piquet 

Piquet, Kelly Jill see LeFlore, Kelly Jill Piquet 

Piquet, Kolleen Marie see Jensen, Kolleen Marie Piquet 

Piquet, Kolt Monte 61 

Piquet, Lena Ilene Douglass 3, 4, 6, 6, 14, 

15, 19, 21, 31, 41-46, 49-58, 61, 65, 69-71, 89, 130, 
159, 161, 172,303,365 

Piquet, Marcus Richard 58 

Piquet, Mary Martin 46, 47, 49 



474 



Index - Vol II 



Piquet, Mattie 49 

Piquet, Montrose 29, 41, 42, 46- 

65,70,71, 105 

Piquet, Newell 443, 50 

Piquet, Payden Rope 62 

Piquet, Richard Douglas 42, 49, 51, 58, 

65 

Piquet, Shane Mark 42, 52, 61, 65 

Piquet, Shauna Ilene 61 

Piquet, Sunni 58 

Piquet, Yesika Acosta 58 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 59 

Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 51, 98, 125- 

127, 129-132, 152, 162, 163, 278, 295-299, 310, 314, 

315, 320, 323, 324, 334, 337-339, 342, 348, 349, 351, 

352, 354, 355, 357, 362, 369-378, 386-391, 396, 397, 

400, 402, 403, 406, 407, 41 1-413, 416, 417, 419-421, 

425, 428, 434 

Pocatello Police Department 351 

Pocatello (Poky) High School 295, 324, 370, 

371, 377, 387, 391, 392, 400, 420 

Polynesian Center, Hawaii 356 

Ponds Lake see Island Park Reservoir 

Ponds Lodge, Idaho 

Porter, Cherie Lynn see Contreras, Cherie Lynn Porter 

Porter, Errol 9 

Porter, Stella Darleen Trout 2, 8, 9, 15, 46 

Porter, Stephen Michael 10 

Portland, Multnomah, Oregon 162, 222, 228, 

233,264,271,354 

Portneuf, Medical Center 391 

Post Register see Idaho Falls Post Register 

Powell, Grant Ulysses 1 19, 303 

Powell, Leola Merlyn Rich 52, 53, 55, 75, 

159 
Powell, Marian Luella (Merry) see Hinchman, Marian 

Luella (Merry) Powell 
Powell, Marjorie Lavina (Marge) see Caron, Marjorie 

Lavina (Marge) Powell 
Powell, Virgil Elwood (Bud) 31, 55, 75, 

159,303 

Premier Technology 391, 413 

Preston, Idaho 79, 284 

Provo LDS Temple 234, 236 



Provo, Utah, Utah 2, 25, 61, 136, 

161, 162, 174, 228, 233-236, 264 

Prudential Life Insurance 230 

Purcell, Heidi LaRee see Rammell, Heidi LaRee Purcell 

-It- 
Radar School 24 

Radio School 23, 24 

Raleigh, North Carolina 232 

Rammell, Andrew Shayne 36 

Rammell, Douglass Shayne 36 

Rammell, George Shayne 36 

Rammell, Gregory Shayne 36 

Rammell, Heidi LaRee Purcell 36 

Rammell, Jerek Shayne 36 

Rammell, Justus John 36 

Rammell, Lisa Ann 36 

Rammell, Lori Jo see Harris, Lori Jo Rammell 

Rammell, Rula JoAnn Douglass 17, 18, 28, 36 

Ranier, Albert, III, Prince of Monaco 55, 56, 64 

Rappeleye, Bryce 47 

Rathjens, Lavina Marie Madsen see Whyte, Lavina Marie 

Madsen Rathjens Powell 
Rathjens, Margaret Joy see Freeman, Margaret Joy 

Rathjens Foster 

Rathjens, William Henry 138 

Reform School see Idaho State Youth Service Center 

Reid, Bob 269 

Reid, Ted 269 

Reno, Washoe, Nevada 8, 320, 325, 

326, 335 
Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 4, 18, 27, 48, 

103, 132, 278, 285, 287, 288, 291, 312, 321, 342, 344, 

363, 
Rich, Leola Merlyn see Powell, Leola Merlyn Rich 

Richards, Iva 249 

Richards, Sara Emily see Martin, Sara Emily Richards 
Richvale, Teton, Idaho 278, 285, 311, 

321,330,339 
Ricks College see BYU-Idaho 

Ricks, Dermont, Bishop 247 

Rigby, Jefferson, Idaho 35, 60, 78, 91, 

93,211,290,365 
Riggs, Charlene 255 



475 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 

Rim Village, Oregon 251 

Ripplinger, Richard 255 

Riverdale, Utah 155 

Riverside, Orange, California 58, 136, 208, 

222, 242 

Riverview Assisted Living Center 57 

Roberts, Idaho 144 

Roberts, Jackie see Fullmer, Jackie Roberts 

Romney. Marion G., President 214 

Roosevelt, Franklin D., President 146 

Root, James Lee 376 

Root, Vicki Lou Bock 127, 300, 362, 

375,376,383,384,411 

Rorda, Piquet and Bessie 58 

Rudd, Gweneth 167 

-s- 

Sacramento, Sacramento, California 1 14, 133, 430 

Sage Brush Inn 333 

St. Anthony City Park 93 

St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho 4, 8, 23, 46, 

89, 97, 1 17, 125, 136, 146, 153, 159, 181, 183, 14, 195, 

196, 21 1, 224, 244, 282, 285, 293, 310, 311, 320, 321, 

330,331,442 
St. Anthony Community Hospital, 

Pocatello 129, 297, 388, 

428 

Saint Bernard 413 

Salina, Sevier, Utah 320, 323 

Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 71,213, 222, 

228, 231-233, 235, 236, 330, 335, 339, 353, 377, 378, 

430,431,444 

Salt Lake LDS Temple 59, 235 

San Antonio, Texas 134 

San Diego, California 257, 373 

Santa Monica, California 444 

Santa Rosa, California 428 

Sautter, Betty LaNell Piquet 42, 49, 50, 57, 

65 

Sautter, Brenda Rose 59 

Sautter, Brittnie Brown 59 

Sautter, ( lade Travis 59 

Sautter, Carson Reed 59 

Sautter, Larry 59 



Sautter, Nicole Ann see Cook, Nicole Ann Sautter 
Sautter, Shelly Bene see Hopkins, Shelly Bene Sautter 

Sautter, Todd Monte 59 

Sautter, Travis Larry 59 

S.C. Anderson Company 430, 432 

Schweider, Corrine 57 

Scobie, Bea 185 

Scobie, Carl 185, 186 

Scottsdale, Maricopa, Arizona 396, 401, 403, 

404 

Scoville, Idaho 402 

Sears Roebuck Catalog 140 

Sears Store 23 1 

Second World War see World War II 

Sharon, Mercer, Pennsylvania 242, 248 

Sharp, Linda Robin see Henson, Linda Robin Sharp 

Shaw, Merry Lee Foster 14, 24, 37, 80, 

83,95,99, 102 

Shelley, Bingham, Idaho 59, 79, 90, 

136, 155-158, 171, 180, 184-186, 188, 194, 197,208, 

212, 215, 222, 226, 242, 245, 264, 266, 274, 278, 294, 

396, 397 

Shelley High School 59 

Shelley Second Ward 265, 269 

Shelley, John F 155, 156 

Sheridan, Montana 373 

Shimata, Harry 371 

Ship Creek 324 

Shore, Dinah 96 

Shoshone, Idaho 349 

Sievers, Mike 337 

Sievers, Renae Sortor 299, 330, 335, 

337 
Simplot see J.R. Simplot Company 

Skyline Trail 50 

Smith, Cashelle Marie 316 

Smith, Shelley Sortor 299, 315, 316 

Smithfield, Cache, Utah 2, 18, 42, 68 

Snake River 117 

Snyder, Marlene 399 

Soap Box Derby 249 

Soda Springs Cemetery 299 

Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho 278, 282-284, 

298, 300, 3 1 0, 3 1 1 , 3 1 7, 320, 32 1 , 330, 342, 358, 362, 

386,396,411-413,416,432 



476 



Sorensen, Douglas 1 67 

Sortor, Amanda Deeg 301, 424, 429, 

430, 432, 433, 437 
Sortor, Alma see Lewis, Alma Sortor 

Sortor, Alma May 284 

Sortor, Ashlynn 434 

Sortor, Barbara 303 

Sortor, Beverly Joyce see Henson, Beverly Joyce Sortor 
Sortor, Beverly Robinson 299, 330, 334, 

335 

Sortor, Billy 327, 344 

Sortor, Chase 326 

Sortor, Connie Sanders see Leckband, Connie Sanders 

Sortor 

Sortor, Courtney 433, 437 

Sortor, Dale George 93, 172, 278, 

285, 299, 303, 31 1, 312, 318, 321, 322, 327, 329-336, 

339, 340, 343, 363, 365, 368, 369, 387, 397, 407, 417, 

425 

Sortor, Darrell 327 

Sortor, Debbie Chapman 300, 330, 335- 

338 
Sortor, Donald 299, 330, 334, 

337, 339 

Sortor, Ella Marie 316 

Sortor, Ella Marie Burwell 295, 299, 309, 

310, 313-315, 323, 347, 353, 368-370, 374, 388 
Sortor, Erma Marlene see Anderson, Erma Marlene 

Sortor 

Sortor, Gene Gibson 282 

Sortor, George Henry 282, 284, 285, 

288, 290, 292, 332, 344, 365, 374, 380, 400 

Sortor, George Washington 282 

Sortor, Hazel Gibson see Blackman, Hazel Gibson 

Sortor, Heidi 337 

Sortor, Howard Delmer 93, 172, 278, 

285, 295, 298, 299, 303, 309-315, 318, 319, 321, 323, 

327, 331, 336, 341, 343, 347, 348, 351, 354, 363, 368- 

370, 374, 387, 388, 397, 407, 417, 425, 434 
Sortor, Howard Leslie 6, 87, 88, 90, 

92, 93, 99, 102, 104, 122, 123, 127, 128, 131, 150, 277, 

278, 284-301,303, 304, 307, 310, 311-315, 317, 318, 

320-323, 325, 327, 330-334, 342-346, 352, 362-372, 

376, 380, 386, 387, 390, 396-403, 406-412, 416-418, 

424-429 



Index - Vol II 

Sortor, Jean Sanders DiVesti 300, 320, 335, 

336 
Sortor, JoAnn E. Marshall 295, 299, 320, 

323-327, 347, 351, 370, 372, 374, 407 
Sortor, John Sanders 300, 330, 335, 

337 

Sortor, Joseph 434 

Sortor, Judy Jean see Gillies, Judy Jean Sortor 

Sortor, Justice 434 

Sortor, Justin Dale 300, 330, 335, 

337, 338 

Sortor, Karmen 338 

Sortor, Katherine VanDyke 282 

Sortor, Kennedy 434 

Sortor, Lance Ferguson 424, 431, 434, 

435, 437 
Sortor, Laura see Droft, Laura Sortor 
Sortor, LaVerl Dean 88, 172, 278, 

285, 286, 295, 299, 303, 311,312, 318-327, 327, 331, 

332, 336, 343, 347, 363, 368-370, 372, 374, 387, 397, 

407,417,425 

Sortor, Liberty 434 

Sortor, Lloyd 325 

Sortor, Lucy May Higley 278, 285, 310, 

311,317,318,320,321,330,331, 
Sortor, Luella Colleen see VanLeuven, Luella Colleen 

Sortor 

Sortor, Maeline 326 

Sortor, Mary 291, 292, 344, 

365 
Sortor, Michael 299, 320, 325, 

326 
Sortor, Michael A 323, 324, 325, 

326 
Sortor, Nadine Brower 298, 299, 309, 

310,315,336,354 
Sortor, Pamela Kay Deeg 297, 301, 424, 

428-430 

Sortor, Raquel 434 

Sortor, Renae see Sievers, Rena Sortor 

Sortor, Richard Leslie 278, 296, 297, 

301, 31 1, 324, 333, 336, 352, 372, 374, 380, 399, 400, 

407-409, 417, 418, 423-430, 432-438 
Sortor, Ricky 301, 424, 429, 

430, 432, 434-436 



477 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 

SortOT, Rocky 299, 330, 335, 

337 
Sortor, Rodney (Bim) 299, 330, 334, 

337 
Sortor, Ronald 299, 330, 334, 

337, 339 
Sortor, Rose May Hart 282-285, 292, 

345, 369, 374, 380 
Sortor, Ruby Darlene 278, 291, 292, 

303, 312, 322, 332, 344, 365, 397, 417-419, 421, 425 
Sortor, Ruby Nada Madsen 51, 81, 82, 87, 

89-91,93,98, 101, 102, 104, 106, 112, 115, 116, 122, 

123, 126-128, 130-132, 138-141, 159, 163, 197, 245, 

265, 277-282, 285-306, 308, 311-315, 318, 321-323, 

331-333, 342-347, 352-356, 360, 362-371, 374-376, 

380, 386, 387, 390, 394, 396-403, 406-410, 416-421, 

424-429, 442-444 

Sortor, Russell 327 

Sortor, Sandra see Empey, Sandra Sortor 

Sortor, Sandra Lee see Tarbet, Sandra Lee Sortor 

Sortor, Sheila see Taresh, Sheila Sortor 

Sortor, Shelley see Smith, Shelley Sortor 

Sortor, Shirlene see Valai, Shirlene Sortor 

Sortor, Stacy Delmer 299, 310, 315, 

316 
Sortor, Stephen 299, 320, 325, 

326 

Sortor, Sutton Leslie 316 

Sortor, Syral Samuel 284 

Sortor, Teri 337 

Sortor, Tiara Maher Ferguson 301, 423, 424, 

430-438 

Sortor, Travis Howard 316 

Sortor, Troy 301, 424, 429, 

430, 434-436 
Sortor, Vic Grudzinski 300, 330, 335, 

337 
Sortor, Wanda Lou see Bock, Wanda Lou Sortor 

Sortor, Wilford 282 

Sortor, William Franklin (Bill) 284,291 

South Dakota 53 

South Jordan, Utah 234 

Southeastern Idaho State Fair 56 

Southern California 358 

Southern Idaho 268 



Southern States Mission 25, 26 

Spanish Fork, Utah 61 

Spencer, Idaho 145, 150 

Spring Gulch, Wyoming 47 

Sprouse Reitz Store 73 

Staddaheur, Mrs 398, 399 

Staker, Angela see Piquet, Angela Staker 

Staley, Tiffani see Tarbet, Tiffani Staley 

Standen, Doris Evelyn see Burrup, Doris Evelyn Standen 

Standen, George A 3, 8, 23, 46, 

89,91-93, 102, 125 139, 141, 143, 153, 154, 183, 196, 

197,212,225,244,293,366 
Standen, Nellie Sophia (Nell) Madsen 3, 8, 23, 46, 

70, 89, 91-93, 121, 122, 125, 138, 139, 141-143, 149, 

153, 183, 196, 211, 212, 225, 244, 287, 289, 293, 303, 

313,332,343,366 
Standen, Sandra Gay Heath 8, 23, 46, 70, 

93, 125, 153, 183, 197, 211, 212, 225, 144, 293, 303, 

313,332,366 
Standen, Thelma Heath 8, 23, 46, 70. 

93, 125, 153, 183, 197, 211, 212, 225, 244, 293, 303, 

313,332,366 
Standen, William George (Bill), Lieutenant 8, 23, 46, 93, 

125, 153, 154, 183, 197, 212, 225, 244, 293, 366 

Stanley Basin, Idaho 269 

Stanley, Michelle see Fullmer, Michelle Stanley 

Star Valley, Wyoming 348, 350, 357 

Steffler, Connie 269 

Stewart Indian School 254 

Stewart, Nevada 252, 253 

Stocklien, David 55, 64 

Subic Bay, Philippines 373, 374 

Sugar City, Madison, Idaho 6, 21, 44, 278, 

285, 291, 293, 303, 311-313, 321, 322, 332, 337, 344, 

345, 365, 386, 387 

Sugar City/Sugar Salem School 44 

Sugar Salem, Idaho 363 

Sugar Factory 6, 21 

Swamp Ditch 4 

Sweet Adelines 9 

-T- 

Tacoma, Washington 332, 369, 373 

Tanner, L. Nathan, President 214 

Tarbet, Alice 411 



478 



Index - Vol II 



Tarbet, Dallin 411 

Tarbet, David 300, 405, 406, 

411-413 

Tarbet, John 411 

Tarbet, John 300, 405, 406, 

412-414 

Tarbet, Marie 411 

Tarbet, Paula 411 

Tarbet, Ray 411 

Tarbet, Sandra Lee Sortor 278, 295, 311, 

314, 323, 333, 347, 357, 370, 374, 376, 380, 387, 395, 

397, 398, 400, 405-413, 417, 418, 425-427, 432 
Tarbet, Stephanie see Kator, Stephanie Tarbet 

Tarbet, Tiffani Staley 413, 414 

Taresh, Kevin 337 

Taresh, Sheila Sortor 300, 310, 330, 

335, 337 

Target 392 

Tate, James 10 

Tate, Kimberly Lynn Oney 10 

Tate, Salem 10 

Tautphaus Park 55 

Teeples, Clifton 213 

Tennessee 232 

Tennessee Medical Center 232 

Teton Basin, Idaho 3, 4, 6,19, 29, 

34, 40, 44, 46, 54, 57, 71, 80, 82, 86, 91-95, 97, 106, 

1 17, 123, 140, 147, 159, 173, 178, 269, 280, 282, 284- 

286, 289, 204, 311-313, 318, 321, 343, 365, 389, 409, 

418,426,442,444 

Teton Canyon, Idaho 159 

Teton City, Idaho 

Teton City Park 15 

Teton County Assessor 30 

Teton County Court House 30 

Teton County, Idaho 

Teton County School District 

Teton High School 6, 23, 26, 31 , 

45, 48, 63, 70 

Teton, Idaho 21 

Teton River 4, 5, 20, 43, 

44, 100,426 

Teton River Bridge 5 

Teton School Board 31 



Teton Valley Hospital 55, 100 

Teton Valley, Idaho 25, 28, 31, 

46, 48, 49, 71, 95, 96, 1 15, 1 17, 137 

Teton Valley Saddle Club 31 

Tetonia Cemetery 159 

Tetonia, Teton, Idaho 2, 18, 34, 36, 

42,43,63,68,69,71,78,84, 103, 104, 107, 108, 112, 

133, 136, 137, 141, 146, 161, 180, 219, 255, 291, 322, 

331, 332, 363, 365, 387, 427, 441, 443 

Tetonia LDS Ward 27, 1 12 

Tetonia Rodeo 31 

Tew, Rodney, Bishop 250 

Texas 188 

Thatcher, Gordon 103 

Thayne, Wyoming 350 

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 

(Mormons) 9, 32, 34, 70, 

71, 79, 81, 125, 137, 141, 182, 214, 231, 250, 255, 257, 

268, 279, 281, 293, 345, 367, 387, 399, 409-41 1,419, 

426,441 

The Commission on Aging 228 

Thorsted, Anna Christina Madsen 51, 90, 97, 

1 12, 138, 159, 281, 282, 296, 298, 304, 305, 311, 353 

Thorsted, Grant Royal 281, 446 

Thorsted, Harold Peter 138, 304 

Thorsted, Howard Leroy 281 

Thousand Oaks, California 58 

Tolt Service Group 391 

Toys-R-Us 59 

Treasure Valley Showtime Chorus 9 

Tremonton, Box Elder, Utah 406, 41 1 

Tressel, Addie 101, 131 

Trout, Adam 11 

Trout, Alexis 11 

Trout, Brian 11 

Trout, Danielle 131, 134 

Trout, David Lee 2, 9, 1 1 

Trout, Janette Gertrude Puckett see Denton, Janette 

Gertrude Puckett Trout 

Trout, Jimmie 418 

Trout, Judith Buchanan 10, 15 

Trout, Kathy see Bourgeous, Kathy Trout 

Trout, Kay 133 

Trout, Larry Dean 2, 9, 1 1, 14, 

15 



479 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 

Trout. Lee • ' 

Trout. Lee Roy 8, 1 16 

Trout, Lewis L 2, 8, 46, 

70, 116,303 

Trout, Lorena 11 

Trout, Luella Viola Madsen 7, 51, 81, 82, 

98, 99, 101, 1 12-134, 138, 289, 294-296, 298, 302-306, 

308, 311, 323, 343, 346, 367, 370, 388, 397, 407, 410, 

418,419,425,426,444 
Trout, Melanie see Davis, Melanie Trout Breinhojt 

Trout, Nancy Davis 11 

Trout, Philip 11 

Trout, Rianna 11 

Trout, Robert Lewis 1 14, 1 18, 120, 

125, 126, 129, 131, 134, 293, 294, 345, 346, 367 
Trout, Robert Wesley 7, 8, 1 13, 

114, 116-125, 133,294,346,367 

Trout, Roger 11 

Trout, Ronald Vernice 2, 8-10, 15, 

110 

Trout, Ronnie 418 

Trout, Stella Maxine Douglass 1-12, 14, 15, 

19, 20, 22, 43, 44, 46, 69, 70, 80, 81, 85, 86, 96, 99, 

104, 105, 1 16, 1 17, 126, 132, 133, 289, 291, 303, 402, 

441 

Trout, Steven Lewis 2, 8, 1 1 

Trout, Suzanne 11 

Trout, Wesley Melvin 1 13, 1 14, 1 17, 

1 2 1 , 1 24- 1 26, 1 28, 1 33, 294, 303, 345, 346, 4 1 8 
Trout, William Leroy 1 14, 1 18, 120, 

121, 125, 126, 134, 293, 294, 345, 346, 367 

Trout, Yvonne Gayle Windsor 134 

Tucson, Arizona 392 

Turkey 326 

Turner, Mr 1 19, 120 

Turner, Mrs 119 

Twin Falls, Idaho 2, 7-9, 1 14, 

1 16, 1 19-124, 133, 136, 144, 180, 194, 293, 345 

-u- 

Ucon, Idaho 50, 60, 61 

Uinta Mountains, Utah 231, 235, 431 

Union Pacific Railroad 3 



United States of America (U.S.) 24, 54, 145, 

152, 187, 197, 21 1, 243, 287, 312, 323, 332, 344, 364 

University of Idaho, Moscow 250 

University of Minnesota 227 

University of Tennessee 232 

University of Utah, Salt Lake City 334 

Upper Presto School 366 

Upper Snake River Valley 55 

U.S. Air Force 23, 133, 186, 

188, 189,231,247,267,326 

U.S. Army 23, 322, 324, 

332, 333, 339, 348, 351, 368, 373, 391, 427, 428, 432 

U.S. Army Air Force 8 

U.S. Army National Guard 10 

U.S. Marine Corps 58, 231, 313, 

368,372-374,381 

U.S. Naval Base Hospital, Diego Garcia . . 257 

U.S. Naval Ordinance Plant, Pocatello ... 372 

U.S. Navy 199, 257, 41 1 

Utah 78,430 

Utah State University, Logan (Agricultural 

College) 26, 227 

Utah Valley State College (UVSC) 61 

-V- 

Valai, Auro Stacy Poni Tufuga 316 

Valai, Cassandra Sariah 316 

Valai, Shirlene Sortor 299, 310, 315, 

316 

Valai, Tioane Johnney Poni Tufuga 316 

Valley Baseball League 27 

Valley Care Center 163 

Vancouver, Clark, Washington 310 

VanLeuvan, Arvella Howe see Newhart, Avella Howe 

VanLeuvan 

VanLeuvan, Brandy 300, 416, 420, 

421 

VanLeuvan, Emily 300, 357, 415, 

416,420-422 

VanLeuvan, Katie 300, 415, 416, 

420-422 

VanLeuvan, Luella Colleen Sortor 278, 296, 299, 

300, 31 1, 314, 324, 333, 352, 357, 371, 374, 376, 380, 

390, 395, 399, 400, 407-409, 415-421, 425 



4X0 



Index - Vol II 



VanLeuvan, Michael 300, 415, 416, 

419-421 

Victor, Idaho 93, 104, 160 

Vietnam 187, 41 1, 426 

Vietnam War 1 87 

Viken, Sharon 369 

Virginia City, Idaho 160 

Virgin, Lane Dennis 35 

Virgin, Madalyn Ann 35 

Virgin, Marianne Barbo 32, 35 

Votech 391 

-w- 

Waite, Amanda 58 

Waite, Edwin 58 

Waite, Holly Ann Piquet 58 

Waite, Jacob William 58 

Waite, Joshua Richard 58 

Wal*Mart 358 

Washington 333, 377, 430, 

444 

Washington, D.C 352, 353 

Washington Seattle Mission 257 

Webb, Amy Marie Empey 316 

Webb, Daniel Beebe 316 

Webb, Joanee Beebe 316 

Webb, Sydni 316 

Webb, Steve 316 

Weber State College 271, 274 

West, Ashlee Elizabeth 231, 232 

West, Aubrianne Kaye 231, 232 

West, Debbie Kaye Hansen 221, 222, 227, 

231,232,238,240 

West Chubbuck Road 428 

West, Kathlyn Klis see Bull, Kathlyn Klis West 

West, Richard Joseph 231, 232 

West, Richard W 231 

West, Walter, Dr 164, 165, 210, 

211 

Westinghouse 402 

West (Side) or Big Hole Mountains 21, 29, 48 

West Valley, Salt Lake, Utah 235 

West Yellowstone, Montana 55 

Wes Vaco 295, 314, 370 

Wheeler, Dee 399 



Whipple, Mr 252 

Whyte, Lavina Marie Madsen Rathjens 

Powell 7,23,31,51- 

53,80,82,89,93,95,98, 101, 102, 104, 111, 112, 124, 
130, 131, 133, 138, 153, 158-162, 183, 187, 196, 197, 
225, 293, 294, 296-298, 302, 304, 305, 352, 426 

Whyte, William Chapman (Will) 294, 303 

Williamson, Larry Adam 36 

Williamson, Robbi Sue Douglass 36 

Wilson, Grant 26 

Wilson, Suzanne 25 

Wilson, Wyoming 47 

Winnemucca, Humboldt, Nevada 320, 325, 326, 

429 

Winward, Brian 216 

Winward, Brindee Kay 216, 219, 220 

Winward, Brooklyn Jean 216, 220 

Winward, Chase Thomas 216, 219, 220 

Winward, Dalton Brian 216 

Winward, Susan Kaye^e Auger, Susan Kaye Burris Black 
Winward 

Wichita, Kansas 232 

Woodville, Bingham, Idaho 284 

Wolf Creek, Idaho 48 

Wolverine Canyon, Idaho 145, 158, 269 

Works Progress Administration (WPA) ... 146, 182 

World Trade Center 378 

World War I 82 

World War II 23, 31, 45, 48, 

123, 152, 195,211,243,291,313,373 

-Y- 

Yellowstone Highway 

Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming 

Yellowstone National Park 53, 55, 64, 

127, 158, 160,268,334 
Yuma, Yuma, Arizona 242, 250, 251, 

257 

-z- 

Zion National Park 



481 



OUR HERITAGE: The Madsen Family 



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PROPERTY OF. 
DAVID 0. McKAY LIBRARY 
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